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Need a minor for architecture major

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by ryanlvv, May 30, 2011.

  1. ryanlvv

    ryanlvv Well-Known Member

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    I'm transferring to a college and won't be able to fully enter the program until next year, I'll be able to take all my pre-reqs for it but usually they have freshman take their gen eds but I will be done since I'm transferring. Anyways, during this time I've been advised to work/almost complete my minor...now what should it be..

    http://admission.wsu.edu/academics/f...castle?id=7774
    I should probably minor in one of these to help me out the most.
    My best guess would be construction management?

    Apparel Design
    Art
    Art History
    Construction Management
    East Asian Studies for Engineering and Architecture Majors
    Fine Arts
    Global Studies
    Merchandising
     
  2. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Doesn't matter at all. Pick the one you're enthusiastic about. Global studies and fine arts (with an emphasis on freehand drawing/mixed media) are the only two that really stand out as being unique opportunities to give you relevant knowledge/skills that you might otherwise miss in a formal architecture education.
     
  3. Stewbone

    Stewbone Senior member

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    My dad has been an architect for 30 years now and the advice he is always giving me (im in the field of economics) is how important computer programming is to know. My dad is always saying how quick technology is changing in the field of architecture and if you have skills in computer information systems it helps you adapt easier.
     
  4. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos Senior member

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    My dad has been an architect for 30 years now and the advice he is always giving me (im in the field of economics) is how important computer programming is to know. My dad is always saying how quick technology is changing in the field of architecture and if you have skills in computer information systems it helps you adapt easier.
    +100 If you're in college right now and not soaking up as much computer science as you can, you are fucking your future up the ass. Seriously. I don't care what field you want to go into; CS is the future of your field. And college is the best time to learn it (actually, high school is, but I digress). Everyone thinks they can just "pick up" CS on the job, or after graduation in their spare time. What they quickly learn is that a) spare time is laughably nonexistent in the working world, and b) CS is a subject that doesn't come naturally to most people, and thus, requires a lot of time invested.
     
  5. Fuuma

    Fuuma Senior member

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    +100

    If you're in college right now and not soaking up as much computer science as you can, you are fucking your future up the ass. Seriously. I don't care what field you want to go into; CS is the future of your field.


    Isn't the CS future of your field located somewhere in India right now?
     
  6. Don Carlos

    Don Carlos Senior member

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    Isn't the CS future of your field located somewhere in India right now?
    Lawl, yes. I'll be comfortably retired (or sufficiently nest-egged-up) by the time the big reckoning hits my industry, though.
     
  7. imschatz

    imschatz Senior member

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    My dad has been an architect for 30 years now and the advice he is always giving me (im in the field of economics) is how important computer programming is to know. My dad is always saying how quick technology is changing in the field of architecture and if you have skills in computer information systems it helps you adapt easier.
    +1 .. when you know basic programming skills, you are way out in front. The ability to replace repetitive tasks with "macros" or simple computer programs .. makes you much more productive, and gets you comfortable using computers in a more sophisticated way.
     
  8. ryanlvv

    ryanlvv Well-Known Member

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    Ahh, I remember a quarter where I took CS101, CS105, and CS110.

    I almost lost my financial aid because of that quarter.

    I figure i'll do a mix of fine arts and computer science though even if I don't get a minor in anything as long as I actually learn something that is useful to me.

    Thanks for the advice everyone.
     
  9. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    My dad has been an architect for 30 years now and the advice he is always giving me (im in the field of economics) is how important computer programming is to know. My dad is always saying how quick technology is changing in the field of architecture and if you have skills in computer information systems it helps you adapt easier.
    Are you sure he's talking about how important computer programming knowledge is or how important computer program knowledge is? I know few if any architects that are skilled in actual computer programming.
     
  10. ryanlvv

    ryanlvv Well-Known Member

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    Indiana
    Would a business admin minor be helpful, I was going to major in it before I transferred to a school with an ARCH degree, so it wouldn't be too much of a stretch to get my minor in that.
     
  11. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Probably not. You'll have a course or two on professional practice and the different business structures of offices and their finances. Just do what you want to learn.
     
  12. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I would imagine it has nothing to do with computer programming but more about using specific computer programs (modelling/CAD most likely I would assume).

    I can't imagine may situations in which an architect would be writing out something in C++. Maybe using scripting languages built into other tools to perform specific tasks (so a little very basic CS could be helpful) but nothing along the lines of "real" programming.

