Motorcycles

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Tck13, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

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    ^ you have the makings of a pretty sweet bike there..
     


  2. MarkI

    MarkI Senior member

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    Alright, so coming in here as a total beginner. I'm interested in getting a bike, always have, this summer I will finally have the time/spare cash to go out and take lessons and hopefully get my license. I'm in NY if that counts for anything. I really don't know anything about bikes, what's a good place to go and learn, etc... For what it's worth I don't really like the looks of crotch rockets at all, I prefer bikes that look like this, what are they even called, cafe racers I believe http://www.turbobuick.com/forums/att...iw=963&bih=475 http://steelwhitetable.org/wp/wp-con...onda-cb550.jpg
     


  3. ClassyCanuck

    ClassyCanuck Senior member

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    Those are old Honda CB's. Great bikes.
    I would recommend taking an MSF course before anything else.
    Learn to ride properly an then look for a bike that suits your needs.
    If you get an older bike and being your first it can result in problems if you aren't too savvy with tools.
    Good luck.
     


  4. MarkI

    MarkI Senior member

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    Ive seen these MSF courses mentioned throughout the thread.

    Are you able to take these courses as an unlicensed rider, and then with the skills you learn you go and take the actual drivers test or what?
     


  5. MarkI

    MarkI Senior member

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    Oh wait, just read through it.

    I have to come there with a permit, which will be simple enough to aquire I hope.

    Then, if I take the course, which teaches me all the basics of motorcycle riding, and I pass, I get a waiver card for the New York State...

    You will receive a course completion card (which is sometimes referred to as a road test waiver card) after successfully completing the MSF Basic RiderCourse. This card, when presented with a valid NYS Driver License and Motorcycle Learner Permit at the DMV, will allow you to apply for a “Class M” Motorcycle License without taking the DMV motorcycle road test.

    This is great stuff.
     


  6. steviecakes

    steviecakes Senior member

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    Yeah, my friend took the MSF course last summer with no prior motorcycle experience. Just needed to show up wearing long sleeves and pants and a permit. They provided helmets, bikes. Day 1 is all lecture. Day 2 is all riding. Day 3 is more riding and then the test. Hopefully I'll be taking the course this summer. It's 3 days straight and each day is quite long. But it is going to be quite worth it in the end.
     


  7. MarkI

    MarkI Senior member

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    Been doing a lot of research, or maybe not enough as i'm asking this question.

    What would be a decent beginner bike, in the cafe racer sort of stylef, for around $1,500 - $2,000. Is this even realistic?
     


  8. KnowYourRights

    KnowYourRights Senior member

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    Been doing a lot of research, or maybe not enough as i'm asking this question. What would be a decent beginner bike, in the cafe racer sort of stylef, for around $1,500 - $2,000. Is this even realistic?
    New-ish? Or vintage (pre-1980)? A cafe racer, in the strictest of terms, must be British. But most sensible people (myself included) agree that pre-1980 bikes NOT of American pedigree are prime candidates for a cafe. A vintage Japanese bike has been, traditionally, a less expensive alternative to a Brit or Italian bike. But prices have been spiking lately. I believe it's a bubble and the prices won't hold long-term, but I'm a Brit fan, so what do I know? To answer your question, I'd opt for a '73 or earlier CB350 twin if you're looking for a city bike and you don't weigh more than 150 pounds. The little CBs are super fun, light, and not intimidating to new rider. They are air-cooled twins, so maintenance is fairly easy. But please, don't pay a penny more than, say, $1,200 for a CB350. And if you do pay that much, make sure it's in near perfect running order. Otherwise, I'd suggest looking for a CB550 or a Yamaha XS650. The latter is an air-cooled twin with a plentiful parts supply. The former is much, much better than its pig of a sibling, the CB750. The 550 is lighter and better handling. It's a 4-cylinder bike, so maintenance gets a bit trickier than the twins, but it's not that bad. If you're mechanically inclined, you can find a rough '70s Triumph for $2,000. You'll have to get your hands dirty, but you'll have a bike that will only appreciate in value. '70s Triumphs (T140, TR7) are 750cc air-cooled twins. Easy to work on. Parts are plentiful. These bikes are more than capable of keeping up with modern traffic. I can't really speak to the new-ish bikes. Maybe an old Ducati Monster or Suzuki SV650? Not cafe bikes by any stretch, but they might be close to what you're looking for. Good luck! A motorcycle will change your life. And remember, you don't have to limit yourself to one bike. Best to aim for three...yeah, that's a good number. [​IMG] Maybe four...
     


