1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

New study shows income is closely tied to choice of major. Your barista agrees.

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by FLMountainMan, May 25, 2011.

  1. Gene Parmesan

    Gene Parmesan Active Member

    Messages:
    43
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2011
    As an Economics undergrad at a top UK university, it's funny seeing pretty much everyone I know, at the age of 20/21, getting job offers with starting salaries in the region of £45,000 (~$75,000 given the current exchange rate, but it corresponds to a little bit more than that in reality). Pretty crazy money, and makes you realise how fortunate you are.
     
  2. KPO89

    KPO89 Senior member

    Messages:
    964
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2009
    Location:
    The SunnierSide of Queens
    Your career is like marrying for love or money...

    Love: education, journalism, etc.

    Money: Law, Comp Sci, could argue business

    I would assume there is a dramatic inflation of these numbers now that college education is so cheap and practically attainable by all.
     
  3. bringusingoodale

    bringusingoodale Senior member

    Messages:
    1,491
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2010
    Location:
    Disputed Zone
    This article is perpetuating the myth that a college education will guarantee gainful employment or big bucks, even if it isn't its intent.

    I'd like to see one of these analysis compare what a tradesman makes. I know people who never went to college and learned HVAC, worked second jobs and made savvy investments and are now worth way more than any one I know who holds a bachelor's.
     
  4. unjung

    unjung Senior member

    Messages:
    6,544
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2008
    Location:
    The beach
    Clinical psychology doesn't require a medical degree, it requires a ph.d or a psy.d. A psychatrist requires a medical degree.

    This article is perpetuating the myth that a college education will guarantee gainful employment or big bucks, even if it isn't its intent.

    I'd like to see one of these analysis compare what a tradesman makes. I know people who never went to college and learned HVAC, worked second jobs and made savvy investments and are now worth way more than any one I know who holds a bachelor's.


    All depends on where you are. I graduated from high school with kids who owned vacation homes and Porsches at 25, all because they went into welding in the oil patch. That said, some of them are ass-deep in debt.
     
  5. 1969

    1969 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,662
    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    Virtually no unemployment in Drugs, War and Oil. That says a lot.
     
  6. joelmthw

    joelmthw Senior member

    Messages:
    128
    Joined:
    May 16, 2010
    Location:
    ATL
    most girls go to college to get that MRS degree anyway
     
  7. Dashaansafin

    Dashaansafin Senior member

    Messages:
    1,850
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2008
    I love people who tried to convince me to become a psych major.


    "Omg you learn how people THINK! You can then manipulate them and then take control of them! This is your path to the big bucks and business!!!111!!!

    So retarded.
     
  8. thenanyu

    thenanyu Senior member

    Messages:
    2,380
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Your career is like marrying for love or money...

    Love: education, journalism, etc.

    Money: Law, Comp Sci, could argue business

    I would assume there is a dramatic inflation of these numbers now that college education is so cheap and practically attainable by all.


    That's like not true at all.
     
  9. otc

    otc Senior member

    Messages:
    14,206
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    I'd rather see lifetime earnings figures (with school costs subtracted)--some professions have very different salary ramps (especially if you spend a bunch of time getting a phd, doing a post doc, and turn 33 before you start earning more than a stipend).

    Also why no econ? It is definitely not the same thing as business and it would be a shame to include it in "social sciences"
     
  10. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

    Messages:
    14,187
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    I doubled majored in pottery and unemployment.
     
  11. holymadness

    holymadness Senior member

    Messages:
    3,673
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2008
    Location:
    Montreal
    StephenHero thinks that the only degree allowed should be a bachelor's of making money.
     
  12. imschatz

    imschatz Senior member

    Messages:
    895
    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    Your career is like marrying for love or money...

    Love: education, journalism, etc.

    Money: Law, Comp Sci, could argue business

    I would assume there is a dramatic inflation of these numbers now that college education is so cheap and practically attainable by all.

