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Netbooks?

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by farfisa23, Dec 10, 2008.

  1. Matt

    Matt Senior member

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    Quick Linux question: Do they make a iPod software for Linux? I just want something easy - cloud computing and a place to charge my iPod.

    Basically yes, there are some apps, but certainly nothing that keeps it as well organised as iTunes does. See this article for more information.

    Note - iPhone and iPod touch - not a lot. Some people were developing a system that would keep it organised wirelessly. Not sure how that is progressing.

    Yeah, it isnt too hard. I am a long term Mac guy, use a Macbook Pro at home, but switched my PC based office to Ubuntu Linux a year ago. The learning curve wasnt that steep, although there was no shortage of grumbling from my staff. You will have to go into the terminal more often even in the easiest of distros than you will in the Mac, but after some playing, it gets less daunting.
     
  2. Flambeur

    Flambeur Senior member

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    Hmmm well i'd definitely pick windows since I run/have so much windows software.

    But other than that I think 10" screen + long battery life would be key.
     
  3. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    Also, is it pretty easy to use a Linux OS if I am a Mac guy? I know OSX has a Linux Kernel and all.
    OS X is based on Mach and BSD, which is UNIX-like, like Linux. I would say that the Mac GUI (Graphical User Interface) is built from the assumption that you're going to be using the GUI most of the time, while Linux GUIs are kind of strap-on affairs that will still make you use the command line to do certain things. It will not be as easy to use as OS X for many tasks, especially if you don't want to know what's going on under the hood. The level of refinement of the GUI in OS X is far, far beyond anything Linux has to offer. For that matter, the Windows GUI is leagues ahead of Linux as well. See if you can play with one before you get it --- that's probably the best way to tell if it's right for you. --Andre
     
  4. Berticus

    Berticus Senior member

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    Use of Linux varies depending on distro and their choices (or lack of) of software. I've always hated Ubuntu, since it's first release. Like any operating system, it's gonna take time to get used to. If you really wanted, you could turn Linux into a Mac clone since the GUI isn't tied down to the rest of the system. There's a lot of different window managers and desktop environments available and all of them are highly themable. I mean look at the evolution of my desktop throughout my linux career if you go to my deviantart page. Note that they're not in order.
    The level of refinement of the GUI in OS X is far, far beyond anything Linux has to offer. For that matter, the Windows GUI is leagues ahead of Linux as well.
    Depends on what you're looking for.
     
  5. Night Owl

    Night Owl Senior member

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    I bought two Eeepc Surf's to give to my nephew and niece this Christmas. I may end up buying one for myself, maybe the 1000 series. I like the idea of the netbook.
     
  6. skalogre

    skalogre Senior member

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    Acer Aspire One... If you compare it with the others, none of them come close in terms of cost and specs.

    I have one and I love it.


    Same here. Even loaded the Windows version of the last.fm client (using WINE) to stream my music while usinbg the machine.
     
  7. ratboycom

    ratboycom Senior member

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    I have a MSI Wind 6cell. For my day to day use its great and quick enough (with 2gb of ram). I mean I am not using it for Video encoding or Photoshop/Premier like my old desktop, but I am using it for what it was intended for (Net, watching videos on the run, office stuff, etc). There are some minor annoyances, like the fan issue and the fact that they put a shitty sentylics touch pad in here instead of the nice synaptics (like the one that the EEE 1000 uses), it can be swaped out for about $25 to the good one, but its a pain in the ass to do.

    I wouldnt get the Lenovo as I heard that mofo gets HOT. You may want to hold back just a month or so as the new wave of models will be coming out soon. Basically they will be the same but with more efficient Atom processors.

    PS I get around 5-6 hours battery life running in eco mode.
     
  8. Matt

    Matt Senior member

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    I've always hated Ubuntu, since it's first release.

    why?

    what distro are you using?
     
  9. A Y

    A Y Senior member

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    Another good reason to wait on Atom-based netbooks is that Nvidia is about to integrate the MCP79 chipset (which has the GeForce 9400M graphics processor that's found in the newest Macbooks) with Atom, greatly increasing their graphics performance.

    --Andre
     
  10. jase12

    jase12 Senior member

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    I have the HP mini-note. It travels very well and has a very usable keyboard. That would be a problem for me with many of the netbooks. Screen looks great as well. If you only need linux, that model is pretty cheap.

    +1

    keyboard is i think 92% of full size? makes it so much easier to type than trying to use my sausage finger on some of the other netbooks. netbooks are amazing, i love them
     
