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Need a minor for architecture major

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by ryanlvv, May 30, 2011.

  1. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

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    My program required 16 hours of Structural Engineering course work. That said, most architect's I know work with a fully licensed professional or structural engineer. I know of very few who received degrees in both architecture and structural engineering. That said, I have often engineered smaller projects, but wouldn't consider taking on that role with a larger project.
    Thank you [​IMG] Do you think that having an SE degree would affect how an architect approached things aesthetically ? Or wouldn't it make much difference?
     
  2. RSS

    RSS Senior member

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    ^sorry about my using the possive when I meant plural.
     
  3. RSS

    RSS Senior member

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    Do you think that having an SE degree would affect how an architect approached things aesthetically ? Or wouldn't it make much difference?
    Two people in my relatively small class pursued degrees in structural engineering in addition to architecture. Their work always stressed the structural by fully exposing it.
     
  4. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

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    ^sorry about my using the possive when I meant plural.
    No worries ('s) [​IMG]
     
  5. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

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    Two people in my relatively small class persued degrees in structural engineering in addition to architecture. Their work always stressed the structural by fully exposing it.
    Aah. Seems to make sense. The structural is the aesthetic. Similar to the timber framers that I've met. Speaking to them is about the only time you can use the word "undersquint" in casual conversation (without getting slapped).
     
  6. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Just wanted to say from somebody that has no knowledge of the education behind architects this has been interesting to read thus far.
     
  7. RSS

    RSS Senior member

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    No worries ('s) [​IMG]
    ... and now comes persued for pursued. [​IMG]
     
  8. RSS

    RSS Senior member

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    Aah. Seems to make sense. The structural is the aesthetic. Similar to the timber framers that I've met.

    Speaking to them is about the only time you can use the word "undersquint" in casual conversation (without getting slapped).

    Your use is only the second time I've seen that work in print. I don't think I've ever heard it used ... and I recently completed a 24 car "carriage house" that is timber framed.
     
  9. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

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    ... and now comes persued for pursued. [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

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    Your use is only the second time I've seen that work in print. I don't think I've ever heard it used ... and I recently completed a 24 car "carriage house" that is timber framed.
    Ah, tears for expertise lost. Actually used joins with double undersquints where I was worried the join would be put under tension as the beam sagged under load. Better than pins (IMHO) and it made for an interesting carpentry exercise. (so that makes 3 times) [​IMG]
     
  11. kungapa

    kungapa Senior member

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    I would imagine it has nothing to do with computer programming but more about using specific computer programs (modelling/CAD most likely I would assume).

    I can't imagine may situations in which an architect would be writing out something in C++. Maybe using scripting languages built into other tools to perform specific tasks (so a little very basic CS could be helpful) but nothing along the lines of "real" programming.

    For a minor, this is the only advice you need:
    Take whatever the fuck you want. Find something you enjoy or that interests you. Find something that will be hard to pick up after you graduate (a spanish minor will get you far more than trying to take some crappy once a week class for an hour after work at the language acquisition center).
    This whole thing is about making you a better person not preparing you for a specific career. Since you are pursueing a professional program, that part becomes more about a career so why not use your minor to do something fun/different (or just take classes you find interesting and say screw the minor since exactly zero people will care about your minor after you graduate).


    You'd be surprised - but it is usually rather niche work.

    Also, if it is design you want to get into, be sure to master the digital modelling tools - especially Rhino at the moment, preferably with a solid understanding of Grasshopper.
     
  12. bingebag

    bingebag Well-Known Member

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    Also, if it is design you want to get into, be sure to master the digital modelling tools - especially Rhino at the moment, preferably with a solid understanding of Grasshopper.

    Not pushing Revit/Tekla on the kids yet?
     
  13. summej2

    summej2 Senior member

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    FWIW, it seems to me that new building systems and other nonvisual aspects of design (e.g., acoustics and climate) are going to be the areas where architecture really grows over the next few decades. Energy demands combined with the aging population are going to create new needs.
     

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