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New Contest

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Mauro, May 13, 2009.

  1. Transcendental

    Transcendental Senior member

    Messages:
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    Dec 16, 2008
    Location:
    Ann Arbor, MI
    I talked to my dad,and with with his marketing expertise (heh) he stated that obviously demographics for areas are always going to be different, but he recommended going for the woman who makes upwards of 60 to 70,000 dollars a year, but hey, thats sort of common sense =\\

    dont really know how much of a help that is
     
  2. paulesquire1

    paulesquire1 Well-Known Member

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    Feb 7, 2008
    Location:
    charlotte, nc
    Sorry to tell you but your going to continue to hear that. Most boutique's sales come from the women's side. I'm thinking more like a 70-30 split women's to men, maybe even more. In this forum, men are not scared to drop a couple hundred on a few pieces every so often to help build a wardrobe. Young women on the other hand don't want to spend much for an outfit they will wear only a couple of times, especially college girls. Has anyone looked at a typical college girls closet? A bunch of inexpensive brands tossed in a heap. They don't care about cone mills, chain-stitching, hidden rivets, made in the usa, subtle details, etc. unless they are in textile school or fashion design. They care about perceived value, fit, how cute is it, and most important, cost. Mauro, you have some great women's brands but some of our customers are a bunch of high end women's boutiques and they have/are mixing their product mix with some inexpensive brands because of the tough economic climate. Look for brands that are relatively inexpensive and can produce great margin but can compliment your other expensive women's brands. Don't go too cheap or your customer will think there is something wrong with it. The men's side is great, but you might have to lower the pricepoint on the womens' side if you want to boost sales.
     
  3. Kent Money

    Kent Money Senior member

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    Jun 11, 2007
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    mauro, I PMed you back but you have yet to respond to me. are you only loooking to discuss within this thread? let me know...


    Kent
     
  4. Crakaveli

    Crakaveli Senior member

    Messages:
    763
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    Sep 4, 2008
    Location:
    Nashville (Hendersonville)
    if I hear another woman come in and complain about our prices I'm gonna wind up on COPS

    listen to your customers. if they're not willing to pay for what you have, get different brands.
     
  5. StarterStyle

    StarterStyle Senior member

    Messages:
    338
    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2007
    How about having large pictures on the walls of real women wearing quality jeans and tops that fit well. In most stores, they have pics around of women wearing the clothes, but the only thing in focus is the chicks face.

    Put together some outfits, and get some female clients or models to wear the clothes. Put the pics up in store and online.
     
  6. phoenixrecon

    phoenixrecon Senior member

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    Mar 22, 2009
    Location:
    In some dude's court
    Mauro just don't wear a shit and stand at the entrance... it worked for Abercrombie.


    [​IMG]

    or mix it up and go for a rock star look

    [​IMG]
     
  7. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    ...but he recommended going for the woman who makes upwards of 60 to 70,000 dollars a year...

    ... I'm thinking more like a 70-30 split women's to men, maybe even more. In this forum, men are not scared to drop a couple hundred on a few pieces every so often to help build a wardrobe. Young women on the other hand don't want to spend much for an outfit they will wear only a couple of times, especially college girls. Has anyone looked at a typical college girls closet? A bunch of inexpensive brands tossed in a heap. They don't care about cone mills, chain-stitching, hidden rivets, made in the usa, subtle details, etc. unless they are in textile school or fashion design. They care about perceived value, fit, how cute is it, and most important, cost. Mauro, you have some great women's brands but some of our customers are a bunch of high end women's boutiques and they have/are mixing their product mix with some inexpensive brands because of the tough economic climate. Look for brands that are relatively inexpensive and can produce great margin but can compliment your other expensive women's brands. Don't go too cheap or your customer will think there is something wrong with it. The men's side is great, but you might have to lower the pricepoint on the womens' side if you want to boost sales.

    I've already spoken to Mauro about this, and I think he agrees, but if you know a little about women's brands, you will also know that his women's lines are considerably lower on the totem pole than his men's stuff, which appeals to the avid fashion guy. The equivalent woman is not really looking for AG jeans. That woman might be interested more in, say, Acne (already has an account?), Gary Graham, Prairie underground, Grey Ant, Margiela (perhaps a diffusion line like say, ligne 6), APC (already has an account), Alexander Wang, BOY by Band of Outsiders (already has an account), Surface to Air Paris (already has an account?), and then throw in basics from lines like Saint Grace that are not as easily available, as well as accessories like socks (my wife loves socks, and between $12 and $30, they are an easy impulse buy.)

