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New pair of boots for field work

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by afaludi, Jun 12, 2008.

  1. Robert

    Robert Senior member

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    Jack Purcell leather high-top OTRs if you can find them.
     
  2. Nouveau Pauvre

    Nouveau Pauvre Senior member

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    I was looking at the LL Bean Katahdin boots and was quite impressed. Seems like they should cost way more then they are priced given all the details (Made in USA, Goodyear welted). I'll probably buy a pair soon. Does anyone else have experience with these?
     
  3. Mr. Caber

    Mr. Caber Senior member

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    ^^how did you end up sizing them?
    Regular shoe size (13). Spot on. One interesting thing - they fit fine, but visually they appear smaller than you would think - don't know why, but they don't really have that big hefty boot look.
     
  4. Nil

    Nil Senior member

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    Would it be possible to take a picture of those boots with them on? I'm looking for another pair of boots for the fall and I've never seen these in the "wild".
     
  5. chiral

    chiral Senior member

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    Would it be possible to take a picture of those boots with them on? I'm looking for another pair of boots for the fall and I've never seen these in the "wild".

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  6. chiral

    chiral Senior member

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    These have been amazing for field work, and I feel like they *still* aren't completely broken in... I can't wait for another few months of wear.
     
  7. datasupa

    datasupa Senior member

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    Those look fucking amazing. My next boot for sure.
     
  8. Nil

    Nil Senior member

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    Yeah, I'll be getting those.
     
  9. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    I work in construction as my main job and then I play in the woods in my off time. Timberland Pro boots are my first choice. Wolverine and Carhartt make very good boots too. Make no mistake, in field work spend the money on high quality boots. If you don't you'll regret it.

    I would like to see a pic of the soles of these boots if possible.
     
  10. billiebob

    billiebob Senior member

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    Field work has many many definitions. For geology you need real shitkickers that can stand up to surfing down miles and miles of scree and not rip a seam. I used 12 lb Scarpas for this with a huge welt and vibram sole and still went through a sole a season. This was the Canadian rockies and Hawaiian lava.

    For general cross country stuff I'd definitely get something lighter like the Red Wings. Break them in over at least 25 miles before you go. My Scarpas required at least 50 miles before I could wear them without heel blisters.
     
  11. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    The OP of the thread is going to be working in marshy and mainly wet conditions. I looked at the boots he bought for the job. They are a nice boot. Unfortunately they are a poor choice for the task at hand. The uppers are leather which is good but it is not waterproof leather or lined with say goretex. The second problem is the tread on the sole. It it far too smooth to be effective in mud and muck. The tread should be a self cleaning lug of some kind. It is not fun slipping off a log or a rock because of poor traction. A far better choice would have been a boot designed for upland hunting that is waterproof.

    Sorry if this hurts but it is something you really need to know.
     
  12. denimdestroyedmylife

    denimdestroyedmylife Senior member

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    ^ Good advice. Along that line of thinking, I would suggest these Russell Moccasin South40 Birdshooters. They are supremely comfortable right out of the box, lightweight and tough. If you look around, you will find these for far under retail.
     
  13. Superb0bo

    Superb0bo Senior member

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    ^^Diddy, you need to post more pics and fits. I didnt know you had Russells!
     
  14. denimdestroyedmylife

    denimdestroyedmylife Senior member

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    Sidney Lo has a pic of me in the Russells, not sure if he is willing to share.
    If you blouse your trousers, the boots give off a very strong There Will Be Blood vibe.
     
  15. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    Very nice boot and they would be an excellent choice for the OP's line of work.

    Ah the fond memories of blasting pheasants in SD....
     
  16. timw

    timw Member

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    As someone who has done extensive botany field work in bogs I'd suggest something other than leather boots. I use Converse low tops with much success.

    Leather stays wet forever and wet socks and feet increases the risk of blisters and general discomfort. Canvas sneakers (or nylon running shoes) dry quickly and greatly reduce the risk of blisters and discomfort. Ask anybody who does any long distance backpacking about what "boot" they wear. You will find that leather boots are in the very small minority; running shoes will top the list.

    Goretex and similar non-proprietary linings only trap moisture inside the boot and add to the risk of blisters. They maybe OK for short uses but for all day comfort they are a bad idea. Cotton socks fall into the same category. They trap moisture inside the boot. Not good.

    So, for field work in wet places get yourself something that will dry quickly. For scree slopes get a tough (non-waterproof) breathable leather boot.

    This comes from someone with over thirty years of long distance backpacking and wetland field work.
     
  17. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    As someone who has done extensive botany field work in bogs I'd suggest something other than leather boots. I use Converse low tops with much success.

    Leather stays wet forever and wet socks and feet increases the risk of blisters and general discomfort. Canvas sneakers (or nylon running shoes) dry quickly and greatly reduce the risk of blisters and discomfort. Ask anybody who does any long distance backpacking about what "boot" they wear. You will find that leather boots are in the very small minority; running shoes will top the list.

    Goretex and similar non-proprietary linings only trap moisture inside the boot and add to the risk of blisters. They maybe OK for short uses but for all day comfort they are a bad idea. Cotton socks fall into the same category. They trap moisture inside the boot. Not good.

    So, for field work in wet places get yourself something that will dry quickly. For scree slopes get a tough (non-waterproof) breathable leather boot.

    This comes from someone with over thirty years of long distance backpacking and wetland field work.


    Sorry, your advice is more than just poor it borders on ludicrous.

    Low top gym shoes are an extremely poor choice in any kind of woods oriented activity period. There is no ankle support, there is no significant arch support for rough terrain. You can't blouse a gym shoe so the nice friendly ticks crawl up your legs and bite. Leather is the best choice of material for protection against briars. Waterproof leather is waterproof and does not get soaked. What else? The OP lives in VA. Varied terrain from mountainous to hilly to flatland. Heavily wooded. Venomous snakes are common.

    As far as wet feet are concerned wear wool socks. Get a soaker, take off the boots, drain them and then wring out the socks. Put them back on and wow your feet feel dry for some reason. Oh that's an old hikers trick.

    My advice comes from 45 years of nearly daily activities involving the outdoors in varied climates and terrain in North America. That includes guiding and outfitting people not to mention entirely too much time fishing and hunting.
     
  18. datasupa

    datasupa Senior member

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    Note to self: disregard all future posts from timw.
     
  19. cleanup

    cleanup New Member

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    I've never posted before but I couldn't help myself here. I mean come on, give the guy a break - wearing sneakers in bogs is not crazy - working in those involves frequent wading. Slow-drying leather boots and heavy socks are silly in when you're up to your knees in muck - you want something that drains water and dries quickly. It's like wet-wading for smallmouth or trout in the summer. That said, for general off-trail use with a small to moderate gear load, Katadhins or many of the "upland" style boots would be fine - but I'd bring Chucks for the deep stuff.
     
  20. Crane's

    Crane's Senior member

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    Wet wading a river or stream is far different than muck up to your knees. A pair of gym shoes would be on your feet for about 30 seconds in muck. Been there done that. So I still recommend waterproof upland boots. An upland hunter will hunt in nearly the same environment as the OP will work. Open fields, deep woods, transitional zones and water is home to amphibians. If the OP does have to deal with real muck then a pair of muck boots should be brought along. As I said before go for a hike in deep wet woods wearing shorts and low top shoes and let me know how it works for you.
     

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