NB? - Sport Coat vs. Blazer

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Nektopoli, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. Nektopoli

    Nektopoli Active Member

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    Newbie question, I'm looking on Bluefly at blazers and was wondering what are the differences between a Blazer and a Sport Coat.

    On another note anyone have a Bluefly coupon?

    NP
     


  2. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

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    Traditionally a blazer is blue or black (now more navy afaik) with metal buttons, while a sport coat is any odd jacket designed to be worn without matching pants.
     


  3. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    Agreed. I'd add that for the average person or store's vocabulary, they are synonymous, except when they actually mean what we think of as a blazer by "blazer". Typically, these will be the more traditional style outfits, like BB, Polo, etc.
     


  4. Nektopoli

    Nektopoli Active Member

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    Should I expect the "blazer" to need the same amount of tailoring as a suit jacket?

    NP
     


  5. ViroBono

    ViroBono Senior member

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    Blazers are by no means restricted to navy or black: [​IMG] The classic blazer, however, is usually navy, double-breasted with 6 buttons (2 to fasten). Badges are not usually worn on the pocket, except by schoolchildren and members of sports clubs (as above), though those entitled may wear regimental or service buttons.
     


  6. Stereojeff

    Stereojeff Well-Known Member

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    I thought the traditional blazer also had patch pockets.

    Jeff
     


  7. WJTW

    WJTW Well-Known Member

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    In some occasions even the suit jacket is called a 'blazer' by some stores.

    WJTW
     


  8. AlanC

    AlanC Minister of Trad

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    Unexplainable pet peeve: I hate it when sports coats in general are called blazers. Double breasted blazers have a nautical origin and single breasted come from the club jacket (as pictured above). Paired with gray trousers they can be just a notch below the suit in formality. Quite frankly, I think everyone needs a navy blazer.
     


  9. ViroBono

    ViroBono Senior member

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    I sympathise with your sentiment. Sartorial misnomers are disproportionately annoying. You will be pleased to know that in the UK we never call sports jackets 'blazers' - nor do we call jackets 'coats', or trousers 'pants', or pants 'shorts', or waistcoats 'vests', or vests 'undershirts', or Fox News 'balanced', etc. etc. The other day I was reading a report by a US Army officer, on exchange duty with the British Army, on how he found his posting - a whole section was devoted to the confusion caused by the above dissimilarities in descriptions. Two nations, separated by a common language..... [​IMG]
     


  10. Trilby

    Trilby Senior member

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    Very true, ViroBono. Most people in Britain would only refer to a coat as meaning an overcoat and a vest as meaning an undershirt (frequently in the context of a string vest). Clothing snobs would be horrified by using "American" words to describe clothes.

    However, I find it very strange that real tailors in Britain -- including on Savile Row -- use these words with their American meanings. They talk about coats (as part of 2-piece suits), coatmakers, vestmakers, etc. There is obviously some historical basis for the American meanings and I suspect that the American meanings may be older than the modern British usage.

    Can anyone here help with the etymology of these words? I know there are other examples where British and US words were used the same way in the past, but the British usage evolved over time while the US usage remained closer to the original.

    Trilby
     


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