Nominate the best posts on the forum and (maybe) win a prize - ongoing Front Page contest

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by LA Guy, Jul 5, 2012.

  1. KObalto

    KObalto Senior member

    Messages:
    4,310
    Likes Received:
    78
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008


  2. The Thin Man

    The Thin Man Senior member

    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    73
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    OK, F. Corbera (X Christina Lee) delivers a highly useful, perfect-for-the-front-page post: http://www.styleforum.net/t/308529/shirting-patterns-by-christina-lee#post_5609192

    This is by Christina Lee at Alexander West.

    Shirt Pattern List

    Many variations of the major patterns exist as designers are constantly trying to come up with new and different styles. Shirt patterns are often enhanced or can be a combination of different patterns. These are the classic pattern choices.

    CHECKS

    Gingham - Gingham usually comes in a checkered pattern and is distinguished by white and colored, even-sized checks. This pattern is formed by horizontal and vertical stripes (usually of the same color) that cross each other on a white background to form even checks. Gingham originated as a striped pattern when it was first imported in the 17th century and had become woven into a check pattern during the mid-18th century, with blue and white being the most popular choice in color.



    Madras - Madras is a pattern that originated in a city in East India, formerly named Madras. This summer fabric style is distinguished by a pattern of colorful checks and stripes. The stripes of a madras check or plaid consist of different colored stripes that cross each other to form uneven checks. Madras has become a popular “preppy” pattern for shorts and casual shirts.



    Tartan Plaid - Tartan plaid is the pattern that is most often found on Scottish kilts. This plaid consists of vertical and horizontal or diagonal stripes that cross each other to form different sized checks. This pattern is often done in a twill-weave and should only be used as a casual shirt.





    Shepherd’s check - This pattern is a twill-weave of small, even-sized, colored and white checks. While this check often resembles the gingham check, the visible twill weave is what distinguishes the shepherd’s check from gingham. The name derives from the plaid worn by shepherds in the hills of the Scottish borders. The hounds tooth pattern originated from the Shepherd’s check.



    Houndstooth - The houndstooth pattern has a similar pattern featured in the Shepherd’s check and Glen plaid. The checks that make up the houndstooth are broken/uneven and pointy-shaped (like a hound’s tooth). The houndstooth pattern is traditionally black and white but can be found in a variety of colors and on a variety of garments and accessories nowadays.



    Glen Plaid/Prince of Wales Check - Glen plaid, also known as the Prince of Wales check, is a pattern most commonly found in suits. It is woven in a twill pattern and consists of broken checks where a conglomerate of alternating dark stripes and light stripes cross each other to create a pattern of small and large checks. This pattern is usually done in a muted color with white.



    Windowpane Check - The windowpane check is a pattern that resembles the pattern of panes on a window. The stripes that cross to form windowpane checks are often thicker and farther apart than the pattern found in graph checks.



    Graph Check - This is a check pattern that resembles the crossing lines of graph paper. The graph check pattern is characterized by solid, thin, single-colored stripes that cross each other to form even and small-sized checks. The stripes that create a graph check are thinner than the stripes in a windowpane check.



    Tattersall - Tatersall is a check pattern that consists of thin, regularly spaced stripes in alternating colors that are repeated both horizontally and vertically. The stripes that create the tatersall pattern often come in two different colors and are usually darker than the background color.



    Mini-check - This is a pattern consisting of very small and even sized checks. It usually consists of one color with white and often resembles the gingham check-except that it’s a lot smaller. This pattern is more casual than stripes, but dressier than larger checks.



    Pin check - is is a pattern created by pin sized stripes (about 1 yarn thick) that cross to form tiny checks that look like dots to the human eye. This pattern often consists of one color with white. This small check effect gives the shirt a textured solid effect.




    STRIPES

    Awning Stripe - Awning stripes are the widest sized stripes that can be found on shirts. These vertical and even stripes are often wider than ¼” and usually consist of solid colored stripes on white. The name derives from the wide stripe pattern found on awning fabrics. Wider stripes tend to be used mostly for casual shirts.



