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Navy pinstripe suit

DonRaphael

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Why not a true navy? I feel that the dark navy you posted is too dark (midnight) and the bright navy is a shade too bright. TBH it’s hard for me to tell the scale/spacing of the stripes on the swatches you posted. I’d want to get a better idea of that before making a decision.
Thanks for your input. The pictures were just examples. I agree with you and am not yet completely sure what the fabrics look like. I just wanted to know the general concensus towards bright/dark pinstriped suits. I'll probably need to order swatches before deciding to better understand the navy shades and the scale of the stripes. The pictures are from the mill. There're no other pics available.
 

breakaway01

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Yes I agree with looking at swatches. In my experience, the suit will look a shade lighter than the swatch when made up—if you’re on the fence, go a little darker rather than lighter.
Like DWW I also like chalkstripes. At least consider a flannel chalkstripe.
 

adrianvo

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Why not a true navy? I feel that the dark navy you posted is too dark (midnight) and the bright navy is a shade too bright. TBH it’s hard for me to tell the scale/spacing of the stripes on the swatches you posted. I’d want to get a better idea of that before making a decision.
The spacing is probably quite narrow. Assuming the fabric samples are normal in size, and you usually don't see the vertical spacing between the pinstripes unless you see it up close.
Thanks for your input. The pictures were just examples. I agree with you and am not yet completely sure what the fabrics look like. I just wanted to know the general concensus towards bright/dark pinstriped suits. I'll probably need to order swatches before deciding to better understand the navy shades and the scale of the stripes. The pictures are from the mill. There're no other pics available.
Good luck! 😁
 

maxalex

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Pinstripe is a business fabric. When you try to make it bolder or less business-like, you make it an orphaned style, like people here who commission green or red oxfords. Lots of stuff on here has lost its language in this way. The outfits become rootless, clashing, and nonsensical.

Prefer chalkstripes over pinstripes. But between the two fabrics the OP listed, I would go for the darker color. The brighter fabric is very #pitttiuomo.

If the OP doesn't have to wear pinstripe suits to work, I think he should pick a different fabric. Choose something that makes sense for your lifestyle. Think about how fabrics and styles are used traditionally to communicate certain things. Wearing a bright, bold pinstripe to social bars will look awkward. And it will not look right for the office.
Agreed. Pinstripes are very power-suit. Chalkstripes are more subtle. Either in a brighter blue will look a bit “Guys and Dolls.” You might instead consider a subtle windowpane check like this suit I had made recently. (Inspired by a similar one I saw Bryan Ferry wearing.) It still looks quite formal but softer and more approachable than stripes of any kind.
1620226988787.jpeg
 

DonRaphael

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Those of you that have more experience and owns chalk stripe suits; do you opt for woollen flannel over worsted wool?

I've never owned a suit in woollen flannel, so I'm wondering how it holds up over time? I've been reading a lot and while I can acknowledge the advantages of a woollen flannel (especially for a chalk striped suit), I'm put off by the fact that many people claim that woollen looses it's crease and shape over time and becomes baggy. I suppose the weigh of the fabric is a determining factor as well. The fabric I'm currently looking at is 340 gms/10 oz. My understanding from reading is that 12-13 oz is ideal for woollen flannel. But with well heated offices/building I feel like 12-13 oz is to heavy.
 

dieworkwear

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Those of you that have more experience and owns chalk stripe suits; do you opt for woollen flannel over worsted wool?

I've never owned a suit in woollen flannel, so I'm wondering how it holds up over time? I've been reading a lot and while I can acknowledge the advantages of a woollen flannel (especially for a chalk striped suit), I'm put off by the fact that many people claim that woollen looses it's crease and shape over time and becomes baggy. I suppose the weigh of the fabric is a determining factor as well. The fabric I'm currently looking at is 340 gms/10 oz. My understanding from reading is that 12-13 oz is ideal for woollen flannel. But with well heated offices/building I feel like 12-13 oz is to heavy.
Do you mean woolen versus worsted flannel?

Woolen versus worsted refers to how the hairs are treated before they're spun into yarn. Worsted wool is a very large category. Worsted flannel is a type of worsted wool. Would make more sense to compare woolen flannel to worsted flannel.

Worsted flannel is slightly more durable than woolen flannel, all things equal. However, it doesn't have the same cloudiness or nap. If you want a very lightweight flannel, it will also have to be a worsted flannel.

