Motorcycles

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Tck13, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. John Doe

    John Doe Senior member

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    This type of bike is not my cup of tea however it gets good reviews and it seems like a good bike for what you want. I think it has plenty of power and would be more than adequate for longer trips. I also think it would make a good beginner bike i.e. manageable power, low center of gravity, not too small of an engine that you'll be wanting to upgrade later. It looks like it has after market pipes which look cool and 14,000 miles is really not that much. I say go check it out. Plus it has a cup holder.:embar:
     
  2. Texastyle

    Texastyle Senior member

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    Thanks! I definitely agree that the aesthetics aren't the greatest, but I agree that it would probably something reasonable to start out on. I sent the owner a message on craiglist so I'm just waiting to hear back.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2012
  3. Greg-NWO

    Greg-NWO New Member

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    Hello all fellow stylish motorcycle lovers :)

    Just joined and saw the thread so here's my scoot. It's an 09 Monster 696. Not the best pic but I spend more time riding it than photographing it!

    [​IMG]
     
  4. John Doe

    John Doe Senior member

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    Welcome fellow Ducatista, cool bike. I had a '07 S2R 1000 Monster before I got my current ride, a MTS 1200.
     
  5. Texastyle

    Texastyle Senior member

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    I went and saw the bike and it looked great. It has a slight ding in the tank, but I'm hoping that it can be pulled out. I put some money down on it and I'm picking it up next week.


    One quick question for you guys is if there are any reasonably priced (250 or below) jackets that are at least moderately stylish? I'd like to find something that can offer protection but not make me look too ridiculous. I wish I was cool enough to pull off the Easy Rider style jacket but I'd feel a little silly riding a foreign bike with a big American flag on my back... but I might do it anyway.

    [​IMG]


    Edit: I found a great Schott jacket on Ebay for 180 and I think I'm going to pull the trigger on it.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2012
  6. cahlersmeyer

    cahlersmeyer Senior member

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    IMO, and my experience, you'd be better served will a smaller-ish bike.
    Suzuki makes the "Savage" aka S40. Its a 600cc bike, which is great around town, and plenty for the highway (if you're doing the limit ;) ) My dad had one that I rode around on for awhile. I'm thinking about getting one when I get back from my deployment and building a cafe racer from the RYCA kit.

    Next fall, dump it and get a vintage Asian bike and rebuild it. You can work on it during the non-riding months and really learn a lot about bikes. I'm rebuilding a '68 Honda CB450 as we speak. It's more of a bratstyle than a cafe racer. Check out Pipe Burn or Bike Exif for inspiration!
     
  7. cahlersmeyer

    cahlersmeyer Senior member

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  8. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Senior member

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    It's all a matter of opinion but I disagree and disagree. If one has adequate physical strength and maturity then starting out with a larger bike is better than starting out with a small bike. Power is what it is all about and that V twin is not a power monster as is. As for working on bikes, most people prefer riding to wrenching.
     
  9. bubbleboys

    bubbleboys Senior member

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    As always, maturity does NOT equal skill/experience

    RIding a motorcycle safely requires both maturity AND skill/experience.

    Larger CC bikes require more skill/experience to safely handle because the margin for error is much smaller.
    The bikes are generally heavier and thus harder to handle,
    The greater power means that that it is that much easier to give too much throttle be it in a corner or even straight up and down.

    For instance, a new rider can be as mature as they want, but does that mean they have the skill/experience to know what to do if they lose the rear wheel?
    Chances are, they might just chop the throttle and thus high-side the bike when what they really should be doing is just staying on the throttle and riding it out.
    What if they lose the front end because they go into a bumpy corner and they lose traction on the front. Do they even know they should get on the throttle more? Do they even have the instant reaction to know how to react appropriately let alone recognize that they're losing the front end as opposed to the rear? I certainly am not 100% sure of my ability to differentiate losing the front and rear and I've been riding for 5-6 years.

    I could fill a book with all the little things that you learn riding a motorcycle and I'm still relatively inexperienced compared to some of the guys who have been riding longer and had more seat time than me, both on road bikes and dirt bikes.

    So long story short, maturity =/= skill/experience.
     
  10. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Senior member

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    Did I write that maturity equals skill/experience? No.

    Did I write that safe riding does not require both maturity and skill/experience? No.

    Did I write that larger bikes do not require more skill/experience to safely handle? No.

    Same with the rest of your stuff.
     
  11. Vaio

    Vaio Senior member

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  12. bubbleboys

    bubbleboys Senior member

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    Fine, "adequate physical strength" is not a replacement for skill/experience.
    I would think that would be obvious to even a mentally challenged individual :rolleyes:


    Start on a 250, you can generally sell it back for roughly what you paid for it, unless you overpaid in the first place
     
  13. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Senior member

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    I didn't write that either. Reading comprehension is not your strong suit.
     
  14. Texastyle

    Texastyle Senior member

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    I was just about to buy that Vulcan and ended up finding a much nicer Honda Shadow for slightly more money. It's a 750 cc so it's not a huge bike, but it's big enough for what I need.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2012
  15. bubbleboys

    bubbleboys Senior member

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    No, apparently logical reasoning isn't your's.


    To you, adequate physical strength + maturity = okay to ride a 600cc, 1000cc, or let's take it to the logical conclusion of a 1400cc bike
    To me, skill/experience + maturity = okay to ride a 600cc, 1000cc, or let's take it to the logical conclusion of a 1400cc bike

    Do you need to retake basic high school algebra or are you able to figure out what I mean when I say "adequate physical strength" is not equal to skill/experience. :rolleyes:
     

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