    Bengal - Bengal stripes vertical stripes that are narrower than awning stripes but wider than candy stripes (approximately ¼” in width). Bengal stripes usually consist of solid colored stripes on white.



    Candy Stripe - Candy stripes are vertical and even stripes that are wider than pencil stripes but thinner than Bengal stripes. Candy stripes are usually about 1/8” in width and are characterized by solid, bold stripes on white. The name derives from the stripe pattern found on stick candy.



    Pencil Stripe - Pencil stripes, also referred to as dress stripes, are often thinner than candy stripes but wider than pinstripes. The width between the stripes varies from shirt to shirt and the stripes are almost always uneven (more white than color).



    Pin stripe - Pin stripes are thin, vertical stripes that are narrower than pencil stripes. Pin stripes are usually one to two yarns thick and are sometimes broken. The widths between the stripes vary but are always wider apart than hairline stripes.



    Hairline Stripe - Hairline stripes are thin stripes that are about the width of a hair. Hairline stripes are spaced very close together which gives the shirt a textured solid effect. This effect makes this a flexible pattern for shirts.



    Bar Code Stripe - The bar code stripe pattern consists of different sized stripes that are closely spaced together. This pattern resembles the lines on a bar code-hence its name. Bar code stripes usually consist of 2 colors or varied tones of one color.



    Shadow Stripe - Shadow stripes consist of vertical stripes with another stripe directly adjacent to it or bordering it- creating a shadow effect. Shadow stripes generally vary in width and usually consist of two or three different colors.






    Special thanks to Nicole Kabbaz for working with us on putting this list together.

    Researched and written by Christina Lee.
    I couldn't get the photos in the spoilered text, but they're very good.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2012


  3. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    34,599
    Likes Received:
    12,142
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    

    I disagree with pretty much all of this, though I suspect that I'm not going to be able to convince the poster that this is true. I'm going to quickly address points 2, 3, and 4) before going back to 1).
    2) The snark levels have always varied, as has the rudeness levels. If you look at the earliest, developmental stages of the forum (say, 2002-2004) there is very little in the way of snark, and a lot more in the way of gentle and earnest advice. During the really large growth periods (2007-2011), when traffic and posting increased by about 100%+ per year, the snarkiness and honestly, general nastiness levels also varied.
    3) The fact is that there were many more vendors (though they did not pay any fee at that time) in about 2004-2005 than there are today.
    4) Blogging and Tumblr are great for broadcasting a specific point of view. Neither are particularly good for conversations. This is the strength of discussion forums, which are a very old technology. Twitter gets it better, but the 140 character limit really limits the conversations to snippets and bon mots. It's not enough. People want to converse in long forum with one another. The points in the post above, for example, could not be made on twitter in any sensible fashion.

    Now, onto 1)

    There are plenty of things to talk about, but which people do not, or at least not on a regular basis. A few topics that I can think of off the top of my head which would lend themselves to good discussion topics:

    i) The emergence online MTM outfits and how that impacts on traditional tailors and shirtmakers.
    ii) How have traditional haberdashers been responding to pressure from the internet, and what adjustments have they been making best use of their natural advantages (this discussion was had over in SW&D, and a similar, but even more important, discussion could be had here, for a number of reasons.)
    iii) The balance between increasing and having smarter PR, marketing, and adjusting to the changing needs of the market (personally, I think that PR is what is needed, and that outfits like Gieves and Hawkes chose the wrong approach, while firms like Trickers and John Lobb chose the right path.)

    And these are just topics in which I am personally interested, since I am interested in the digital landscape and in the business of clothing.

    There are lots of topics about production (like the rampant abuse of the "Super" system, and tricks that mills use to get a higher number, at the detriment of their product; can a machine actually be constructed to do true pickstitching, and can it be cost effective) trends (how did Neapolitan tailoring become so popular, compared to say, English? Are young workers being found to replace old workers. Why or why not? Contrast tailoring with watchmaking, etc...)

