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Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Douglas, Aug 2, 2012.

  1. f800gs

    f800gs Senior member

    Messages:
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    Feb 7, 2012
    Yep, for me the hardest part of a bike ride or run is the 40 foot of driveway.

    Once I get going it is all good. YMMV.
     
  2. Sir Humphrey Appleby

    Sir Humphrey Appleby Senior member

    Messages:
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    May 28, 2011
    I have a question.....

    Got this friend who I want a relationship with, or at least a one off shag, she seems to want it too but she's led me on once and blown me off (the bad kind) twice, I think its partly her traditional Asian family and partly the long distance (now two hours by car, in a month it will be 15 hours including an 8 hour plane journey). She's busy with her MSc dissertation but won't even acknowledge me or the messages I send her on Facebook and seems to be hanging around with some English geek and bigging him up on Facebook (she never does anything public on there until she became FB friends with him), even though I've offered to help her with her MSc in a big way, she also knows of some of the sacrifices I have made for her in the past.

    A couple of months ago I asked her out again (three years after the first time) and she said no for the second time, two days later I met her and she was wearing a low cut top etc compared to her normal conservative dress and asked me to visit her in China next year (I sometimes wonder if this offer will still be on the cards or if she'll ever make an effort to contact me when she's at home), she's asked me to take her to football matches etc so I generally think she's still into me/wants to be my friend BUT the fairly regular ignoring me is starting to seriously wind me up, which impresses me as normally I don't get wound up.

    She's the best girl in the world and really brings out the best in me but now I'm wondering if any relationship is still possible or worthwhile, I'll fight tooth and nail for it so my question is, how do I get her back to talking to me or finding out if we are friends or not, ignore her until she comes to me or say I'm seriously questioning her as a friend and force her to lay her cards on the table?
     
  3. Sir Humphrey Appleby

    Sir Humphrey Appleby Senior member

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    ^ Or do I tell her the secret I was going to tell her until she was a no show after I drove two hours to see her? She won't tell anyone else and even if she does the splatter will be contained, as it will if I do have to end things with her.
     
  4. HansderHund

    HansderHund Senior member

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    Location:
    Austria
    I'll ask the Panel...

    My father-in-law and I get along, but he has a tendency of making our lives a bit harder than necessary. He still has the mindset that his daughter is under his authority and doesn't like when we make a decision that would be against his wishes. It can be as benign as choosing our own apartment. We'll hear something like "that's too expensive, that's not the best area, etc..."

    Anyway, we bought my wife a car last fall. It was used, only going to be a to work and drive the dog around type of car. We bought it, he was pissed. He said that we didn't need it and that he wouldn't fix it. Fast forward a couple of months and he says that if we need something fixed, he'll take a look. I don't own the correct tools nor do I have the know-how.

    We failed our inspection and found out that we need quite a bit of work done to it. We've avoided telling him as that will result in an "I told you so.." situation. If we refrain from telling him, he'll still be upset. We don't know whether to pour a bunch of money into a used car or put that money towards a newer car.

    So, finally, do I go to him for advice and reap the consequences or do I take the reigns and make a decision without his (usually wise and conservative) advice?
     
  5. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    greater chicago
    

    good you caught ourself now, congrats, my fucking c*** of a sister is 50 and hasn't figured this out.


    here's what I would do -

    1. get a sales job, literally anything that has you selling to people.
    2. go to a community college and get a certificate in some type of medical tech job - respiratory tech is the best, but there are probably 50 similar types of certifications
    3. try to leverage the two into a job selling medical equipment
    4. get an on line MBA, eventually.

    a good sales rep in the healthcare field can make pretty good money and live pretty well.
     
  6. Sir Humphrey Appleby

    Sir Humphrey Appleby Senior member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    May 28, 2011
    Me, a colleague and fairly senior manager (who has now left) have been trying to work out how to get a particular spreadsheet to work for 3 or 4 weeks and I finally cracked it tonight. The processes it monitors are going to be broken up in a couple of weeks ready for the Christmas rush so it won't work in its current form, the changes are very simple but you need to know how to do the bit we were stuck on to be able to do it.