  11. Berticus

    Berticus Senior member

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    why? what distro are you using?
    I honestly don't remember. Whenever there's a new release, I think, "I should check it out since I don't remember why I disliked it so much." Then when I try it, I remember. I do give it an honest try, and am quite lenient with it. I'll probably remember in 2 weeks when I have to install it for someone. He wants me to setup a server and we were going to do it a couple of days ago, but the hard drive died. I'm one of those guys who found out what I liked by distro hopping and reading about the backend of Linux. So I pick one of the Big 5 (Debian, Gentoo, Slackware, Archlinux, LFS) where you're just given the minimum --- the Linux kernel, GNU and a toolchain. From there I build up what I need. I really like my setup a lot. 6 different teletypes and 2 X sessions running. The reason I have two is because most people can't use my desktop. I have a mouseless tiling window manager, which aims to increase productivity and maximizes screen use. The second one follows WIMP computing. So for someone like me, the GUI offered by Mac OS X and Windows is considered outdated, which is why I said:
    Originally Posted by A Y
    The level of refinement of the GUI in OS X is far, far beyond anything Linux has to offer. For that matter, the Windows GUI is leagues ahead of Linux as well.
    Depends on what you're looking for.
    The only reason I'm in the terminal is because I find it very redundant to have a file manager. I have a very strict filesystem hierarchy and naming convention. Having a file system to graphically view files/folders and perform tasks such as copying, renaming and moving is just weird when GNU does that excellently with rm, cp and mv. Navigation is also much faster outside of the graphical interface when you learn about popd, pushd and relative paths using ~ and ~-. If you get someone who knows Linux very well to setup your system for you, you shouldn't have to touch the Terminal. That's what I did for my roommate. He bugged me a year to setup Linux on his laptop. I finally got around to it. He doesn't even know what a terminal is, and he wants Linux on every computer he sees. My ex-roommate also decided to take the plunge on his Macbook Pro when he saw both of us with Linux. Except he wanted to be a terminal jockey, like me. Since he didn't know quite as much, he split his time between a virtual terminal and the graphical interface. My brother also wanted to be a terminal jockey. Unlike my ex-roommate though, he completely ditched X11 and was working in the teletype every time. Linux's robustness really shines in the Big 5 when you get to tailor it to your specific needs. It's like the bespoke suit of operating systems. ---Edit--- Oh sorry, didn't actually answer your question. My distro of choice is Arch Linux.
     
  12. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I have been really enjoying my EeePC 1000H after grabbing it on ebay with live.com cashback in august. A friend of mine was inspired and recently got the 1000HA (same thing but with more HD space).

    I've got 2GB ram and right now it is set to dual boot xandros and ubuntu. I will probably ditch the stock xandros now that ubuntu (with adamm's kernel and some other guys ACPI scripts) is just as functional.

    the system came with XP but as far as the Windows tax goes, I didnt feel it. The 1000H is actually cheaper by a fair amount than the 1000 since SSD drives cost so much more.

    I've seen the wind and I am happy I went with the 1000H...better battery and a multitouch mouse makes it so much more enjoyable.
     
  13. Flambeur

    Flambeur Senior member

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    I stopped by best buy last night, they had a mini 10, ee 10, and the smaller ee.. I actually really like the 10" models, they seem just right for an ultralight.
     
  14. montyharding

    montyharding Senior member

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    I don't know what the appeal is about the 12" G4 - it weighs more than almost any 13" notebook (bar the recently superceded macbook, one of the heaviest non-basic 13"s you could buy) you'd care to name, to a very noticeable level.

    In the lightweight netbookesque category I have the Air and the Sony TT. The TT is vastly superior to the Air as a portable companion if you have the eyesight to cope with the increased pixel density of the screen.

    Most recently I used a couple of different netbooks but I wouldn't actually use any of these on a daily basis, even though a lot of my work is web-bound... because there's a fair amount I also do on the machine itself, and the low-endiness of these machines is just offputting if you're used to better things.
     
  15. bkk

    bkk Senior member

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    I looked at a handful of netbooks. All of the 9" and smaller models were too small for my liking. The keyboard was much too small and I was aggravated by constantly missing the shift key. I also took HP out of the running because my wife's work laptop is an HP, and its the worst laptop either one of us has ever owned. Among its other issues, it overheats when placed on a flat/cool surface. Terrible engineering. That left me with Lenovo, MSI, and Asus, and I went with the Asus 1000HA just because I was able to use my AMEX points to get it for free (and I've had good luck with Asus's motherboards in my PCs).

    That being said, the 1000HA isn't perfect. The on board mouse is useless. The track pad works as expected, but the buttons don't have a good feel and take too much force to press. The shift keys also require a bit of conditioning to be able to hit them without looking. I've had some issues with hitting the up arrow instead, which has been annoying. Other than that, I'm quite happy so far. Its great for what I need: something to drag around the house with me when I need to do simple things like surf the net or listen to music over the network. All of the power computing is done through my PC.

    End my 2 cents.
     
  16. Flambeur

    Flambeur Senior member

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    Most recently I used a couple of different netbooks but I wouldn't actually use any of these on a daily basis, even though a lot of my work is web-bound... because there's a fair amount I also do on the machine itself, and the low-endiness of these machines is just offputting if you're used to better things.

    since you have some experience with this, can you explain what exactly makes netbooks unsuitable for daily use if you mostly use internet/office software?
     
  17. montyharding

    montyharding Senior member

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    since you have some experience with this, can you explain what exactly makes netbooks unsuitable for daily use if you mostly use internet/office software?
    For one, you're walking around with a badge saying "I'm a broke student / hausfrau who bought on price who knows nothing about computers". Apart from the other problems of relative build quality, functional limitations, slowness, etc (not to mention needing to reload the OS if you want full connectivity since not many ship with XP Pro) the first reason alone is enough to put me off.
     
  18. breakz

    breakz Senior member

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    For one, you're walking around with a badge saying "I'm a broke student / hausfrau who bought on price who knows nothing about computers".
    I thought I was the only one concerned about the impressions my computing solutions make on others.
     
  19. montyharding

    montyharding Senior member

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    When you sit in front of a large number of posers wielding Apples on a regular basis, it's a starting factor [​IMG]
     

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