  9. emptym

    emptym Moderator Moderator

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    [​IMG]

    Kawasaki Vulcan 750, first time out in two months because the snow has finally disappeared. Yay.


    Having no time to work on her is a shame.

    [​IMG]


    Nice pics.
     


  10. Jbreen1

    Jbreen1 Senior member

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    Got a bike starting problem. I have a 2010 BMW 1200 GS. It has about 3k miles. It sat for about 6 months without the proper winter prep. Wasn't my intentions but there were circumstances that prevented me from getting to the bike and winterizing. So there was no battery tender hooked up or stabil in the tank.

    The battery was obviously dead so I hooked it up to a trickle charger. Light was green but the battery was measuring at about 11.5 volts. I would just get a clicking sound when trying to turn it over. So I tried jumping it with a car battery and it was trying to turn over but it sounded like it didn't have enough power to do it. I would think that there shouldn't be any problems turning over with a car battery. Only thing I could think of is that there was a bad connection somehow.

    My plan is to get a new battery and give that a go. Anybody have any suggestions on what else it could be?
     


  11. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

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    Got a bike starting problem. I have a 2010 BMW 1200 GS. It has about 3k miles. It sat for about 6 months without the proper winter prep. Wasn't my intentions but there were circumstances that prevented me from getting to the bike and winterizing. So there was no battery tender hooked up or stabil in the tank.

    The battery was obviously dead so I hooked it up to a trickle charger. Light was green but the battery was measuring at about 11.5 volts. I would just get a clicking sound when trying to turn it over. So I tried jumping it with a car battery and it was trying to turn over but it sounded like it didn't have enough power to do it. I would think that there shouldn't be any problems turning over with a car battery. Only thing I could think of is that there was a bad connection somehow.

    My plan is to get a new battery and give that a go. Anybody have any suggestions on what else it could be?


    Will the battery run your lights and other electronics? Pull the battery and take it to a garage and have them load test it, that'll tell you if you need a new battery.
     


  12. Jbreen1

    Jbreen1 Senior member

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    Will the battery run your lights and other electronics? Pull the battery and take it to a garage and have them load test it, that'll tell you if you need a new battery.

    Yea the lights, computer, and gps turned on.
     


  13. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

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    Yea the lights, computer, and gps turned on.

    Could still be the battery, may not be holding enough of a charge to turn your starter. I'd take it in and have it tested. Dumb question, but you don't have your kill switch turned to off do you?
     


  14. Jbreen1

    Jbreen1 Senior member

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    Could still be the battery, may not be holding enough of a charge to turn your starter. I'd take it in and have it tested. Dumb question, but you don't have your kill switch turned to off do you?

    Not a dumb question at all. But yea I checked that.
     


  15. Kookz

    Kookz Senior member

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    Got a bike starting problem. I have a 2010 BMW 1200 GS. It has about 3k miles. It sat for about 6 months without the proper winter prep. Wasn't my intentions but there were circumstances that prevented me from getting to the bike and winterizing. So there was no battery tender hooked up or stabil in the tank.

    The battery was obviously dead so I hooked it up to a trickle charger. Light was green but the battery was measuring at about 11.5 volts. I would just get a clicking sound when trying to turn it over. So I tried jumping it with a car battery and it was trying to turn over but it sounded like it didn't have enough power to do it. I would think that there shouldn't be any problems turning over with a car battery. Only thing I could think of is that there was a bad connection somehow.

    My plan is to get a new battery and give that a go. Anybody have any suggestions on what else it could be?


    Haha, I feel like this could have been written by me, except I have an 05 GS that had the same problems. Parked it in October, tried to start it in March. The jump worked though, and my friend rode it around for me after I left NY.
     


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