    Anyway, back on topic. Let's see what we've come up with in the past year. I challenge you to find the cool discussions and interesting photologs, and to start more new and interesting discussions. Let's try to get a winning post or two from MC.
     


  4. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    34,599
    Likes Received:
    12,142
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    

    It should be noted that analogous conversations can be had here. For example, "blogger blue" did not appear out of nowhere. Next summer, you'll be seeing a more subdued blue that has neither a lot of purples nor greens, but has more grey. Chisel toes have been replaced to a large degree with more round toe shoes. Trends occur in tailored clothing and accessories. And online shopping is happening in tailored clothing more and more, and the technology for getting proper measurements is getting better and better.
     


  5. unbelragazzo

    unbelragazzo Jewfro Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    8,365
    Likes Received:
    4,552
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    



    I'm interested in this too. I thought William Field's answer from my interview with him was interesting:

    What's the difference between bespoke and made-to-measure? Why is it so hard for the online sites doing made-to-measure to replicate the fit of true bespoke?

    They're not really seeing the person's form. Measuring someone is not just a snapshot. As you're measuring someone, you're asking them about styling, measuring them again, seeing how they move. And at some point in that measuring process, they'll relax a little bit, and then you'll really get to see their form. They're not ramrod straight anymore or sucking in their gut so much, they're relaxed a bit more, and you'll really see the pitch. Maybe they seem down right a half an inch, which is typical, but then they relax and you'll see, it's really three-quarters of an inch. So those computers, like the ones that will do a scan of you, measure you in a static pose, and when you're not very relaxed. Then when you relax, the suit's not going to fit anymore. Then when it gets to the maker, say in China, they'll sort of look at the numbers, and say oh, let's use, say this pattern, a block pattern. Then they finish it up, send it off, and that's it, without any fittings. And they'll probably never see that suit again, because who's going to send it back to China for alterations and deal with all the back and forth?
     


  6. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    34,599
    Likes Received:
    12,142
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    

    I agree with this, personally, but I also wonder how much consumers care, or can be made to care, and where does price become too much of a consideration. Think you could make this into a new thread, and we can start this conversations again?

    Cheers,


    Fok.
     


  7. The Thin Man

    The Thin Man Senior member

    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    73
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Here's a good post from the "Maomao x Gaz Sartorial Adventure 2012" thread. I can't remember if this was already on the front page: http://www.styleforum.net/t/301187/maomao-x-gaz-italian-sartorial-adventure-2012/45#post_5514251

     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2012


  8. The Thin Man

    The Thin Man Senior member

    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    73
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    T4phage introduces the forum to Passaggio Cravatte: http://www.styleforum.net/t/279022/new-ties#post_5036594

     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2012


  9. The Thin Man

    The Thin Man Senior member

    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    73
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Here's a good one from Montesquieu tonight: http://www.styleforum.net/t/308717/bespoke-bicycles#post_5612015

     


  10. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    34,599
    Likes Received:
    12,142
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    I do like these. I especially like the Mao Mao one. Will probably use that, and put it up with the "thread of the month" contenders. I'm sorta thinking either Drakes scarves or ties for the winners. Maybe scarves, since you really need one when it's 90F outside.
     


  11. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    34,599
    Likes Received:
    12,142
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho


  12. The Thin Man

    The Thin Man Senior member

    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    73
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    Another good post from edmorel: http://www.styleforum.net/t/308954/on-solid-and-solid-like-jackets-shirts-ties#post_5617445

     


  13. The Thin Man

    The Thin Man Senior member

    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    73
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    And another from Gazman (not to get repetitive): http://www.styleforum.net/t/301187/maomao-x-gaz-italian-sartorial-adventure-2012/105#post_5615436

     


  14. SpooPoker

    SpooPoker Internet Bigtimer and Most Popular Man on Campus Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    36,388
    Likes Received:
    37,050
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2009
    Location:
    LuxeSwap


  15. jrd617

    jrd617 Senior member

    Messages:
    14,725
    Likes Received:
    2,328
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2009


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by