New York Times Article: Suits in Scorsese's "Wolf of Wall Street"

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by jrd617, Dec 24, 2013.

  1. jrd617

    jrd617 Senior member

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    Interesting article. Especially the part about how the wardrobe was thoroughly researched to add to the 80s overindulgence vibe of the movie.

    I think it wrongly generalizes about "the dress code for men steering away from displays of conspicuous sartorial consumption" since the 1980s.

    Sure, the proportions of suits changed (long gone are "Armani shoulders" and full chests). And pinstripes are now shunned as very "1%". But there are lots of #menswear peacocks in their 20s and 30s days. Isn't that just a different kind of "conspicuous sartorial consumption"?

    Also, the forum's own NMWA is mentioned about halfway down the article. :slayer:



     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2013
  2. gdl203

    gdl203 Affiliate Vendor Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    I was surprised to see that the article was up yesterday - I was told it may get published on the 26th (I think that's still the case for the print version)

    [​IMG]
     
  3. gdl203

    gdl203 Affiliate Vendor Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    Not that many on Wall Street though (which was the topic of the article). The #menswear movement and renaissance of suits, sport coats, ties and pocket squares is very interesting in that it turned people who would otherwise not need to dress formally into more formal dressers, incorporating elements of traditional dress codes into a fashion-oriented vision of style. Some do it well, others go a bit too far for our classic menswear eyes.

    A lot of what I said did not make it to the article, but what you've seen on Wall St over the last 6-7 years with the general trend towards dressing "humbly" has been quite fascinating to watch. Most of the top earners, group heads, etc... are careful about not dressing too well. Ubiquitous Patek and Audemars have been traded across the board for black plastic Iron Man watches in a (ridiculous but maybe effective) effort to look the part in front of clients whose business has struggled, or even the general public post-Occupy WS. I remember an article a few years ago about Lloyd Blankfein and his carefully selected suits that make him look like an average joe rather than one of the most important men in the financial system (doing G_d's work of course ;p )
     
  4. jrd617

    jrd617 Senior member

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    They do mention Theory and Ludlow suits being popular. Overly tight suits strike me as being very conspicuous. Even in sedate fabrics. And they also mention other #menswear trimmings like fun socks and chambray shirts.
     
  5. ter1413

    ter1413 Senior member

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    Last edited: Dec 26, 2013
  6. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    the article is not well written

    I have been in the trade for over 30 years.

    I have different views on almost everything written.
    I used to sell shirts to the kids working boiler rooms both downtown and midtown.
    from the really down and dirty ones run by young Russian kids with mob connections
    to those run by once legitimate banker/brokers, who were lured by the fast money!!

    disclaimer: I made the shirts for DeCaprio and Jonah Hill, as well as a few others.
     
  7. jrd617

    jrd617 Senior member

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    ^ awesome about making the shirts for the movie.

    I always enjoy hearing who you've made shirts for. Too bad about that client who you think got "shipped upstate", but I remember laughing about that euphemism
     
  8. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    i think he gets out soon!

    I have not seen the movie yet.
    I saw american Hustle.
    the clothing and hair for that movie is even better!
     
  9. Len

    Len Well-Known Member

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    I was traveling from London to NYC and beyond during the crazy "80's. And crazy it was. I set up shop at the Inter-Continental hotel and shared a suite with my good friend Keith Fallan. We did most of our business between 7 and 10pm. the traders and dealers were far too busy to come and see us during working hours. We would have as many as 15 men in the hotel room at one time. Every one of them still "up" from a day of hectic work and each one demanding individual attention. Keith and I would sell and fit all at the same time. We had an ashtray into which we would scrape our chalk dust when we sharpened them. we could have made a fortune. So many of these guys, who were so used to seeing cocaine in piles, thought it was cocaine and wanted to buy a line!! The other comment we received was that we should hide it from the hotel staff as they would probably steal it. To them, this was clearly a common sight. It was crazy, it was fun and it was quite lucrative.

    I was contacted by Sandy Powell, the costume designer for the Wolf of Wall Street, to make the tailored clothing for Dicaprio and a number of the other stars. She knew that, as they prospered, the traders portrayed had upgraded their wardrobes and so wanted me for this reason.

    Logsdail
     
  10. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Len
    you had a more upscale crowd then mine.

    I was not sure how some of my customers could even pass the Series 7 test.
    I went to the offices on either the 1st or the 15th , and was paid in cash!
    Carl
     
  11. YRR92

    YRR92 Senior member

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    This is a wonderful thread. I hope you all don't mind if I throw out some questions.

    Can I ask how much direction you get, as specialized clothiers, when you work on a film project? I presume there's some direction, but how "managed" are you? Is there some discretion as to particular styling choices or cloths used, or is it pretty firmly laid-out?
     
  12. Cantabrigian

    Cantabrigian Senior member

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    :lol:
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2013
  13. Len

    Len Well-Known Member

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    Ha Ha. I saw the odd briefcase full of cash!!
     
  14. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    The direction on how to fit and style usually comes from the costume designer.

    they often ask for our input.


    Len may agree with me on this.
    We did some fittings for a recent production.
    the costume designer is up in years.
    this was a period production and the designer kept referencing different time periods.


    sometimes collars and lapels on 70's productions are reduced so they do not look so clownish.

    Just watch American Hustle!

    Fabrics are important.

    On film, white shirts are tea dipped so they are not so white.
    there is almost always surface interest on the fabric or at least some sort of multi- stripe.

    Most Actors are easy to fit and work with.
    it is just the few that are so awful, that it gives you second thoughts on your chosen career.
     
  15. Len

    Len Well-Known Member

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    I ALWAYS ask the designer if they would like my input. Mostly they say yes. That said, i am fully aware that I work for them, not for the actor. They usually arrive at my store with a folder of research photographs from the era in which the movie will be set. We discuss styles and then I show what I think would be appropriate fabrics. This is often a 2-meeting process. Only once we are all on the same page do I then meet the actor. By that time it's a matter of measuring and telling him what is going on and, often, giving him the opportunity of having a say in the fabric selection. But it really depends on the movie and the actor. THere's a movie coming out on valentines Day that I made clothes for that is set in 1920. So it's fabric, costume and, because of one of the main actors, a lot of his input,too.

    In direct answer to your question I would say it's a definite collaboration (they would not come and see me if I had no mind of my own) but the costume designer has the final word. She, or he, is my boss during the course of any movie and, when it comes down to it, I create what i am told. Now sometimes there might be a slight shoulder adjustment, lapel adjustment of lengthening or shortening of a coat depending on whether the movie is set in one particular year or spans a decade or two. It's where the skill of the tailor comes in. he cannot be firmly set in his way of making and has to have the ability and willingness to take direction and make what is asked.

    Logsdail
     

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