• We would like to welcome Pete and Harry as an official Affiliate Vendor. Pete and Harry, co-founded by Erik (EFV) one of our long time members and friends, offers a wide variety of products, clothes, watches and accessories, antique, vintage, “pre-loved” and new - all at unparalleled prices. Please visit their new thread and give them a warm welcome.

  • STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

No more low rise trousers!

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Messages
24,160
Reaction score
60,433
I think the latest iteration started with McQueen, who designed the style for women, and then it was later imported into menswear through Hedi Slimane.

Ultimately, elements of a silhouette have to work in concert. Around the late 90s/ early 2000s, the suit started shrinking -- buttoning points got pushed higher, hems got raised, collars shrunk, pants slimmed, trouser hems went up, and the overall silhouette just got tinier and tinier. In this sense, it makes sense to wear low rise trousers because it's in concert with everything else.

That said, I'm obviously not a fan of any of those looks -- short jackets, small collars, high buttoning points, etc. I think it works for a very small number of men who are stick thin, live in big cities, and want to look fashionable. But the silhouette doesn't work for most men because it just doesn't flatter their build.

Trouser silhouettes are filling out again. You see it everywhere with Lemaire, Raf, and others. With that comes a higher rise because, again, details have to work in concert. You don't see many full-legged, low-rise trousers, just as you don't see high-rise skinny trousers.

Tailoring is supposedly immune from trends, but when I was at an Anderson & Sheppard trunk show once, I talked to John Malone, the company's trouser cutter. He's been with the company for many decades. He told me that trousers silhouettes have also followed along with fashion, albeit much more slowly. These days, he cuts a slimmer trouser than what he did in the 90s, although still not approximating anything like what you see in lower-end OTR clothes.

As the runway fashion trickles down again, my guess is that you will see the pendulum swing the other way in the next 15 years -- trickling down to J. Crew and Uniqlo, ultimately affecting what tailors cut, and how people on the street dress. Then in 20 years, we'll see another reversion to slim, lower rise trousers.

Of course, the better way forward is to figure out what fits and flatters your build, and what creates a sensible silhouette for your body type. But this often requires going to a custom tailor, which can be expensive.
 

TheSartorialPunjabi

Active Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2021
Messages
29
Reaction score
21
I think the latest iteration started with McQueen, who designed the style for women, and then it was later imported into menswear through Hedi Slimane.

Ultimately, elements of a silhouette have to work in concert. Around the late 90s/ early 2000s, the suit started shrinking -- buttoning points got pushed higher, hems got raised, collars shrunk, pants slimmed, trouser hems went up, and the overall silhouette just got tinier and tinier. In this sense, it makes sense to wear low rise trousers because it's in concert with everything else.

That said, I'm obviously not a fan of any of those looks -- short jackets, small collars, high buttoning points, etc. I think it works for a very small number of men who are stick thin, live in big cities, and want to look fashionable. But the silhouette doesn't work for most men because it just doesn't flatter their build.

Trouser silhouettes are filling out again. You see it everywhere with Lemaire, Raf, and others. With that comes a higher rise because, again, details have to work in concert. You don't see many full-legged, low-rise trousers, just as you don't see high-rise skinny trousers.

Tailoring is supposedly immune from trends, but when I was at an Anderson & Sheppard trunk show once, I talked to John Malone, the company's trouser cutter. He's been with the company for many decades. He told me that trousers silhouettes have also followed along with fashion, albeit much more slowly. These days, he cuts a slimmer trouser than what he did in the 90s, although still not approximating anything like what you see in lower-end OTR clothes.

As the runway fashion trickles down again, my guess is that you will see the pendulum swing the other way in the next 15 years -- trickling down to J. Crew and Uniqlo, ultimately affecting what tailors cut, and how people on the street dress. Then in 20 years, we'll see another reversion to slim, lower rise trousers.

Of course, the better way forward is to figure out what fits and flatters your build, and what creates a sensible silhouette for your body type. But this often requires going to a custom tailor, which can be expensive.
I couldn’t agree more.
 

comrade

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 10, 2005
Messages
7,661
Reaction score
1,252
No need to apologize. Maybe thinking more about a subject is a good use of
anyone's time.
 
Last edited:

Phileas Fogg

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
4,075
Reaction score
3,755
For the record, I believe the low rise fad has all but jumped the shark.

RL is bringing back forward pleats and a regular rise.
 

TheSartorialPunjabi

Active Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2021
Messages
29
Reaction score
21
No need to apologize. Maybe thing more about a subject is a good use of
anyone's time.
I’m not even talking about the history of low rise, you’re just trying to pick an argument with me about a small issue. I didn’t mean to upset you and your love of low rise trousers. And if I did do my research, it would more well detailed, but like I said, I’m not talking about the history of low rise trousers. I’m just talking about my experience. Also, when I did my research, I did stumble on the fact of when it was created, but I’m talking about what is happening now, the current trend. If you take the time to read carefully, then maybe you can see what I’m talking about. So please leave me alone about this small issue. Thank you!
 

jack webb

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
139
Reaction score
182
It seems to me low-rise trousers flatter aspects of the physique that generally don't improve as years accumulate. They may look good on you at some point in life, but you eventually age out of them.
 

Nobilis Animus

Timed Out
Timed Out
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
2,660
Reaction score
2,322
As the runway fashion trickles down again, my guess is that you will see the pendulum swing the other way in the next 15 years -- trickling down to J. Crew and Uniqlo, ultimately affecting what tailors cut, and how people on the street dress. Then in 20 years, we'll see another reversion to slim, lower rise trousers.
Thankfully, J Crew is no more, so at least we'll be spared that iteration of horrible.
 

Nobilis Animus

Timed Out
Timed Out
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
2,660
Reaction score
2,322
Last edited:

comrade

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 10, 2005
Messages
7,661
Reaction score
1,252
As I said earlier, I wear "short rise" no more than 10.5 in usually a bit lower even on dress slacks.
When they are hard to find, I have them made, as I did once. Or I have them altered- which requires
a very competent tailor. MTM for Zanella, through Saks failed. I received a complete refund. For RTW
suits I have the trousers re-cut.
 

Mirage-

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2021
Messages
191
Reaction score
192
Trouser silhouettes are filling out again. You see it everywhere with Lemaire, Raf, and others. With that comes a higher rise because, again, details have to work in concert. You don't see many full-legged, low-rise trousers, just as you don't see high-rise skinny trousers.
Not sure if that counts, but every single brand here in Italy carries high rise skinny jeans....for women, though. For men, it's almost impossible to get standard rise in jeans, and high rise is completely impossible I think.
Regarding non-jeans, women still have high rise options, though the fashion seems to be skinny for jeans, flared for trousers. In fact I have seen several "skinny-flared" fits.
 

Phileas Fogg

Distinguished Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2020
Messages
4,075
Reaction score
3,755
Not sure if that counts, but every single brand here in Italy carries high rise skinny jeans....for women, though. For men, it's almost impossible to get standard rise in jeans, and high rise is completely impossible I think.
Regarding non-jeans, women still have high rise options, though the fashion seems to be skinny for jeans, flared for trousers. In fact I have seen several "skinny-flared" fits.
here in the states, the trend for women’s jeans is trending toward a looser fit. The “boyfriend” fit seems to be making a come back.
 

Featured Sponsor

LARGE METAL WATCHES WITH TAILORING

  • Yes, I’m tacky like that.

  • No way José! Dress watch with leather strap for me!

  • No watch at all.


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
465,842
Messages
10,063,732
Members
210,125
Latest member
stretch55
Top