My first Antiquing Project: Transform a pair of peanut butter brown oxfords

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by heard546, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. heard546

    heard546 Senior member

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    After readings Steven’s and Ron’s threads on their antiquing project I decided to take on my on adventure. The shoes are a pair of hand made Bettaccini in peanut butter brown I recently had up for sale, but decided to experiment on them after being motivated by the other forum members. Below are pictures of the first original shoes without an work done on them other than a shine.

    Before
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    After deglazing using Angelus Leather Cleaner & Deglazer
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    First Application of Angelus Medium Brown B Leather Finisher (Total 2 Applications)
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    Applied 2 Applications of Lexol
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    Applied Kiwi Tan Shoe Polish (Total 2 Applications) and Kiwi Cordovan Shoe Polish (Total 1 Applications) for a dark tone of brown[​IMG]
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    I didn't use shoe cream because I couldn't find any store that carried this product near my home.


    I welcome your feedback, and opinions. Take into consideration that this is my first attempt, and will probably attempt
    this task again on a pair of tyran rose loafers I have in storage.

    I will provide lessons learned and additional insights later. A storm is coming, and I have venture out to get dinner for the family.


    -tony
     


  2. oneade

    oneade Well-Known Member

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    what is deglazing? how did you get the color off?
     


  3. sartort

    sartort Senior member

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    you answered your first question with your second.


    To the OP, thanks for documenting this. It's nice to see what the deglazing process actually looks like. I am considering doing my own project and this will certainly help take the fear of the unknown factor away.

    I look forward to seeing photos of the next steps. Good luck!
     


  4. Nicholas

    Nicholas Senior member

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    what is deglazing? how did you get the color off?

    Acetone most likely.
     


  5. Chips

    Chips Senior member

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    I'm eagerly waiting to see the end of this job.
     


  6. meister

    meister Senior member

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    Wonderful so far.

    Amazingly they look like if you gave them some leather conditioner in their present state you would have a very nice pair of (sort of) Paul Smith Dip Dyed Starrs
     


  7. kryn13

    kryn13 Senior member

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    Very interesting in seeing how these turn out.
     


  8. antirabbit

    antirabbit Senior member

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    Got Trees?
     


  9. flipster

    flipster Senior member

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    ^ +1

    those shoes don't look like you're using shoe-trees. Correct me if I'm wrong.

    Very interesting project though, looking forward to the pics of the next stage.
     


  10. heard546

    heard546 Senior member

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    I have shoes, but not using at this time. I've only the shoes 2 months, and tried to decide to keep or sale. Decided to keep, and will be using shoe treesgoing forward.

    ^ +1

    those shoes don't look like you're using shoe-trees. Correct me if I'm wrong.

    Very interesting project though, looking forward to the pics of the next stage.
     


  11. Francisco D'Anconia

    Francisco D'Anconia Senior member

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    I've done a couple of jobs like this after reading Ron's thread too. My shoes looked similar to the OP's after deglazing.

    you answered your first question with your second.


    To the OP, thanks for documenting this. It's nice to see what the deglazing process actually looks like. I am considering doing my own project and this will certainly help take the fear of the unknown factor away.

    I look forward to seeing photos of the next steps. Good luck!


    IMHO, make your first attempt on a pair of shoes you don't mind ruining. If you don't have a pair youcan ruin without regret, go buy a pair at a thrift store. Make sure they're not black. It's too hard to do this on black shoes. The lighter the original color in brown the easier the time I've found.

    You should be able to by Deglazer from most shoe repair shops. If they don't have it in stock, they can order it for you. You can also order it over the Internet.
     


  12. Steven Aver

    Steven Aver Senior member

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    After readings Steven's and Ron's threads on their antiquing project I decided to take on my on adventure. The shoes are a pair of hand made Bettaccini in peanut butter brown I recently had up for sale, but decided to experiment on them after being motivated by the other forum members. Below are pictures of the first original shoes without an work done on them other than a shine.



    Next step is to apply brown color leather dye. I will provide the dye brand name with my next posting.

    -tony



    Looking good. Make sure you insert your trees after you dye them. I would stuff newspaper into the shoes before you start the dying process, and then insert your trees when you start applying cream and wax so that you can work without all the creases being in place. Good luck.
     


  13. ccffm1

    ccffm1 Senior member

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    I've done a couple of jobs like this after reading Ron's thread too. My shoes looked similar to the OP's after deglazing.

    Have you used aceton for deglazing? And if so, in which concentration?
     


  14. bigbris1

    bigbris1 Senior member

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    Make sure they're not black. It's too hard to do this on black shoes.

    Please explain (pics necessary).
     


  15. sartort

    sartort Senior member

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    +1. I started a thread this week in which a poster linked to an older thread in which he describes taking a pair of black lobbs and turning them brown. I am tempted to do the same. It makes sense that a lighter colored shoe (tan) would be closer to the original unfinished leather than a black one would. In that sense it might give you more options in what color you would the shoes to become. But if you are going for a grey-brown or pewter color, it seems black would be as suitable as a tan pair would (speaking of course from no experience). I hate to derail the thread, but am curious in the meantime until the dye shots are posted. Looking forward to seeing those.
     


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