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Mountain Bikes

acidboy

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Need some suggestions:

I'm considering getting a mountain bike. Nothing fancy, 90% of the time I'll just ride it around our very hilly neighborhood, and might go into very easy trails but I probably won't go beyond that. I've been educating myself with different bikes and from what reviews I've read, it seems Giant's Yukon FX is the top choice, but I'm not sure if I need the double suspensions. Should I just stay with a good decent entry level hardtail bike? And what models should I look for? Of course- cheaper would be better.
 

bbaquiran

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My first MTB was a Giant Yukon or Rincon hardtail, don't remember which.

If you're sticking to mostly road and light trails, you'll be fine with a hardtail. Just make sure you get decent brakes, shifters (Deore at least) and suspension tuned to your weight and riding style. I would stay away from the lowest-level dual suspension bikes as the suspension designs and components usually aren't very good (lots of non-adjustable single pivot stuff).

I still have a Giant XTC set up as a singlespeed at my folks' house but these days I prefer my road bike.
 

mikej77

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I have been riding for years, great way to get some exercise. Honestly if you are just riding on streets, or even doing basic trails, you do not need a full suspension bike. The only time I use my full suspension bike (Scott Ransom) is when I am doing serious downhill riding. Treks are great bikes for the price. Just pick a basic model that fits in your price range. One upgrade that is totally worth it are clipless pedals. It makes riding safer and helps your performance. Basic sets like the Shimano MP324 only cost about $45 and allow you to use regular shoes or cycling shoes.
 

KBW

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build your own. Research and buy the frame, suspension, etc that suits you. I built the one I'm currently riding a few months ago and I love it.
 

voxsartoria

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If you are riding street and easy trails, I'm not sure that even front suspension is needed.

But if you must have an MTB, I would suggest:

- Front suspension only

- Disc brakes

- Clipless pedals

Full suspension is definitely overkill, and adds complexity and cost that is not needed for the kind of riding that you plan to do.

Bikes like this are bread and butter for Trek, Specialized, Giant, Cannondale...visit your local bike shot and ride a few...see what you like.


- B
 

Syl

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go to mtbr.com for good postings.
My $0.02:
1) get a hardtail
2) lighter=better to a point; then it's just a waste of money
3) you can get a good frame and upgrade the components later
4)
 

bmulford

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Specialized is well suited for your entry point. A rockhopper is a relatively inexpensive, reasonably quality ride.
 

velobran

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Originally Posted by bmulford
Specialized is well suited for your entry point. A rockhopper is a relatively inexpensive, reasonably quality ride.

+ 1. A Rockhopper was my first MTB . Then I upgraded to an Epic once I was into more technical trails.

If I was to just hang out in the singletrack scene or ride around hilly roads, I'd stick with hardtail. You'll get more for your money.
 

Full Canvas

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Originally Posted by acidicboy
I'm considering getting a mountain bike. Nothing fancy, 90% of the time I'll just ride it around our very hilly neighborhood, and might go into very easy trails but I probably won't go beyond that.

Originally Posted by voxsartoria
If you are riding street and easy trails, I'm not sure that even front suspension is needed.

Full suspension is definitely overkill, and adds complexity and cost that is not needed for the kind of riding that you plan to do.


- B



For what you stated, I agree with voxsartoria's remarks. Since Ellsworth's design offices are in my backyard, I was able to acquire a second-hand Joker mule (Ellsworth full suspension) in 2000. It took me a while to learn to pedal smoothly and avoid the dipping or bobbing on the dirt trail climbs. But, for the relatively easy trails I ride, the bike was waaaaaaay beyond overkill. I was able to keep the same course times on my cheapo 1985ish ParkPre Catalyst simply because of its lighter weight and the awesome Shimano BioPace chain-sprockets. The ParkPre has no suspension!

I sold the Joker because the trailing arms broke twice (this was before a redesign fix) and the bike was just more than I would ever need. But, since I will be sixty years old in a few months, my curent bicycle needs are not those of my long-past daredevil days.

I still ride the ParkPre on trails. It's been rebuilt twice now. For the road, I have my 2001 Bianchi Reparto Corse carbon and my original 1964 Steyr Clubman that's in the midst of a full restoration.

Most retailers will allow you to test ride various models on nearby trails. That may be your best method for making a decision.

