1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

mytailor.com houston stop - SF made me a bad customer

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by raley, Jun 10, 2006.

  1. raley

    raley Senior member

    Messages:
    781
    Joined:
    May 22, 2004
    I'm a bit unclear on the bit about making the sleeves 1/2" too long because your'e not used to shirts with perfect-length sleeves. Was he saying that based upon the shirt you were wearing he thought you were used to longer sleeves and thus would be disappointed if you actually got sleeves the length you were requesting (and thus he would make them 1/2" longer than you were requesting) or what?
    Sounds like a disappointing and frustrating experience - bummer. [​IMG]



    The shirt that I was wearing happened to have sleeves that were probably 1" too long. I knew that they were too long and told him this. As he was measuring my sleeve length, he told folded up the cuff on the shirt that I was wearing, indicating that would be the length of the sleeves on the shirts he would make for me.

    The folded up cuff hit me about halfway between the end of my wrist and the beginning of my thumb - about 1/2" too long. He then told me he would be making them this length, 1/2" too long, because I would feel that sleeves that were the correct length were too short, since I was wearing a shirt that had sleeves that were too long.

    In other words, what you said is correct.
     
  2. raley

    raley Senior member

    Messages:
    781
    Joined:
    May 22, 2004
    You're better off not getting the shirts. If you feel like it I would say email the co. and tell them of your experience. Maybe you can get this guy fired. I had a similar experience at Siam Palace in Bangkok and it got to the point where I told the salesperson that I fit movie stars in America all the time and I knew what I wanted. As a rule I don't bring out the big guns but the whole experience turned into a battle about who's right when imo the customer is ALWAYS right.

    I was thinking of emailing the company, but I am still not sure about it. It is disappointing, because I wanted a tailor to measure me and make me custom shirts! Unfortunately I was not able to get that. If I work with someone who is knowledegable in Joe H., it still will not satisfy me as it will basically be the same experience as I'm used to which is ordering shirts sight unseen based on my measurements.
     
  3. Vintage Gent

    Vintage Gent Senior member

    Messages:
    2,748
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2003
    Location:
    The People's Republic of Galveston
    It is disappointing, because I wanted a tailor to measure me and make me custom shirts! Unfortunately I was not able to get that. If I work with someone who is knowledegable in Joe H., it still will not satisfy me as it will basically be the same experience as I'm used to which is ordering shirts sight unseen based on my measurements.

    Raley, I know it's frustrating, but if you can wait until November, Chan will be back in Houston for its November tour. No order minimum. And at around $100 a pop, not much more than you were going to pay mytailor.
     
  4. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

    Messages:
    3,769
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Location:
    Primrose Hill, London
    As a rule I don't bring out the big guns but the whole experience turned into a battle about who's right when imo the customer is ALWAYS right.

    I would say yes and no on this old adage. I have a friend who if left to his own devices would come out of his tailors wearing the most abominable things. Luckily his tailor has the good sense to recognize this and acts as somewhat of a consultant, letting my friend know when his choices would not be "right".

    If you have a really good tailor, you go to him not only for the quality of his work, but for his expertise, which is invaluable. Sometimes his expertise may result in a situation where your choices may not be "right"

    K
     
  5. acidboy

    acidboy Senior member

    Messages:
    21,170
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2006
    i think this is a case of a seller with a short fuse (at that time, at least) and an exacting buyer.
     
  6. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    3,336
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2003
    Location:
    NYC
    Raley, if you give Hamilton and/or Saigon a try, I'd be interested to hear about your experiences. I've purchased most of my recent shirts through Chan, although it would be nice to have a reasonable local option with a slightly more expansive fabric selection.


    I have seen shirts by both Hamilton and Saigon. I will not vouch for fit, only construction and fabrics. Hamilton will have one of the best selections of fabrics in the USA.

    At least the shirts are being made locally and you have someone to talk to. Even though English at Saigon might be weak, you can at least talk to Lan at Saigon. she is the woman who runs Saigon with her brother. Her English is decent in that weird Vietnamese English accent.