    Do I:

    A) Password protect the spreadsheet, hide the intermediate worksheets and email it to my colleague to taunt him or
    B) Tell him I've done it and how to do it but only in the presence of a manager so I definitely get the credit?
     
  7. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    In My Douchemobile
    

    Both.
     
  8. ter1413

    ter1413 Senior member

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    Dec 3, 2009
    Location:
    Central Booking
    Re-decorating my living room.....do I hang up on da walls:

    A) Original paintings(that I had framed here in NY) from street vendors in Madrid/Bangkok/Montreal/Cairo....
    B) Prints(that I have had framed)-2 Basquait and 1 Keith Haring
    ??

    Riddle me that panel!
     
  9. acidboy

    acidboy Senior member

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    Mar 13, 2006
    ^ hard to judge if we haven't seen the paintings.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2012
  10. Bhowie

    Bhowie Senior member

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    13,099
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    Location:
    Running the trap house.
    I might have a question to pose, but would rather PM the panel. When I siber up I hope to remember.
     
  11. YOLO EMSHI

    YOLO EMSHI Senior member

    Messages:
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    Sep 1, 2012
    Location:
    Sadney
    So I'm in my third year of university and I am simply not feeling it anymore. I started off as a government major for my first year and semester, at which point I realised this was not for me, so for the last year and semester I have since been an art history/philosophy double major. Last semester was great, a lot of fun learning, supportive tutors and lecturers and fantastic grades, but this semester has been the complete opposite. My courses either have uninspiring lecturers or uninspiring content. I'm not sure if this is just a short phase or an actual realisation but I feel like I'm not getting anywhere with what's being offered at my current university. The humanities department is the best in the country but the art history department seems to be completely isolated from the kind of work i want to get into: art writing outside of academics.

    So I want to transfer to a different university, a smaller art school with a better program and better integrated in the industry I'd like to get work in. The question now is should I transfer, and if so when?

    If I don't transfer, then I basically have another year and semester to complete my BA. At this stage I can either do two things, do my honours then proceed into post-grad and compromise and go into academics, or after that do another Bachelor's in art theory (at the smaller art school) and do my honours there instead (four years in total). Although the latter option requires a lot more years I come out with a more rounded education and it leaves my options open.

    If i do transfer for the coming semester then it will basically be another 2-3 years at a new school, then honours, then perhaps post-grad.

    You might say the transfer option and the second bachelor's option is the same but they aren't, I wouldn't be able to study any philosophy (outside its relevance to art) if I transfer.

    Money is no issue because I don't have to pay for any upfront fees until I start working and earning 50K+ p.a. and even then I'd still have a liveable income. The only issue for me is the amount of years lost.

    I know this must be agonising to read for the older SFers, so I just want to clarify that my intentions are not just to waste as many years at school to avoid being an adult, I am genuinely interested in learning the most I can while studying and finding some level of success as a writer.

    Also I apologize for the massive post.
     
  12. FLMountainMan

    FLMountainMan Senior member

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    McAnally Flats
    

    I would not transfer. You don't go to college to maximize your learning, there is a great deal of truth behind the cliche that a library card will teach you more than most professors.

    If your current school has "the best humanities department in the country", you should stay there and get that degree. Do your honors/second bachelor's at the second school that you feel is a better fit (but realize that the instruction will likely be just as shitty as your current school). Will that second bachelor's really take four years? Will none of the credits transfer? I find that really hard to believe.

    Your concern about "years lost" will seem silly when you're in your thirties.
     
  13. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    omicron persei 8
    

    Walking on eggshells is a good book. It's less about helping your family member than it is helping you deal with them.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2012
  14. Thomas

    Thomas Senior member

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    Jul 25, 2006
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    Texas
    

    MHO - don't transfer, get your degree and start living outside of academia. Return only if you see a need to and can justify in financially.
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. indesertum

    indesertum Senior member

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    This is good stuff
     
    1 person likes this.
  16. Pilot

    Pilot Senior member

    Messages:
    2,663
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    Jan 13, 2008
    Alright, time for another quarter life crisis post.