    However, Mauro's problem right now is to move the product he has. And that is a more difficult problem, because the low and mid-end market is really dead right now. He *needs* to move the same product that very femalecentric boutiques like Intermix and Scoop NYC are having trouble moving.

    Also, branding is important. Right now, the Farinelli's brand is very masculine. The blue coat of arms screams "Dudes!" One solution might be to rebrand the women's section - call it something else, and have a store in store, like Brigitta at Blackbird, or Pas de Deux with Odin (because no woman I know is attracted to a store named after an angry Norse god.)
     
  8. skunkworks

    skunkworks Senior member

    Messages:
    751
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    Oct 16, 2007
    You should host tupperware parties, but instead of tupperware, it's like... awesome women's clothing. 15 ppl minimum, host at the store, drinks are served, party organizer gets free swag...?
     
  9. paulesquire1

    paulesquire1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Feb 7, 2008
    Location:
    charlotte, nc
    I've already spoken to Mauro about this, and I think he agrees, but if you know a little about women's brands, you will also know that his women's lines are considerably lower on the totem pole than his men's stuff, which appeals to the avid fashion guy. The equivalent woman is not really looking for AG jeans. That woman might be interested more in, say, Acne (already has an account?), Gary Graham, Prairie underground, Grey Ant, Margiela (perhaps a diffusion line like say, ligne 6), APC (already has an account), Alexander Wang, BOY by Band of Outsiders (already has an account), Surface to Air Paris (already has an account?), and then throw in basics from lines like Saint Grace that are not as easily available, as well as accessories like socks (my wife loves socks, and between $12 and $30, they are an easy impulse buy.)

    However, Mauro's problem right now is to move the product he has. And that is a more difficult problem, because the low and mid-end market is really dead right now. He *needs* to move the same product that very femalecentric boutiques like Intermix and Scoop NYC are having trouble moving.

    Also, branding is important. Right now, the Farinelli's brand is very masculine. The blue coat of arms screams "Dudes!" One solution might be to rebrand the women's section - call it something else, and have a store in store, like Brigitta at Blackbird, or Pas de Deux with Odin (because no woman I know is attracted to a store named after an angry Norse god.)



    Are you sure they aren't looking for AG, Paige, Current Elliot, Joe's, Citizen's, Ella Moss, Splendid? Those brands are the same brands that are in hundreds of boutiques across the country and are staples brands for women's boutiques. The brands you've listed are very interesting and designer but are still expensive unless you have the clientele. Imho, it still needs to be a little lower. Fine to mix those brands you listed above but also sprinkle in a bit of Free People, BB Dakota, Velvet, Michael Stars, and missing is a key jean that pretty much all women love, J Brand skinny. I guess my question is where Mauro wants to take his vision on the women's side? Designer or Generic?
     
  10. paulesquire1

    paulesquire1 Well-Known Member

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    Feb 7, 2008
    Location:
    charlotte, nc
    I do agree with the masculinity of the store and naming the women's section something else is a great idea.
     
  11. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    Are you sure they aren't looking for AG, Paige, Current Elliot, Joe's, Citizen's, Ella Moss, Splendid? Those brands are the same brands that are in hundreds of boutiques across the country and are staples brands for women's boutiques.

    And it is this mid-market that is taking the biggest hits. These are not brands sought out by fashionistas who are wiling to skimp on other things to trade up on fashion. Trying to compete in the toughest, most saturated market out there during a recession seems to be a losing proposition.

    Well, he is having problems drawing in that midmarket clientele now, so why not up it a notch, make it consistent with his men's lines, and establish himself in an underserved niche market? Could even start small. Since men are his bread and butter, he could invert the 80/20 formula, and advertise to fashionable men to bring in girlfriends, etc...

    It should match his vision for the men's side. Coherency is important.
     
  12. paulesquire1

    paulesquire1 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Location:
    charlotte, nc
    And it is this mid-market that is taking the biggest hits. These are not brands sought out by fashionistas who are wiling to skimp on other things to trade up on fashion. Trying to compete in the toughest, most saturated market out there during a recession seems to be a losing proposition.

