Need a minor for architecture major

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by ryanlvv, May 30, 2011.

  1. venessian

    venessian Senior member

    Messages:
    1,248
    Likes Received:
    42
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2011
    Location:
    Sò più de eà che de qua.
    I would generally agree with RSS, but I think it does depend also on what your long-term goals in architecture are (and to some extent to which graduate school(s) you will be applying). If you want to go into design, then definitely art/art history/architectural history. If you intend to pursue other facets of architecture, other avenues might serve you better.

    I see that the program you will attend provides a non-accredited B.S.Arch. degree; given that, you should certainly be able to design your own minor, as you stated above, rather than follow a pre-determined minor, in order to flush out your undergraduate degree as fully as possible.
     


  2. Tangfastic

    Tangfastic Senior member

    Messages:
    1,358
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2007
    Location:
    Bristol
    I studied archaeology and a lot of architects took modules with us on the historical buildings side; things like vernacular architecture, castles and great houses, ecclesiastical architecture. You'll need to know about the Greek and Roman stuff for when you're sticking pilasters on the front of some suburban shoebox.

    Find out which faculty (archeology, classics, anthropology, art history) offers these subjects.
     


  3. RSS

    RSS Senior member

    Messages:
    10,042
    Likes Received:
    290
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Location:
    No.1 Nonsuch Place
    I would generally agree with RSS, but I think it does depend also on what your long-term goals in architecture are (and to some extent to which graduate school(s) you will be applying). If you want to go into design, then definitely art/art history/architectural history. If you intend to pursue other facets of architecture, other avenues might serve you better.
    You make a good point. I tend to assume design rather other avenues such as the business side or urban planning (via grad school).


    I studied archaeology and a lot of architects took modules with us on the historical buildings side; things like vernacular architecture, castles and great houses, ecclesiastical architecture. You'll need to know about the Greek and Roman stuff for when you're sticking pilasters on the front of some suburban shoebox.

    Find out which faculty (archeology, classics, anthropology, art history) offers these subjects.

    I certainly aprove of your last comment. But, Tangfastic, please note that some of us actually work on historical restorations of buildings and a knowledge of the classical orders (be it those set to paper by Vitrivus or Vignola) is critical. Not everyone is "sticking pilasters" on some McMansion. Of course, if the place is a swankienda by John Staub, I might approve.
     


  4. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

    Messages:
    4,553
    Likes Received:
    16
    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    You make a good point. I tend to assume design rather other avenues such as the business side or urban planning (via grad school). I certainly aprove of your last comment. But, Tangfastic, please note that some of us actually work on historical restorations of buildings and a knowledge of the classical orders (be it those set to paper by Vitrivus or Vignola) is critical. Not everyone is "sticking pilasters" on some McMansion. Of course, if the place is a swankienda by John Staub, I might approve.
    Do most/some/or not many architects do their own structural engineering? Correct me if I'm wrong please but is SE part of architecture majors?
     


  5. RSS

    RSS Senior member

    Messages:
    10,042
    Likes Received:
    290
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Location:
    No.1 Nonsuch Place
    Do most/some/or not many architects do their own structural engineering? Correct me if I'm wrong please but is SE part of architecture majors?
    My program required 16 hours of Structural Engineering course work. That said, most architects I know work with a fully licensed professional or structural engineer. I know of very few who received degrees in both architecture and structural engineering.

    That said, I have often engineered smaller residential projects, but wouldn't consider taking on that role with a larger project.
     


  6. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

    Messages:
    4,553
    Likes Received:
    16
    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    My program required 16 hours of Structural Engineering course work. That said, most architect's I know work with a fully licensed professional or structural engineer. I know of very few who received degrees in both architecture and structural engineering. That said, I have often engineered smaller projects, but wouldn't consider taking on that role with a larger project.
    Thank you [​IMG] Do you think that having an SE degree would affect how an architect approached things aesthetically ? Or wouldn't it make much difference?
     


  7. RSS

    RSS Senior member

    Messages:
    10,042
    Likes Received:
    290
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Location:
    No.1 Nonsuch Place
    ^sorry about my using the possive when I meant plural.
     


  8. RSS

    RSS Senior member

    Messages:
    10,042
    Likes Received:
    290
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Location:
    No.1 Nonsuch Place
    Do you think that having an SE degree would affect how an architect approached things aesthetically ? Or wouldn't it make much difference?
    Two people in my relatively small class pursued degrees in structural engineering in addition to architecture. Their work always stressed the structural by fully exposing it.
     


  9. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

    Messages:
    4,553
    Likes Received:
    16
    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    ^sorry about my using the possive when I meant plural.
    No worries ('s) [​IMG]
     


  10. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

    Messages:
    4,553
    Likes Received:
    16
    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    Two people in my relatively small class persued degrees in structural engineering in addition to architecture. Their work always stressed the structural by fully exposing it.
    Aah. Seems to make sense. The structural is the aesthetic. Similar to the timber framers that I've met. Speaking to them is about the only time you can use the word "undersquint" in casual conversation (without getting slapped).
     


  11. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    33,479
    Likes Received:
    8,847
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    Just wanted to say from somebody that has no knowledge of the education behind architects this has been interesting to read thus far.
     


  12. RSS

    RSS Senior member

    Messages:
    10,042
    Likes Received:
    290
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Location:
    No.1 Nonsuch Place
    No worries ('s) [​IMG]
    ... and now comes persued for pursued. [​IMG]
     


  13. RSS

    RSS Senior member

    Messages:
    10,042
    Likes Received:
    290
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2008
    Location:
    No.1 Nonsuch Place
    Aah. Seems to make sense. The structural is the aesthetic. Similar to the timber framers that I've met.

    Speaking to them is about the only time you can use the word "undersquint" in casual conversation (without getting slapped).

    Your use is only the second time I've seen that work in print. I don't think I've ever heard it used ... and I recently completed a 24 car "carriage house" that is timber framed.
     


  14. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

    Messages:
    4,553
    Likes Received:
    16
    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    ... and now comes persued for pursued. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     


  15. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

    Messages:
    4,553
    Likes Received:
    16
    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    Your use is only the second time I've seen that work in print. I don't think I've ever heard it used ... and I recently completed a 24 car "carriage house" that is timber framed.
    Ah, tears for expertise lost. Actually used joins with double undersquints where I was worried the join would be put under tension as the beam sagged under load. Better than pins (IMHO) and it made for an interesting carpentry exercise. (so that makes 3 times) [​IMG]
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by