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Non-Sweatshop companies?

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by imageWIS, Aug 21, 2007.

  1. KitAkira

    KitAkira Senior member

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    From what I've seen, only their most expensive and exclusive lines are produced in Italy, e.g. 'Giorgio Armani'. Pretty much everything else is made in China and similar e.g. 'Emporio Armani', 'Armani Collezioni' and 'Armani Jeans'. Many other famous luxury designer brands which have multiple lines are no better here either, e.g. Paul Smith and Ralph Lauren.
    Giorgio Armani (aka Collection aka Black Label), Armani Collezioni, Dolce&Gabbana (aka Black Label), D&G, Prada (aka Collection aka Black Label), Prada Linea Rossa are all big Italian brands with Italian production (mostly, you'll find that nearly all labels have pieces from China/developing nations these days) I have a problem with switching to cheaper production while increasing retail. I'm sure some of it has to do with increasing production costs as a whole, but not to the extent of +$100 increases per unit
     
  2. Peter1

    Peter1 Senior member

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    Giorgio Armani (aka Collection aka Black Label), Armani Collezioni, Dolce&Gabbana (aka Black Label), D&G, Prada (aka Collection aka Black Label), Prada Linea Rossa are all big Italian brands with Italian production (mostly, you'll find that nearly all labels have pieces from China/developing nations these days)

    I have a problem with switching to cheaper production while increasing retail. I'm sure some of it has to do with increasing production costs as a whole, but not to the extent of +$100 increases per unit


    Italian companies (some, not all) have developed the perfectly legit -- but NEVER disclosed -- practice of using inexpensive immigrant labor to make their products in Italy, thus keeping the "Made in Italy" cachet without paying the going rate for Italian labor.

    The above example is just to point out that labor is now like capital -- it flows freely across borders and is available to the highest bidder. Quality can be achieved anywhere; it's all up to the specs of the manufacturers. Sweatshops? Again, up to the individual company's conscience. The reason to buy MiUSA products is to keep as much capital here as possible. (Not that it's a bad one, but it's the only one defensible prima facie)

    There's nothing intrinsically better about American workers -- any human, properly trained, humanely treated and properly compensated, can do as well as his fellow man at his chosen career.
     
  3. Spencer

    Spencer Senior member

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    Apolis Activism was mentioned earlier, but they go above and beyond to make sure their products are ethically made.
     
  4. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    It has nothing to do with the country where it is made, it has everything to do with the factory conditions for the workers. There are many compliant companies in China and other third world countries. Support non-sweatshop but don't write off entire countries.
     
  5. London

    London Senior member

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    Hell. There are sweatshops in the garment district.
     
  6. michaeljkrell

    michaeljkrell Senior member

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    This is an interesting little read from BCG which basically says that within the next five years manufacturing will make a come back in the US, but just items that have modest production runs; clothing will still be made overseas for the foreseeable future. I still think there is a niche for more pattern-making, sample production, and small-run production manufacturers in the US... http://www.bcg.com/media/PressReleas...d=tcm:12-75973
     
  7. KitAkira

    KitAkira Senior member

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    There has been a push towards African production (new frontier, I suppose) and I haven't seen any drop in quality in those pieces. Morocco and Tunisia seem to be the up-and-comers
     
  8. michaeljkrell

    michaeljkrell Senior member

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    There has been a push towards African production (new frontier, I suppose) and I haven't seen any drop in quality in those pieces. Morocco and Tunisia seem to be the up-and-comers

    I had never heard of the country of Lesotho until I saw it on the tag of a t-shirt...
     
  9. pickpackpockpuck

    pickpackpockpuck Senior member

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    If you're looking for some companies to feel good about, check out UNIS and Baron Wells. And have a look at this blog: http://well-spent.com/

    Rag&Bone does make a lot of stuff in China and other countries now, and you'll notice that's reflected in the price and the tags inside the garment. A lot of their pieces now have a tag that just says "Tailored workwear" (as opposed to the "Handmade in New York" tag that you used to see more frequently on their stuff) and from what I can tell those tend to be made in China or other developing nations. The price is also lower on those pieces. Their Chinese-made, "Tailored workwear" denim, for instance, is generally $195, while the denim that still has "Handmade in New York" on the interior waistband is generally $295. I think R&B does still make some great stuff, but you have to check the label.

    Incidentally, I think it's funny that Levi's, the quintessential American brand, was recently listed among companies caught manufacturing their garments in third-world sweatshops. In a way, that's as American as apple pie (which is originally German).
     

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