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Motorcycles

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Tck13, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. Pennglock

    Pennglock Senior member

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    That Rideapart blog is very well done. Are there others out there of similar quality?
     
  2. Rumpelstiltskin

    Rumpelstiltskin Senior member

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    Last edited: Jul 19, 2013
  3. epb

    epb Senior member

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    I'm also curious about these - the information on sizing is amazingly vague, so I'm reluctant to order a pair without some input from actual owners.
     
  4. BostonHedonist

    BostonHedonist Senior member

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    I want to take a poll. How many CCs were everyone's first bikes?

    I started on an 800cc Triumph, which I probably wouldn't recommend due to a slower learning curve that comes with a larger machine. But I did my time in parking lots, took it very slow and was ultimately happy with not having to upgrade right away.
     
  5. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Senior member

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    As a kid: 70

    25 years later as an adult: 1000
     
  6. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I asked about these on SF a couple years back. They seem like pretty nice pants, although I was researching them again a month or two ago. Looks like everyone is now selling the "City Pant 3" and the consensus seems to be that quality fell down from the earlier version.
     
  7. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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  8. TRINI

    TRINI Senior member

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    185cc scooter ---> 865cc motorcycle.

    Also, today was day one of airbox removal. MOTHERFUCK stripped screws. I had at least 2 today. I got as far as disconnecting the airbox from the bike. I just need to physically get it out. I'm probably gonna cut it into pieces because I don't think removing the rear tire is something I'm up for.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013
  9. epb

    epb Senior member

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    Mine was 400cc. I wanted a CB175 back when I started, but I was forced into a larger bike because my uncle (who was teaching me to ride) believed anything less that 750cc would get you run over. A common sentiment in America during the 1970s - big engines saved lives! I only got a smaller bike because none of them were willing to pay the cost difference for a larger one, but I was moved up because I stupidly told them how much money I actually had, so I was pushed into the largest displacement I could afford. Another sign of the times: all the safety talk was limited to displacement - none of the adults involved cared if I got a helmet, gloves, boots, or motorcycle jacket. :facepalm:
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2013
  10. Cool The Kid

    Cool The Kid Senior member

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    People need to specify what kind of bike it was too. 600ccs can be anywhere from 40 to 100HP

    I started on a Ninja 650R (649ccs, ~70HP). I would put it just on the outskirts of good to start on. ~2 years in I love it and don't want too much more for the street. First 6 months I was overwhelmed though to be fair I did learn to ride in NYC. Out in regular country you might be able to get away with it.
     
  11. EgliComet

    EgliComet Senior member

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    Firt street bike was an RZ350 at age 16. It belonged to a friend's girlfriend that shot herself and sat for a year or two unused. I pushed it home and told my mother that I was storing it for my friend. It's truly amazing I'm still alive.
    First bike ever was a late 1970s Yamaha PW80 that I terrorized my neighborhood from age 10 until 13 when I finally blew it up.
    After that it was about a dozen BMW Airheads, a 900SS white frame, a few oilheads and a whole bunch of other stuff.
     
  12. MarioImpemba

    MarioImpemba Senior member

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    CC's alone is not a great qualifier.

    As stated numerous times, my first bike is a 1203cc Buell. It revs to 6500 RPM, free-revs slowly, and has a linear powerband. You'd have to be a real twat to fuck-up on it. I am far from a good rider, and I'm a pretty shitty driver.

    I laid-down my buddy's 600cc R6 when I was 18.

    That thing revved about 100x quicker than my antiquated Harley motor and makes nearly 30hp more.

    ...with HALF the cc's.

    I've also putted around on my Dad's R75/6. Try to tell me that 50hp 750cc is too much for a beginner. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2013
  13. epb

    epb Senior member

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    Yeah, I'd say that 50hp is too much even in some slow-revving cruiser or tourer, and while different engines make different outputs, a limit like Europe's 125cc for the first year puts every beginner in a pretty safe margin as far as power/performance. America has a bad habit of focusing on the exception when it comes to safety - if a few people survive learning on liter-bikes, eh, good enough. And so you get stories like:

    http://now.msn.com/barry-strang-wyoming-man-killed-three-miles-into-first-motorcycle-ride

    as well as pretty much anyone that's ever worked a bike dealership having tales of people with permits buying too much bike and crashing/dropping it before they get off the lot.

    The bottom line is that starting with a small-displacement bike is ALWAYS a good idea. That some people can survive learning on larger-displacement bikes doesn't invalidate the soundness of the principle, and often generates cases that reinforce it. Rather than loophole-ook and nitpick, we should be encouraging the best practice. But noooo...
     
  14. EgliComet

    EgliComet Senior member

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  15. otc

    otc Senior member

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    400cc 1979 kz400.

    But honestly, either they were really pushing hard on the economy bike angle, or there is something wrong with my bike (entirely likely there is something eating away the power considering its age). A ninja 250 is probably much faster and more powerful...it honestly doesn't feel any stronger than the 250 nighthawks and the 225 dual-sports I took my MSF course with, although I never tried to push them hard.

    It has served me well in the city and on lake shore drive...but I get a little nervous the handful of times I have taken it on the interstate....it seems to go 80 without complaints (although I worry about a 30 year old engine spinning so fast for long period), but once you are going ~70, it runs out of acceleration power for passing.
     

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