    With the off shore shirmakers, the shirts just show up. What expert is going to evaluate the fit.

    Carl

    www.cego.com
     
  7. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    16,118
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Location:
    Tombstone
    The shirt that I was wearing happened to have sleeves that were probably 1" too long. I knew that they were too long and told him this. As he was measuring my sleeve length, he told folded up the cuff on the shirt that I was wearing, indicating that would be the length of the sleeves on the shirts he would make for me.

    The folded up cuff hit me about halfway between the end of my wrist and the beginning of my thumb - about 1/2" too long. He then told me he would be making them this length, 1/2" too long, because I would feel that sleeves that were the correct length were too short, since I was wearing a shirt that had sleeves that were too long.


    Are you sure he wasn't allowing extra length for shrinkage/bending of the arm? Unbuttoned, all properly fitting shirt sleeves extend past the wrist. It sounds like he was making them the proper length, unless I'm misreading your post or you have very long hands.
     
  8. rajesh06

    rajesh06 Senior member

    Messages:
    365
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004

    I picked side pleats and asked for a split yoke. He had no idea with a split yoke was. I tried explaining, and showed him the split yoke on my shirt, but he still was confused. I told him to forget about the split yoke.



    I've been buying custom shirts at Barton & Donaldson in Philly. Their position is that the split yoke and pleats are needed for RTW shirts so that they are more "flexible" - but are generally not needed for Bespoke.
     
  9. DocHolliday

    DocHolliday Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    16,118
    Joined:
    Apr 21, 2005
    Location:
    Tombstone
    I've been buying custom shirts at Barton & Donaldson in Philly. Their position is that the split yoke and pleats are needed for RTW shirts so that they are more "flexible" - but are generally not needed for Bespoke.

    A split yoke serves no purpose on RTW shirts, except to look pretty. If you think about it, a split yoke in RTW is essentially the same as a single piece of cloth; it consists of two matching pieces that have been sewn together in the middle.
     
  10. TCN

    TCN Senior member

    Messages:
    1,505
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2004
    When I was younger, I let tailors talk me into what they liked and what they thought was better, etc. Although I certainly value their input, if they appear ignorant or insistent, I walk . . . simple as that.

    Few if any professions are allowed to dictate what the customer gets despite presenting the customer options, I see no reason why a tailor should be any different.
     
  11. rajesh06

    rajesh06 Senior member

    Messages:
    365
    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    But if you nevertheless prefer them aesthetically, will they refuse to use them?

    Don't know becuase I never asked. I am very satisfied with their shirts - so I have never really pressed the point.

    This may be a case of: if one is paying $220 for a shirt, one will trust the judgment of the tailor; if one is paying $75 - one tends to question more!
     
  12. stach

    stach Senior member

    Messages:
    578
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    What's the point of having a custom made item if you can't order what you want? A good salesperson will explain added expenses but if you don't like the finished product it would be your own fault, unless the workmanship was bad.
     
  13. gdl203

    gdl203 Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

    Messages:
    36,649
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2005
    Location:
    New York
    A split yoke serves no purpose on RTW shirts, except to look pretty. If you think about it, a split yoke in RTW is essentially the same as a single piece of cloth; it consists of two matching pieces that have been sewn together in the middle.

    Absolutely. The only reason a tailor would say something like that is to cut a few minutes of labor time, a few inches of fabric and make a a few more bucks...
     
  14. raley

    raley Senior member

    Messages:
    781
    Joined:
    May 22, 2004
    Are you sure he wasn't allowing extra length for shrinkage/bending of the arm? Unbuttoned, all properly fitting shirt sleeves extend past the wrist. It sounds like he was making them the proper length, unless I'm misreading your post or you have very long hands.

    Well, I suppose that could be the reason, but what I said in my post is exactly what he said:

    If I weren't used to long sleeves (how does he know this anyway? [​IMG] ), he would make the sleeves the normal length. Instead, since I am in fact used to longer sleeves (again, according to him), he was going to make them slightly too long.

    It confused me as well.
     
