My Bespoke Suit Designed by Michael Andrews Bespoke

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Vittorio J, Nov 12, 2008.

  1. calvinloke

    calvinloke Senior member

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    A bit of an overkill to me
     


  2. Eason

    Eason Bicurious Racist

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    The vest/pants at least looks like they fit you well. I never thought I'd see a non-korean buy a suit with pick stitching... guess anything can happen.
     


  3. rssmsvc

    rssmsvc Senior member

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    In the shoulder pic it looks like it is bunching up around your neck.
     


  4. antirabbit

    antirabbit Senior member

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    Michael Andrew is not really offering a bespoke product, more of a MTM product.
    Also, it seems as though your collar is not hand attached.
    A bit gauche for my taste.
     


  5. Shirtmaven

    Shirtmaven Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    looks like decent work.
    My main obeservation is that there are too many details that will make this suit look very dated in a year. if not already.

    if you had just used the paisley lining, then it would have been fine.
    the blue buttonholes and blue pick stitiching look very last year to me.

    Carl
     


  6. Vittorio J

    Vittorio J Active Member

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    Hey Carl...long time no email...hope you are doing well...
     


  7. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    A few details lead me to believe this was made in Asia / Hong Kong. The only reason I am commenting is I think the term "Bespoke" is over used, misused and the meaning is watered down and used in a generalized way these days.
     


  8. jefferyd

    jefferyd Senior member Dubiously Honored

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  9. Vittorio J

    Vittorio J Active Member

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    Thats a great blog post...
     


  10. Despos

    Despos Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Thank you for inspiring another blog post.

    That was fast! Would you explain a "sandwich construction".
     


  11. le.gentleman

    le.gentleman Senior member

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    Thank you for inspiring another blog post.

    I just read the first postings of your blog - seems to be very nice so far! I'll have to read the rest of it later.
     


  12. jefferyd

    jefferyd Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    That was fast! Would you explain a "sandwich construction".

    In bespoke tailoring there are as many ways of making a collar as there are tailors, but at certain levels of RTW/MTM there are two main methods of attaching a collar. One is the classic method and the other what I have always referred to as the sandwich collar. Of course, this may differ from others' usage, but here is mine;

    The classic and sandwich both begin at the gorge- the seam where the collar is sewn to the facing. The top collar is sewn to the facing along the gorge, stopping a bit short of the curve; the gorge is opened and tacked, then the lining is basted into the neck line.

    In the classic method, the rest of the top collar is turned over and the undercollar, which is still free, is basted along the neck line. The collar is then felled by hand or by machine. The result is quite solid.

    In the sandwich method the 2/3 of the neck seam of the top collar which correspond to the back of the jacket has been turned and basted in place; when sewing the gorge one sews up to the turn back and stops. The undercollar is basted in place, leaving the top collar free. The jacket is then turned over and the finished edge of the top collar (the one that was turned and basted) is basted in place. This edge is then felled using an AMF or Complett (pick stitch) machine, going through all layers. Since you can't tack using the AMF this is quite a bit less sturdy.

    The gorge/neck seam on a classic jacket is rounded where the gorge line meets the neck line; the sandwiched top collar is squared.

    In both methods, all layers are held together more or less firmly and will not move. In the zig-zag application, they can not be held together unless tacked with an AMF machine similarly to the sandwich method; most makers who use this method prefer to do it with glue instead.

    Classic

    [​IMG]

    Sandwich

    [​IMG]

    If I am mistaken, please correct me.

    J
     


  13. Vittorio J

    Vittorio J Active Member

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    I'm very impressed with your blog jefferyd...one of the best meanswear blog on the Web in my opinion...
     


  14. penguin vic

    penguin vic Senior member

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    I never thought I'd see a non-korean buy a suit with pick stitching... guess anything can happen.

    Um ... what the? Pick stitching is pretty common these days ... even on OTR.
     


  15. Azure

    Azure Senior member

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    None of the photos shows how it fits ... which is more important than gaudy contrast pick stitching :p (personal preference, I know). Slanted sleeve button holes are .. interesting.

    +1

    please post!
     


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