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Motorcycles

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Tck13, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. Rumpelstiltskin

    Rumpelstiltskin Senior member

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    New male riders love to tell themselves (and anyone who can listen) that they will control themselves and will respect the power., The simple fact of the matter is that riders who start out on small bikes and gradually move up the ladder (or even stay on their smaller displacement bikes) end up being better riders than those riders that start out on larger displacement bikes. How can you master learning to ride when the vehicle scares you half to death? You can't.

    I remember coming across a guy who said he used to ride and his first bike was a CBR1000 because his buddies said anything smaller was for girls. The guy proudly told me he had never even hit 6th gear because he was too frightened. What happened to the bike? He crashed it of course.

    Another guy I know had ridden a 125cc scooter for 2 years or so but after seeing people like me riding decided to get a bike. I tried to help him out but he kept getting advice from scores of well meaning idiots. gsxr750 is a good beginner bike. Anything under 1000 cc is for girls, etc. The guy ended up getting a Hyabusa and I just prayed I wouldn't have to attend his funeral. Luckily his 2 crashes were minor and he has since sworn off riding forever.
     


  2. Rumpelstiltskin

    Rumpelstiltskin Senior member

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    have your brake pads checked out and replace them if necessary. They should provide you with enough feedback that you can feel an impending lockup. Have them check and/or replace your brake lines as well.
     


  3. SplasH

    SplasH Active Member

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    Hi guys, after joining the forum I thought i'd start with this thread, being a motorcycle fan and rider for the past 16 years or so...

    I had an old yamaha DTR 50 to go to school but i quickly moved on to a 125cc Aprilia RS with a tetsuya harada replica paint. A true beauty of style and engineering at the time... Sorry i don't have pictures of mine, my camera wasn't digital at that time :)

    [​IMG]

    After keeping this one for 3 years, i had to sell it to buy a car (true mistake, they're worth a fortune now...).

    Anyway i then got my "big bikes" license and moved on to a Ducati 750 SSie, again, a very good bike, that lacked in power what it had in style.

    [​IMG]

    I have to mention that even though it was a ducati, i never had a single problem with it. It ran beautiffuly even with 20 000 miles on it. After a friend totalled it on a test ride, I moved on to a "cheap and easy to maintain" bikes. Starting with a Yamaha 600 Genesis FZR (1991), which is the bike i would recommand to any person starting with sports bikes. It's cheap, it runs fast, and it's not that outdated when nicely serviced.

    [​IMG]

    After the FZR i had a Kawasaki ZX6R Ninja from 1996, which was really fun to drive. So fun in fact that i had to buy a second one for track use only :) I don't know what it is that makes kawasaki bikes such a thrill to drive, but it is real.

    Here's the road one
    [​IMG]


    And finally after riding it as an everyday transportation in Paris till it broke (litterally... frames from that period were not that well made and cracked), I am now the proud owner of a Honda RC51 SP1 from 2001 that I only use for trackdays and short rides in the countryside. This is the bike that really made me fell in love with bikes in 2001 when i was watching colin edwards race for the world championship. I'm really happy to have the chance to own one.


    [​IMG]


    So yeah, a lot of sports bike, but that's the only kind i'm really confortable with.


    And to help with the topic, in the checking the brake routine, you can also change your brake fluid, obviously goes with replacing the brake lines, but if the lines dont get any compression from braking, just a fluid change can do wonders. And you shouldn't slide when braking in front, unless it's very slippery on the ground. Engage the brakes by pressing lightly, then harder will ensure you you'll almost never lock the front wheel or go over the bike. Bikes are made to get a 80 front /20 rear brake repartition, so not using the front is complete nonsense.

    Thanks for reading and sorry for the long post.
     


  4. MarioImpemba

    MarioImpemba Senior member

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    Great story and great bikes.

    What's required to get on a track?
     


  5. SplasH

    SplasH Active Member

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    Not much.

    Either you have a licence to ride from the motorcycle federation and you can ride any bike, or you have a road bike and the license that goes with it. Aside of that, tracks require that you wear protections like a one piece leather suit, helmet (duh), gloves, boots and that your bike is equipped with the minimum safety features like a chain guard, a system to catch the oil when you fall so that you don't spoil the track for everybody else.

    That's for open days, if you want to seriously race, each series has its own set of rules but aside of driver protection, it's mainly bike equipments that are specific to a race series. Like modifications you're allowed to make or not and so on.
     


  6. Rumpelstiltskin

    Rumpelstiltskin Senior member

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    tape on glass parts, water or water wetter instead of antifreeze, safety wire bolts that release fluids like the oil drain plug i believe
     


  7. MarioImpemba

    MarioImpemba Senior member

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  8. SplasH

    SplasH Active Member

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    Very badly.