___
 

DNW

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+1 on mtbr.com. You'll get a lot of good info there. As far as recommendations go:

1. Do get one with a front suspension (only). If you're an entry level rider, it'll be less jarring and just generally more comfortable.
2. Do get decent equipment, i.e. at least Shimano Deore or LX.
3. Do get disc brakes.
4. Make sure you get a good saddle. No one likes numbed nuts.
5. Change the tires to a cross-country type so that you don't waste so much energy on knobby tires just riding around on the street.
6. You can get clipless pedals if you wish, but make sure you get the shoe adapters for normal street riding.
7. Get a good repair kit.
8. Get a good helmet.
9. Make sure the bike is properly tuned by a bike shop if you don't know what you're doing.
10. Go out and have fun.
 

bmulford

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Originally Posted by Full Canvas
For what you stated, I agree with voxsartoria's remarks. Since Ellsworth's design offices are in my backyard, I was able to acquire a second-hand Joker mule (Ellsworth full suspension) in 2000. It took me a while to learn to pedal smoothly and avoid the dipping or bobbing on the dirt trail climbs. But, for the relatively easy trails I ride, the bike was waaaaaaay beyond overkill. I was able to keep the same course times on my cheapo 1985ish ParkPre Catalyst simply because of its lighter weight and the awesome Shimano BioPace chain-sprockets. The ParkPre has no suspension!

I sold the Joker because the trailing arms broke twice (this was before a redesign fix) and the bike was just more than I would ever need. But, since I will be sixty years old in a few months, my curent bicycle needs are not those of my long-past daredevil days.

I still ride the ParkPre on trails. It's been rebuilt twice now. For the road, I have my 2001 Bianchi Reparto Corse carbon and my original 1964 Steyr Clubman that's in the midst of a full restoration.

Most retailers will allow you to test ride various models on nearby trails. That may be your best method for making a decision.

___


On a side note, I have a 2001 Ellsworth Truth - setup for XC racing. The ride is so nice that in 8 years I've not found anything that appreciably improves upon it (e.g., titus, turner, litespeed, SC, etc).

I have a SC bullit for DH, but usually end up riding my specialized enduro pro for anything freeride or DH trails as its easier to control.

I started out with a hardtail trek for which I'm glad. It helped me get comfortable peddling in granny gears uphill with posture and technique. Something that is harder to learn when you have a soft tail.

MTBR.com is a fantastic resource - I've bought and sold on it before, and would recommend it for reviews and sales.
 

Piobaire

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+1 one on most advice here. As to pedals, get the Shimano that are clipless on one side, platform on the other, like the M324

 

Gus

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My suggestion is to go for a hard tail and go for something with "middle" Shimano parts (they have a starter line and a high performance line, the middle is excellent) for the best overall value and features. If it is a Specialized, that will be around $800. the last time I checked (Sept.)

Once you look around and get comfortable with brands and models, you might look on Craig's List for a used bikes. There are a lot of guys out there into quality bikes that buy them the way Style Forum members buy jackets. When these guys sell a bike it is usually loaded with features and at a huge savings.

I live next to a large open trail system and have been using my son's 9 year old $250 Schwinn for the last 3 years with good success. I bought newer tires and filled them with green slime (to prevent punctures) and it gets me around just fine. I would notice and appreciate better brakes and better shifting as found on the Specialized. But, I haven't been in any rush to make a change.

BTW, I have found biking to be a great addition to my workouts. I think intense cardio, as in biking, is the best way to burn fat and stay trim. And I because I love food I need all the help I can get!
 

voxsartoria

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Originally Posted by Full Canvas
For what you stated, I agree with voxsartoria's remarks. Since Ellsworth's design offices are in my backyard, I was able to acquire a second-hand Joker mule (Ellsworth full suspension) in 2000. It took me a while to learn to pedal smoothly and avoid the dipping or bobbing on the dirt trail climbs. But, for the relatively easy trails I ride, the bike was waaaaaaay beyond overkill. I was able to keep the same course times on my cheapo 1985ish ParkPre Catalyst simply because of its lighter weight and the awesome Shimano BioPace chain-sprockets. The ParkPre has no suspension!

I sold the Joker because the trailing arms broke twice (this was before a redesign fix) and the bike was just more than I would ever need. But, since I will be sixty years old in a few months, my curent bicycle needs are not those of my long-past daredevil days.

I still ride the ParkPre on trails. It's been rebuilt twice now. For the road, I have my 2001 Bianchi Reparto Corse carbon and my original 1964 Steyr Clubman that's in the midst of a full restoration.


I give you a
on every aspect of your story.

Originally Posted by bmulford
On a side note, I have a 2001 Ellsworth Truth - setup for XC racing. The ride is so nice that in 8 years I've not found anything that appreciably improves upon it (e.g., titus, turner, litespeed, SC, etc).

I have a SC bullit for DH, but usually end up riding my specialized enduro pro for anything freeride or DH trails as its easier to control.


Uhm, nice Ellsworth.

Post that pic again of you barrelling downhill...that's a good use of fully suspension...

- B
 

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