It's true that woolen is more prone to bagging and doesn't hold a crease as well.

Chalkstripe flannel comes in both worsted and woolen form.

Personally don't like very lightweight flannel (9/10oz) or very heavy flannel (16oz). Once you get into high numbers, it doesn't look very good -- something about the shape of the garment is off. Lightweight flannel also bags too easily. There are better options. IMO, the sweet spot for flannel is 12 to 14oz.

Are you getting this custom made? Always best to just ask your tailor. Discuss how you plan to use the suit, the climate, and your experience with other fabrics. Some people find flannel to wear very warm.
 

DonRaphael

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Do you mean woolen versus worsted flannel?

Woolen versus worsted refers to how the hairs are treated before they're spun into yarn. Worsted wool is a very large category. Worsted flannel is a type of worsted wool. Would make more sense to compare woolen flannel to worsted flannel.

Worsted flannel is slightly more durable than woolen flannel, all things equal. However, it doesn't have the same cloudiness or nap. If you want a very lightweight flannel, it will also have to be a worsted flannel.

It's true that woolen is more prone to bagging and doesn't hold a crease as well.

Chalkstripe flannel comes in both worsted and woolen form.

Personally don't like very lightweight flannel (9/10oz) or very heavy flannel (16oz). Once you get into high numbers, it doesn't look very good -- something about the shape of the garment is off. Lightweight flannel also bags too easily. There are better options. IMO, the sweet spot for flannel is 12 to 14oz.

Are you getting this custom made? Always best to just ask your tailor. Discuss how you plan to use the suit, the climate, and your experience with other fabrics. Some people find flannel to wear very warm.
Thanks for the quick reply, mate. Appreciate it. Sorry, yes woollen vs worsted flannels.

I have several (non-woollen) flannel trousers which I like. But I've never owned a (wollen) flannel suit. Hence my question(s). I plan on having the suit custom made but not at a local tailor.

The bagginess and inability to hold a crease are the things that worry me. If heavier fabrics are indeed less prone to bagging and loosing their crease, I'll look for 12-14 oz when considering woollen flannels.

With regards to bagginess, what are we talking about here: do woollen flannels loose their shape within a dozen wears, 50 or 100? Do you have any pics of well worn woollen flannel suits? I'd love to see what they look like after some wear.

Also, since it's a chalk stripe I'm looking at, it'll probably not get as much wear as the solid suits. Should I still get two pair of trousers because of it's lesser durability?
 

dieworkwear

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Thanks for the quick reply, mate. Appreciate it. Sorry, yes woollen vs worsted flannels.

I have several (non-woollen) flannel trousers which I like. But I've never owned a (wollen) flannel suit. Hence my question(s). I plan on having the suit custom made but not at a local tailor.

The bagginess and inability to hold a crease are the things that worry me. If heavier fabrics are indeed less prone to bagging and loosing their crease, I'll look for 12-14 oz when considering woollen flannels.

With regards to bagginess, what are we talking about here: do woollen flannels loose their shape within a dozen wears, 50 or 100? Do you have any pics of well worn woollen flannel suits? I'd love to see what they look like after some wear.

Also, since it's a chalk stripe I'm looking at, it'll probably not get as much wear as the solid suits. Should I still get two pair of trousers because of it's lesser durability?
If you have worsted flannel trousers and like them, then you'll like a flannel suit. The bagging and inability to hold a crease mostly refers to the trousers.

Difference between worsted and woolen flannel will be marginal in terms of bagging and creasing.
 

breakaway01

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Knowing how to press a pair of trousers at home is very helpful. It is not difficult to clean up the legs. A clapper is very helpful to set a good crease.
 

TheChihuahua

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It’s just a personal preference. I just prefer solids and checks. I like the way they look. I just don’t think they look good on me.

I don’t work in finance or a profession that requires me to wear a suit, so when I do wear one, it’s usually for social occasions. A pinstripe suit just makes it look like I came in from the office.

it’s probably why I like the bolder, higher contrast fabric.

Again, just my opinion.
that makes sense

but in a professional setting pin stripe is a good look.
I usually opt for the darker background with the pin stripe as it seems less playful. For more of social attire maybe go lighter.
 

clee1982

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I would wear navy pinestripe no problem, it can be business loud, but then just make sure everything else is serious I don't see a problem (as in no funny color shoes etc.)

like this
1620873626598.png


the guy standing, without white waist coat in real world...

1620873666241.png
 

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