    I would never wear a suit that crashed. Not for racing purpose at least. Even though it can only have a minor scratch, the stiching took a hit too, and you never know how/when it's gonna wear. Aside of that, on a vintage suit, it's gonna be a pain to fin suitable protection to replace those who took the fall (if there is any, not sure from the pictures...). It doesn't seem to have a back pocket either... To finish, cow leather isn't the best around when it comes to protection gear, kangaroo is much more resistant. 300$ + shipping is also a lot when all you get is a worn out leather pants and jacket... For a not so vintage option you can get this kind of things : http://www.ebay.com/itm/Retro-Vinta...t-SUIT-/300816033911?var=&hash=item460a086877 but that's almost as good as it gets for a cheap suit. If you want serious protection, it's gonna be more around 500$, if you're only concerned about the style, yeah, go cheap but i would never recommand being cheap when it comes to protection gear :)

    As for going on a track with a car, not living in the US i wouldn't know what the rules and regulations are over there. Here you can call the local track and ask when they have an open day you can come in with a road car and all you need then is an insurance and a driving license.
     


  9. Rumpelstiltskin

    Rumpelstiltskin Senior member

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    Dunno about buying an old suit for trackwear. Besides some tracks do not allow 2 piece suits. Now I have an all black Teknic Chicane 1 piece suit that has never been down with virginal knee pucks. It has been sitting in the closet untouched for the last 3 years and I'm not sure I will ever fit it again *rubs belly* Interested?
     


  10. Tck13

    Tck13 Senior member

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    "Radical"? "Misreading"? Not at all. You don't have any nuance to your claims which strikes me as odd. Perhaps you're a highly skilled rider with a lot of training? But at this point I'm willing to bet that A) you don't own a bike and B) you don't have or have very little "training" at riding a bike. amirite? Not that not owning or having little experience is a bad thing at all, it's not. But preaching is just that; preaching.


    No disagreement regarding no training but you can choose a bike larger than a 750cc and do just fine.

    I never said anyone should start riding with no training on a poorly chosen bike. I think every person should have training, especially formal training before riding a bike.

    However, I don't believe for a second that everyone should be forced to get training (or, maybe they should have at least an MSF course) or to buy a 750cc or less just because you think / others think that they can't either handle the size of the bike or the power. Believe it or not, they can. Do I recommend it? Not always, but it certainly can and does happen and buying a 1300cc as my first official bike (I had a YZF-R1 first - long story) worked out great for me. As a matter of fact, the power of that bike was PERFECT for me as was the size of the bike. It fit like a glove. Plus, I bought it knowing that it was probably going to get dropped at some point and was going to get scratched up, it was going to get used and abused, etc. I didn't waste several hundred or thousand dollars on a bike I wasn't going to ride the hell out of and fully enjoy.


    You're right, I don't agree. Why? While I'm of basically the same mindset regarding doing something completely and learning as much as one can about it, who the fuck are you to tell everyone what they should do and what they're interest or skill level should be to operate a motorcycle, play the guitar, drums, operate a computer, etc. Are you the skill police? Did you ever hear Ringo Starr play the drums for one of the biggest bands of all time? Perhaps you would have banned him from the group? Do you think that Larry Mullen Junior is a virtuoso? Are you going to go to the Harley Dealership and tell them that they can't sell a Fatboy to someone because they don't think they have enough experience to ride it? Sometimes stupid people do stupid things. Natural selection happens unfortunately.


    Absolutely, and I am an experienced rider having ridden for several years riding all year round (unless below freezing) putting 7k - 8k miles a year on my bike. Of course, I didn't even consider buying a bike until I took the MSF training course (twice) and purchasing gear (which evolved over time - as did my riding style). As my first instructor / mentor pointed out, "this class just gives you enough skill to go to the parking lot and practice". He was very right and that's just what I did. It took a couple of months before I felt ready to even go on an hour ride on the highway to where I worked at the time. And then I spent hours picking up my bike, doing slow speed drills / turns / braking, reading books and watching videos about the topic, etc. Not that I'm a superstar rider, I only have 3-5 years of total experience but I think I've done more than ok. I would've been bored with a small bike in about 6 months.


    :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2013


  11. SplasH

    SplasH Active Member

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    Being bored with a small bike doesn't mean being able to drive a big one... The new Kawasaki 300 ninja is in my opinion the best beginner bike there is today.

    Starting with 100+ hp, or even almost 200 on a R-1, on a first bike is complete nonsense. Surviving the first year means either you're only using half of it, rendering it totally useless compared to a cheaper R6 if we stay in sports yamaha, or you're just very lucky.

    Everybody can get lucky and survive a few years without a scratch, that doesn't makes it ok to say that anybody can go on and start with a superbike. Telling somebody to go with something according to their skill is just common sense especially when deadly crashes are involved.
     


  12. Cool The Kid

    Cool The Kid Senior member

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    Starting on anything but a <500cc is not a good idea, no matter how well you "survive" it. Telling folks 'hey I started on an R1, I survived, you might survive too' is the height of irresponsibility & bad advice, no matter how much you try to rationalize it. Riding is dangerous enough, no need to worsen the odds with bad advice
     


  13. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Senior member

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  14. epb

    epb Senior member

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    nvm
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2013


  15. epb

    epb Senior member

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    Nice write-up! Is the Nuovo a motorcycle or a scooter - from the pics, it looks like you guys have a mix of both...
     


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