    Not true .. If you don't love computer coding, good luck completing a degree in CS. I thought I loved it - got through 4-5 courses and changed majors. Turns out I can only tolerate small amounts of computer programming if the end goal is extremely clear (statistical software for example).

    Law and Business .. ya, pretty sure those that love Law/Business are out numbered 20:1 by those that just do it for the money.
     
  13. imschatz

    imschatz Senior member

    Messages:
    895
    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2010
    Location:
    Canada
    I'd rather see lifetime earnings figures (with school costs subtracted)--some professions have very different salary ramps (especially if you spend a bunch of time getting a phd, doing a post doc, and turn 33 before you start earning more than a stipend).

    Also why no econ? It is definitely not the same thing as business and it would be a shame to include it in "social sciences"


    Ya .. sort of sad they keep throwing Economics in with the "Social Sciences" .. Earning potential of a Economics grad should be significantly higher then a Sociology or Poli-Sci student.
     
  14. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

    Messages:
    14,187
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2009
    StephenHero thinks that the only degree allowed should be a bachelor's of self-sufficiency.
    fyp [​IMG]
     
  15. vaalbara

    vaalbara Senior member

    Messages:
    477
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2010
    Location:
    DC
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Jr Mouse

    Jr Mouse Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    17,421
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2009
    Location:
    All of time and space, everything that ever was or
    Well, clinical psychology is an actual medical profession (with attendant wages) and requires a medical degree.

    But yeah, taking a 4-year psych degree and then stopping is not the best way to have a lucrative career. On the other hand, I know a lot of people working in journalism or education who love their jobs and pity corporate lawyers and financial managers who work 80 hours a week and have no life, vacation, or hobbies.


    Agreed. Money is important, but it's not everything to everyone. If you are passionate about a career field that does not pay that well, you may choose to give up a higher potential salary for it. There is nothing wrong with that at all, if you know what you are getting into.
     
  17. otc

    otc Senior member

    Messages:
    14,206
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    Agreed. Money is important, but it's not everything to everyone. If you are passionate about a career field that does not pay that well, you may choose to give up a higher potential salary for it. There is nothing wrong with that at all, if you know what you are getting into.

    Just like not everybody is willing to do what at least a few members on here do and work in petroleum where you run a several weeks on, several weeks off schedule in some god forsaken place in exchange for a bunch of money.

    I think I would like it for several years. I'm not someone who needs to see my friends in person daily or something, and as long as the work location and other staff were reasonably consistent (not a new city every week or something) where I could have a stable life in both places...
    Basically gives you long chunks of time to do stuff other people can't do (and money to do so)...who is that member that decided to buy a ducati, had a friend in CA buy it, picked it up, and drove it cross country to new york with several unplanned stays in the middle? Sounds good to me [​IMG]
     
  18. Pantisocrat

    Pantisocrat Senior member

    Messages:
    1,772
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2010
    Location:
    États-Unis
    [​IMG]
    Your career is like marrying for love or money... Love: education, journalism, etc. Money: Law, Comp Sci, could argue business I would assume there is a dramatic inflation of these numbers now that college education is so cheap and practically attainable by all.
     
  19. arirang

    arirang Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    93
    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    I'd like to see one of these analysis compare what a tradesman makes. I know people who never went to college and learned HVAC, worked second jobs and made savvy investments and are now worth way more than any one I know who holds a bachelor's.

    +1

    The wealthiest person in my family never went to college... he scrimped for 10 years to build a small automotive repair shop. Since then he has built numerous other repair shops around town that he rents out to other guys.

    People have been putting college on a pedestal for all those years when it appears that the tide has turned. A smart person with a skilled trade could probably live quite well working for someone else, or become wealthy by starting their own business.

    If I were 16 again, I'd probably make some very different choices.
     
  20. Samovar McGee

    Samovar McGee Senior member

    Messages:
    138
    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    Location:
    New York
    Yeah, well, I went to school for Creative Writing. Graduated in 2008. Fast forward a couple years later, and now I'm working as an accountant. I'm of the opinion that it doesn't matter what degree you earned. If you can't sell it to someone, you're eating it.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by