  15. raley

    raley Senior member

    Messages:
    781
    Joined:
    May 22, 2004
    Got it, thanks. How obnoxious! Sounds like you handled the situation with much more equanimity than I might have. I'd vote in favor of your sending the company an email. The tone of your post is quite reasonable and factual, and I'm sure that would come through in any email. They ought to know, and ought to want to know, how they are being represented "out in the field" by their employees/contractors.

    Maybe I will do this. I am actually quite interested in what Joe H. would say. I tried to be as reasonable as I could. I don't have much bargaining power aside from the fact that I am the customer. I am young and I didn't want to walk in acting like a know-it-all that is trying to make the tailor look stupid (kind of like when someone walks into a bar and orders something obscure to try to impress his date by stumping the bartender).
     
  16. realbespoke

    realbespoke Member

    Messages:
    9
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2006
    Location:
    Chicago and St. Louis
    [​IMG] the old saying "you get what you pay for!" First, If you showed him a split yoke and he did not know what it was, that was the grand opportunity to walk right out the door. Second, anyone who has seen any type of Mother of pearl button whether its Australian or not knows the difference between MOP and plastic! Typical of these guys though. They give the industry a bad name. And none of them are well dressed, ever! so why buy from a guy that looks worse than you? makes no sense.
    We produce shirts with split yokes standard, MOP buttons standard, and we usually place the monograms inside the yoke. We only use the best Italian and English shirting cloth. The shirt is hand-made!
    www.marlonaustin.com
     
  17. montmorency

    montmorency Senior member

    Messages:
    188
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    When I went to a shirt maker that gets a lot of play on this board and asked him about a split yoke, he was completely dismissive. He told me that most shirts that seem to have split yokes only have a sewn seam in the single piece of fabric to give the impression of a split yoke. He also told me that split yokes serve no purpose. So, you can encounter resistance on some of these details with a few people in the business.
     
  18. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    3,336
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2003
    Location:
    NYC
    As a customer looking to have shirts made, you have to decide what is most important to you, or what combination of these things.

    Fit
    Fabric
    Needlework
    Price
    aesthetic details and a multitude of options.
    Timely delivery and customer service


    Someone out there with too much time on their hands should set up a grid and see where the various vendors fall.

    Carl
     
  19. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

    Messages:
    3,769
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Location:
    Primrose Hill, London
    True enough. But if your tailor recommends x, and you politely tell him that you understand what he's saying but still want y, you're ultimately talking about your garment, not his. Now if you were asking him to do something he simply didn't feel comfortable doing because he thought it would be unprofessional or would look so bad that he would be embarrassed to have people see it, of course it's his perogative to refuse. But the "you can't handle the truth!" attitude raley encountered sounds to me like it stems more from ignorance, trepidation, and pettiness than some deeply-held sense of professional standards. (Especially since it's not even clear, at least to me, that the person Raley was dealing with was the person who would be performing or overseeing the construction of his shirts.)

    Ohhhh I thoroughly agree with you and also with Raley's handling and assessment of his experience. I don’t mean to imply that he should have sucked it up and taken the tailors word as the "gospel". It sounds like he knows enough about what he wants and of course the aesthetic decisions should be his to make. I also would not have felt comfortable having my shirts made there, no matter how good the deal.

    I was referring more to a generic situation of going to an "expert" for a specialized or bespoke service and quoting the famous "customer is always right" line rather than using their expertise. Likely more applicable when going to Patrick or Carl than at mytailor.com.

    I guess some of my attitude comes from being a consultant. In my cases, the customer is quite frequently “wrong”, and even though they sometimes don’t want to admit it, that’s the reason that they hire us.

    K
     
  20. VKK3450

    VKK3450 Senior member

    Messages:
    3,769
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2004
    Location:
    Primrose Hill, London
    And none of them are well dressed, ever! so why buy from a guy that looks worse than you? makes no sense.
    www.marlonaustin.com


    Well, what's the saying? The shoemaker's children always go barefoot? Plumber's faucets always leak? Sober bartenders (yeah right)...

    (What's wrong with me? 5 posts ago I was refuting the validity of old sayings, and now I am spouting them)

    K
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by