    Well, he is having problems drawing in that midmarket clientele now, so why not up it a notch, make it consistent with his men's lines, and establish himself in an underserved niche market? Could even start small. Since men are his bread and butter, he could invert the 80/20 formula, and advertise to fashionable men to bring in girlfriends, etc...

    It should match his vision for the men's side. Coherency is important.


    No, they are not what fashionistas want. Yet customers still buy them and stores still make money on them. The booths are still busy at shows. It also depends on the distribution in the area. If Mauro can't carry them, then he'll have to look elsewhere. If he can, differentiate yourself with impeccable customer service which should be easy given his track record.

    I don't disagree, eventually it will go up a notch and he would be in with the first.

    Qft. The difference is women can easily find more fashionable items for a better price than what men can.
     
  13. Blog Marley

    Blog Marley Senior member

    Messages:
    978
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2008
    Location:
    Baghdad by the Bay
    Mauro, sorry to hear that the womens side hasn't been picking up. and at the risk of sounding like a pessimist the more I walk around DC and observe women the more I think this may be a lost cause.

    My idea (albeit expensive) is to host a party at one of the more upscale local clubs/lounges (if you could get a brand to help sponsor it would be sweet too) and possibly have a fashion show within said party (however issues of showing off other brands could be an issue) or manage to show off the goods in some way. you could of course do something similar on a smaller scale.

    It's tough to say how else you could build your women's client base. this area isn't a hot spot for women's fashion, which makes things tougher. I recall talking with a friend and noticing two different women wearing white shirts and TR and R&R jeans.

    What Teger said is pretty important, no one can deny you've provided excellent incentives. I haven't been by the store in a while but I remember the last time i was there some lady trying on a pair of nudies and saying something about the price and leaving. I guess it becomes an issue if you'd want to lower the price points for your women's section.

    The economic condition is far better here than it is in many other places, discretionary spending shouldn't be much of an issue.

    I'm not sure if you've done this as well but you may want to ask female shoppers for feedback on how to best cater to them and their shopping styles. See if it's an issue of deciding at the margin (finding something that better serves needs at a lower cost) or of utilization (paying a high price for something that wouldn't be used much).

    Hope everything works out for you.
     
  14. Crazy

    Crazy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    61
    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2008
    Hey Mauro,

    The store-in-store idea sounds genius. I think this has the most potential to work. Put a lot of girly decorations out and burn a little incense or something so they know where to go, and set out a lookbook on a table. Instead of focusing on "waywn" head on shots, shoot things in more of a glamorous advertising style, but still list brands/prices at the bottom. Make sure you have a recognizable womens logo, so the area is branded.

    If you open a store-in-store, you have an excuse to have a party, a big party. Spread the word and put out posters allover the street. Use any connections you have, and ask your male customers to invite their wives/girlfriends. Give them a reason to go, besides just the fact that you are opening a new store. Free champagne and some sort of performer (i.e. Birgitta's aerial acrobats) as well as a popular DJ and special guests. You could also have a photographer/blogger take photos of the event for publicity, and invite conventional press such as local newspapers/style columnists/fashion editors. Some sort of small discount would be a bonus to attenders. Make sure to give them some sort of gift bag in return for an email address or something. They will see the stuff you gave them when they get home and remember you as long as they have the items. Birgitta is a great model for you, and the fact they will be selling more than just womens clothing is something to take note of. Try stocking small amounts of exclusive makeup brands, hair and scented products as well as little household items.

    Try spreading the word about your store to influential, taste-making women (hairstylists, celebrity stylists, bloggers, models/fashion industry types) who will spread the word to their friends and filter down the chain. I think you need a strong female SA who will be very approachable, yet knowledgeable (If you like AG, try ____!). Not too hot as to intimidate new women just checking out your store, but well dressed and memorable. You might need to go through a lot of resumes to hire a woman who fits the bill, but put the word out. You could also talk to a Barneys SA or someone and offer them the job with a slight increase in pay.

    It's not just going to be one idea that sets your womans business on fire, so try a few different things. Some sort of discount is probably also in order. Try a special new female customers discount (something like your old denimbar 30%) and make sure to get their email addresses and put out a special ladies only newsletter with columns/tips in addition to clothing info for customer retention.
     

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