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Nicholas Templeman: A Bespoke Shoemaker

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by dieworkwear, May 26, 2015.

  1. ThinkDerm

    ThinkDerm Stylish Dinosaur

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  2. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Mahatma Jawndi

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    New Travel Schedule

    Boston
    2nd & 3rd of October
    Eliot Hotel, Commonwealth Avenue

    New York City
    4th & 5th of October
    The Benjamin, E50th & Lexington

    San Francisco
    6th & 7th of October
    InterContinental Mark Hopkins, Nob Hill


    I imagine you can contact Nicholas through his website for appointments:
    http://www.nicholastempleman.com/
     

  3. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Mahatma Jawndi

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    These look so good. I might have to copy ...

    Screen Shot 2018-09-12 at 3.05.25 PM.png
     

  4. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Mahatma Jawndi

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    Hey look, Nicholas is the cover story for the latest issue of Last!

    Anyone read/ write Japanese and want to translate?

    DrTziR9WkAEkACi (1).jpg xMxm4n4V.jpg hsgQByjf.jpg
     

  5. usctrojans31

    usctrojans31 Distinguished Member

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    My Japanese is a bit rusty, but I believe it says, "To celebrate this cover, Nicholas Templeman, one of the world's great bespoke shoemakers will gift every member of Styleforum a pair of bespoke shoes."
     

  6. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior Member

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    Is anyone here experienced with Japanese contract law?
     

  7. Andy57

    Andy57 Distinguished Member

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    I can confirm the accuracy of that translation.

    Why, yes. Yes I am. What would you like to know?
     

  8. bamboo

    bamboo Senior Member

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  9. Nick V.

    Nick V. Distinguished Member Dubiously Honored

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    Congratulations Nicholas!
     

  10. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior Member

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    Thanks very much
     

  11. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior Member

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    Amazon.jp don’t mess around on the re-up, they shipped this copy to me in 2 days

    4B86BE3F-3756-40B7-970D-6C29A7C59A98.jpeg EF16CD9E-874E-40E6-AF93-0D7BEE7558CD.jpeg 5DD31F80-801E-4D60-B5E7-FD5E1FEF4BCB.jpeg 86716F2D-BCDF-430F-8802-AA33EC840898.jpeg
     

  12. bamboo

    bamboo Senior Member

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    Hi. I translated the article to English. It is not a refined translation but should be understandable. I translated main isody only which is written vertically. I enjoyed reading and translating it.

    Translation begins below.

    =======================
    Everybody knows there are some shoe makers with a long history in London which is considered to be one of the original place of bespoke shoemaking. It looks probably due to prominence of those shoemaking houses, there were not many new independent shoe makers arising there. However, recently we started to hear the name of new independent makers from London. Mr. Nicholas Templeman whom I visited for this interview is one of such makers.

    We agreed to meet at Highgate station of the tube (zone 3). It is located in northern part of London residential area. A British gentleman in his 30’s appears in front of me. He took us to his workshop situated at 2nd floor of his residence which is about 10 minutes’ drive from the station. It has a good view of lawn garden and trees and is in a relaxing environment.

    Mr. Templeman started his own shoe brand in 2014. This November made a full four year mark of his brand. Prior to his own endeavour, he was working in John Lobb in London as a last maker. He studied fine arts in college majoring print making and screen print.

    He said “I considered becoming a tailor before going to college, as I liked clothing. I also liked shoes. When I was at a 2nd year at the college, I happened to find a shoe shop on the way back from the school. It was a shoe retail shop but shoe making tools and lasts were on display. I felt an intuition then shoe making must be interesting. “

    It was a beginning of millennium and there was a growing use of Internet. He began searching information on the net and learnt about famous shoe makers such as John Lobb, Foster and Son and George Clerverly.

    Upon graduation, he returned to London and on his rather casual visit to John Lobb came to know that the shoe maker was recruiting an apprentice. He then decided to join John Lobb and after two years of apprenticeship, he became a last maker of the house.

    From outside, being John Lobb’s last maker sounds like a star job in the industry. However, he decided to resign after working there for five years as a last maker.

    “Working environment was good at John Lobb. I had a sense that my work was needed there too, but I could not continue it anymore. I started feel frustrated of making lasts everyday in a way already predetermined without my own freedom of making decisions. If you consider it just as a job without passion for the shoes, it is OK, but I had a passion for the shoes and my own vision. I wanted to have a control so I decided to quit and start on my own.”

    He said “After becoming independent I have been enjoying many phases of shoe making including seeing customers.” Immediately after resigning from John Lobb, he setup a bench for last making, made sample shoes, opened web site and SNS accounts. He started to receive inquiries from US and had a trunk show there. US still accounts for 60% of his client base.

    Traditional Technique plus Creativity.

    In his workshop, he makes last, draw patterns and “clicks” the leather. Then he asks his outworkers to stitch uppers and send uppers and sole materials to bottom makers who are also outworkers. This process is no different from other bespoke shoe makers in London including John Lobb. He also uses a paper tape to measure customer feet as is done at John Lobb because “It is the best method.” He measures four points instead of three of John Lobb though.

    “All handsewn welted shoes are basically made in a same way, so there may not be a much difference of making. This is an already established method based on tradition and need to be kept this way. You can consider it like a swordsmith of Japanese sword. What is important to me is to add something new and applicable to modern life to the traditional craftsmanship. “

    He also mentions that he is not just seeking after so called British style. “I believe my customers came to me because they want something different from traditional style found in Foster and Son or George Cleverly.” Coming into line what he says I found there are some lasts of sleek toe shape on the floor of his workshop. “These are trial lasts of attempting a different toe shape from traditional British one based on my foot. I am always looking for something new and sometimes make samples looking at French or Japanese shoes. This particular last has a French influence but something more moderate might work better.”

    He showed me another last of very fine foot asking if I am interested? “This is William Lobb’s last. I made a replica of his last myself for study purpose. Front part of the shoe is rather short and based on more traditional balance.”

    Hearing Mr. Templeman explaining to me, I sensed a beyond time connection between the legendary shoe maker William Lobb, creator of the famous double monk and the man in front of me. I think I saw the inheritance of the creativity from one to the other.
     

  13. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior Member

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    Thank you so very much for taking the time to translate, I really appreciate it!
     

  14. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Mahatma Jawndi

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    These look really good

    DrqALE6WsAEgGnK.jpg
     

  15. Zapasman

    Zapasman Distinguished Member

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    Really,really beautiful. It is outstanding the way he selects/cuts the hide parts of the exotics for his patterns to make a very beautiful,refine and apelling shoe. Perfection. Bravo Maestro.!!
     

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