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Non-traditional, non "9-to-5" ways of earning a living.

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by bob99, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. Dakota rube

    Dakota rube Senior member

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    Sucks only for the portion of income you reported on. [​IMG]

    Also why risk landing in jail dealing meth when you can charge just as much for the same amount of work being a plumber or an electrician?


    In my experience, the IRS is way, way more upset over failure to report income than they are trying to slide a few extra deductions through. I recommend being very accurate on the first page of your 1040.

    As to dealing: you don't really understand the economics of the business, do you?
     
  2. facebookdigg123

    facebookdigg123 Senior member

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    make a really popular youtube channel and make a six fig salary
     
  3. Biscotti

    Biscotti Senior member

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    Bar-tender, waiter, police officer, professor, fireman, nurse, restaurant manager
     
  4. JoelF

    JoelF Senior member

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    Worked for myself for a lot of years, putting this or that together, somehow always made enough to survive. Now that I'm old I have a regular gig (still contract work but pretty steady). I like having a place to go, sitting in the cube shooting the shit, regular pay as long as I remember to send an invoice.
     
  5. Stazy

    Stazy Senior member

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    App developer.
    Trust fund payments.
     
  6. dtmt

    dtmt Senior member

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    A lot of companies these days offer things like flex time or telecommuting. Are there really still that many jobs (other than customer service/support etc) where you're really required to physically be at your desk exactly from 9am to 5pm?
     
  7. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    A lot of companies these days offer things like flex time or telecommuting. Are there really still that many jobs (other than customer service/support etc) where you're really required to physically be at your desk exactly from 9am to 5pm?

    The company that I work for is extremely strict about time. People have been fired for abusing it.
     
  8. Mr. White

    Mr. White Senior member

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    I haven't really had a 'boss' since my early '20s. Help run the family construction business most of the time, hustle side-jobs and Ebay for the rest of my income. I'm fairly poor and have no insurance - but I also have zero job-related stress and if I feel like taking the afternoon off to meditate or work on a personal project I usually can.

    Your family owns a construction business, yet you think you're "poor." You are mistaken. You are part of the upper class.
     
  9. dtmt

    dtmt Senior member

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    The company that I work for is extremely strict about time. People have been fired for abusing it.

    What industry/job function?
     
  10. HgaleK

    HgaleK Senior member

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    Your family owns a construction business, yet you think you're "poor." You are mistaken. You are part of the upper class.

    [​IMG]

    Safe bet that you have zero experience in construction?
     
  11. Wolfador

    Wolfador Senior member

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    I am an iOS (iPhone / iPad) developer on the side just as a hobby but I actually do make a few bucks a month from it. Usually do some freelance programming jobs on the side to make some fun money.
     
  12. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    What industry/job function?

    Nothing that I couldn't do anywhere else.
     
  13. mkarim

    mkarim Senior member

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    Yes, you can make more money. But you can also lose a lot. You keep your own hours, but you have no control over the ebb and flow of clients and revenue. Defenitely less security. Paying for benefits is a bitch.

    +1.

    Also you have to file taxes more often.
     
  14. Mr. White

    Mr. White Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Safe bet that you have zero experience in construction?


    First real job I ever had. Did some rough carpentry, painting, and floor finishing before that, though.

    Employees know they lack the means to be employers. Employers know it too, but act like complete jerks and run a line of BS like "hah you don't know anything (because you don't own anything)."
     
  15. HgaleK

    HgaleK Senior member

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    First real job I ever had. Did some rough carpentry, painting, and floor finishing before that, though.

    Employees know they lack the means to be employers. Employers know it too, but act like complete jerks and run a line of BS like "hah you don't know anything (because you don't own anything)."


    A lot employers lack the means to be employers. I couldn't tell you outside of Texas, but a lot of small to medium sized construction companies are taking jobs at a loss right now, plenty are working on bankrupting, and even those that are making it right now are struggling if they don't have government contracts. What the employer in a small business is making is dependent on how the company is structured, but it essentially comes down to profit, even in a situation where the owner is salaried. There are plenty of unprofitable construction companies, especially right now. It's really not difficult to be poor trying to keep an unprofitable company afloat. Many dudes fight to the last dollar to try and keep their baby running. It's not unheard of for struggling owners to take home less than their employees.

    I'm not saying the dude is poor (I don't know the man), but your statement about him being part of the upper class on the basis of his family having a company gives some credence to the mentality of "hah you don't know anything (because you don't own anything)."
     
  16. Mr. White

    Mr. White Senior member

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    Sure. Owning a semi or duplex or such generally means the bank owns it, while the employer or landlord or such makes little or no income off it. Even once it's paid off, the owner will use it as collateral on another loan. No debate there.

    In the end, the employer's son is the employer, while the employee's son is the employee. A perpetual class distinction.
     
  17. HgaleK

    HgaleK Senior member

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    Sure. Owning a semi or duplex or such generally means the bank owns it, while the employer or landlord or such makes little or no income off it. Even once it's paid off, the owner will use it as collateral on another loan. No debate there.
    I'd purposely left that area vague just so I could post a ridiculously condescending response when you didn't consider debt. You ruined it. Harumph [​IMG]
    I'll give you that one. Certain fields in construction have a significantly smaller class distinction than others though. Any field that requires a master's license to own a business will have owners that don't experience such a pronounced disconnect between themselves and the non office employees because they spent a minimum of 6 years doing that same work. Depending on the capacity that the owner's kid is working, his boss could be foreman and not his father, and done properly that should remove all class differences while on the clock. Granted, it doesn't look like milosz was part of the ground crew. I still maintain that he could be poor.
     
  18. pistolero

    pistolero Senior member

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    i always assumed it was doing what you used to do for 50 hours a week and then spending an extra 30 hours a week doing all the stuff your old company employed whole departments to deal with, accounting, payroll, legal, tax etc etc etc

    as much as i love the idea of working for myself, i hate the idea of dealing with all that stuff which i have no exeperience or interest in.


    This, +1000. I "ditched the 9 to 5", and "struck out on my own" into self-employment....and won a 9 to 10 (pm) job instead [​IMG] [​IMG] Being a boss, and responsible for other people's livelihoods, is a next level of stress I wasn't prepared for, and still not sure I want.
     
  19. passingtime

    passingtime Senior member

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    If you have a specialised skill that is valued being self-employed is well worthwhile. I freelanced for about 20 years and did very well at it. I reckon I earned comfortably three times more than a comparable employee. Typically this was working on 3 or 6 month assignments. If you have the right skill set and interview well you can be in work continuously - the longest I was ever out of work was a week (contracts didn't always quite line up). I farmed out the bookkeeping and accounts to an accountant so really there wasn't a lot to do with my company except spend it's money.

    My objection to employing people is that I don't want to be responsible for them if I screw up. The idea of my employees not making their mortgage payments because of me is not something I am comfortable with. I employed people for a couple of years and it went well but there was always the issue lurking at the back so in the end I got out. The whole admin side was a non-event - that was just sub-contracted (my hourly rate was higher than theirs so why waste my time?).
     
  20. KPO89

    KPO89 Senior member

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    This thread has managed to not be on topic at all.
     

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