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Note on Manton's Plan to Destroy SF

Lucky Strike

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Originally Posted by grimslade
It was Levi Strauss who first delineated the essentially cultural nature of the distinction between raw and cooked denim, IIRC.
His cousin composed a waltz about it. An der schönen blauen Denim.
 

summej2

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Originally Posted by AlanC
Did Capt. Kirk ever wear Levi's?

Certainly not! It is the essential tension between neoclothingites, wearing synthetic stretchy things, and paleoclothingites, wearing natural fibers.
 

skalogre

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Originally Posted by Lucky Strike
His cousin composed a waltz about it.

An der schönen blauen Denim.



 

AlanC

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Originally Posted by summej2
Certainly not! It is the essential tension between neoclothingites, wearing synthetic stretchy things, and paleoclothingites, wearing natural fibers.

True, but with an ironic reversal of the positions.
 

JLibourel

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Originally Posted by AlanC

All we need is a good Kirkian to counteract the Straussian influence...


I thought you meant Russell Kirk, rather than the Star Trek character. I once had lunch with Russell Kirk. He was a good deal less interesting in person than his writings had led me to expect, I regret to report.
 

AlanC

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Originally Posted by JLibourel
I thought you meant Russell Kirk, rather than the Star Trek character. I once had lunch with Russell Kirk. He was a good deal less interesting in person than his writings had led me to expect, I regret to report.

I did (as I'm sure medwards knows), but I didn't want to interrupt the tongue-in-cheek stream of consciousness.

I worked for Dr. Kirk for a year, and he actually was quite interesting, but not always terribly talkative. How did you have occasion to eat with him?
 

Patrick06790

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Originally Posted by AlanC

All we need is a good Kirkian to counteract the Straussian influence...


I thought you meant Rahsaan Roland Kirk.



And Neil Strauss, the World's Most Successful Pick-Up Artist
 

gorgekko

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Originally Posted by JLibourel
I thought you meant Russell Kirk, rather than the Star Trek character. I once had lunch with Russell Kirk. He was a good deal less interesting in person than his writings had led me to expect, I regret to report.

Boring or not, I have to admit I am totally jealous.
 

lakewolf

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All that has confused me to the point that now I won't never buy a copy of "The Suit"
 

Spudbunny

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Originally Posted by grimslade

Most of his thoughts on these matters can be found in the audiotapes of his unpublished lectures, which still circulate like contraband among his followers.


For Strauss, these were actually transcripts of lectures, circulated as above.

Still, I like Walter Berns. I was glad to see him looking better last night at the Schlaes lecture. Gruff, often pleasant, and a Straussian for at least fifty years. Let's see Manton match that! (Yeah, I'm assuming that about a third of the posters on this thread were at AEI last night. Come on, now, who'll reveal the color of Mike Barone's pocket square?)

As for Manton, he is clearly a rationalist. I mean, clearly: he's written a crib, an abridgment of a practice. We are all new rulers, Manton is our Machiavelli. Read more about him in the second section of On Human Conduct, the work "almost left too late" by the greatest political philosopher of the twentieth century.
 

medwards

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Originally Posted by Spudbunny
Still, I like Walter Berns. I was glad to see him looking better last night at the Schlaes lecture. .

And I had thought The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression was about the evolution of the dimpled tie.
 

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