    I currently work for a lower level flying company that does specific, technical work. (not passengers or cargo) I make more money than my other friends and peers, but I'm in a job with fewer long term opportunities and it provides literally no challenge or very relevant experience to higher up jobs. This job is insanely cushy (i work 2 weeks out of the month and of those two weeks it's generally 6-8 days of actual flying) and I went into it knowing that it would be short term, no more than two year or so, probably less. Now that I've seen what the aviation world has to offer I've decided that flying is a little different than I thought it would be. I knew the schedules would be hard, very long days, constantly changing, etc, but I just didn't estimate the tedium of actually flying day in and day out. I've learned how to deal with all of this at my current job and feel that I could put up with this for the rest of my career though. I would just be resigning myself to knowing that every day I would work I would be bored and not challenged about 95% of the time. (Not looking for a "i sit behind a desk for 10hrs a day and I'm stuck in an office. Suck it up" response) I realize most people are bored with and dislike their jobs. I've decided that if I were to stay with aviation it would be strictly for the lifestyle I could have with the job. Free travel, the ability to work less if I needed to, and pretty good pay later on in the career. I'm still young and single so I would use my free time to travel places and experience life for the time being. The other draw back is once I do settle down ,have kids, etc.. I will probably be gone 12-15 days a month, but that just comes with the territory.

    On the flip side. I've always been a person who likes hardship and tests. Always enjoyed physical exertion in high school sports, being pushed to physical limits, and being part of something special and demanding. (Mainly because I excel in these areas) I've thought about taking on a job that would constantly be that in some form or fashion. Have a long military history in my family from just about every branch. I'm considering joining the Marines as an officer. I wouldn't care whether I got a flight slot or not, although being a marine pilot would almost guarantee me a solid paying airline gig when i got out. I would like to have some type of job that would give me skills to transfer to a civilian job when i retired. (I'd be around 45 once i finished up the full 20yrs) I don't have some calling to serve my country per se and am not the most nationalistic person there is. This would be more of a personal thing. It seems I would get the travel and life experiences (obviously different experiences than I would with an airline job and travel) I long for. Have the prestige of being a marine on my resume yada yada. Every 4-6 months I get this urge that I want to join the military. This has been happening since my freshman year in college.

    I feel like I've explored all options and really given this a lot of thought. The few friends and coworkers I've spoken with this about have pushed my towards the Marines with them telling me that I'm pretty much made for it and could definitely see me doing it.

    Also, if for some reason I totally dislike the military or it just doesn't work out I still have enough experience to keep my flying career moving along. I could also return to it after my military career ended.

    Any input is helpful and I could speak more in depth over a PM if someone needed specifics.
     
  17. Douglas

    Douglas Senior member

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    Nobody can really answer this question for you, but I'd have the following three points of advice for you:

    1 - Remember that any military job can ultimately ask you to make the ultimate sacrifice. Do not underestimate this reality if you are not prepared at some level to confront it. I understand that maybe it's different for pilots or for officers than for enlisted, but it's not just privates dying over there.

    2 - It sounds to me as though you have plenty of time outside of work in your current vocation to pursue the self-actualizing activities that will allow you to grow as a person. Piob will undoubtedly "like" this post when he reads this next bit: It is a fallacy that has been pushed on your generation that you should love your job and work in a field and/or capacity that rewards you in ways other than finances. While it's true that some people do love their jobs, it's not true that everyone, or even a majority of them, do. Do not underestimate the freedom that your current job offers, financially and most of all time-wise, to follow your bliss.

    3 - The grass is always greener on the other side. There's going to be plenty of drudgery, sometimes mind-numbing drudgery, in a military officer's job. And if you're flying in the military, is there a reason it would be different than the current flying drudgery you have today?

    Good luck.
     
  18. Pilot

    Pilot Senior member

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    Thanks for the response. I've definitely come to terms with a job is nothing more than a device to make money. In that regard, staying in aviation and starting a job that could lead to 150-250k a year would make the most sense financially. I am very fortunate to have as much free time as I do now and that's something that would probably be at a premium in the military.
     
  19. KenjiKen

    KenjiKen Active Member

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    Aug 30, 2012
    How do I keep myself from drinking?
    I need to stop. What do I try?
     
  20. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    

    Did your mother raise a quitter? I hope not.
     
    5 people like this.

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