    For a minor, this is the only advice you need:
    Take whatever the fuck you want. Find something you enjoy or that interests you. Find something that will be hard to pick up after you graduate (a spanish minor will get you far more than trying to take some crappy once a week class for an hour after work at the language acquisition center).
    This whole thing is about making you a better person not preparing you for a specific career. Since you are pursueing a professional program, that part becomes more about a career so why not use your minor to do something fun/different (or just take classes you find interesting and say screw the minor since exactly zero people will care about your minor after you graduate).
     
  13. Sazerac

    Sazerac Senior member

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    Colorado
    Would a business admin minor be helpful, I was going to major in it before I transferred to a school with an ARCH degree, so it wouldn't be too much of a stretch to get my minor in that.

    FWIW, a close friend of mine is a very prominent architect. He's much older than I am (in his 60's) and often says that the single best way arch schools could be improved is to incorporate more business management classes. He's the head of a large firm and had to learn all the business stuff on his own.

    Just throwing that out there.
     
  14. ryanlvv

    ryanlvv Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the responses. I think that I will just forget the minor since it won't even matter by the time I get my M.Arch. I'll take practical classes that can help me out like drawing, interior design, landscape arch, some philosophy (I'm a fan.) some useful business classes when and if I can fit'em all in.
     
  15. RSS

    RSS Senior member

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    I speak as an architect.

    Art History ... with special attention given to architectural history.
     
  16. venessian

    venessian Senior member

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    Sò più de eà che de qua.
    I would generally agree with RSS, but I think it does depend also on what your long-term goals in architecture are (and to some extent to which graduate school(s) you will be applying). If you want to go into design, then definitely art/art history/architectural history. If you intend to pursue other facets of architecture, other avenues might serve you better.

    I see that the program you will attend provides a non-accredited B.S.Arch. degree; given that, you should certainly be able to design your own minor, as you stated above, rather than follow a pre-determined minor, in order to flush out your undergraduate degree as fully as possible.
     
  17. Tangfastic

    Tangfastic Senior member

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    I studied archaeology and a lot of architects took modules with us on the historical buildings side; things like vernacular architecture, castles and great houses, ecclesiastical architecture. You'll need to know about the Greek and Roman stuff for when you're sticking pilasters on the front of some suburban shoebox.

    Find out which faculty (archeology, classics, anthropology, art history) offers these subjects.
     
  18. RSS

    RSS Senior member

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    I would generally agree with RSS, but I think it does depend also on what your long-term goals in architecture are (and to some extent to which graduate school(s) you will be applying). If you want to go into design, then definitely art/art history/architectural history. If you intend to pursue other facets of architecture, other avenues might serve you better.
    You make a good point. I tend to assume design rather other avenues such as the business side or urban planning (via grad school).


    I studied archaeology and a lot of architects took modules with us on the historical buildings side; things like vernacular architecture, castles and great houses, ecclesiastical architecture. You'll need to know about the Greek and Roman stuff for when you're sticking pilasters on the front of some suburban shoebox.

    Find out which faculty (archeology, classics, anthropology, art history) offers these subjects.

    I certainly aprove of your last comment. But, Tangfastic, please note that some of us actually work on historical restorations of buildings and a knowledge of the classical orders (be it those set to paper by Vitrivus or Vignola) is critical. Not everyone is "sticking pilasters" on some McMansion. Of course, if the place is a swankienda by John Staub, I might approve.
     
  19. yachtie

    yachtie Senior member

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    You make a good point. I tend to assume design rather other avenues such as the business side or urban planning (via grad school). I certainly aprove of your last comment. But, Tangfastic, please note that some of us actually work on historical restorations of buildings and a knowledge of the classical orders (be it those set to paper by Vitrivus or Vignola) is critical. Not everyone is "sticking pilasters" on some McMansion. Of course, if the place is a swankienda by John Staub, I might approve.
    Do most/some/or not many architects do their own structural engineering? Correct me if I'm wrong please but is SE part of architecture majors?
     
  20. RSS

    RSS Senior member

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    Do most/some/or not many architects do their own structural engineering? Correct me if I'm wrong please but is SE part of architecture majors?
    My program required 16 hours of Structural Engineering course work. That said, most architects I know work with a fully licensed professional or structural engineer. I know of very few who received degrees in both architecture and structural engineering.

    That said, I have often engineered smaller residential projects, but wouldn't consider taking on that role with a larger project.
     

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