Motorcycles

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Tck13, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. 6up

    6up Senior member

    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    4
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2011
    Location:
    Toronto
    I wouldnt pick up a cafe racer / older bike, unless you plan to get the hands dirty. The last thing you want is a bike that is sitting in the garage vs being ridden. You'd want something that is a little more modern, relatively light weight and reliable so that it doesnt leave you stranded.
     


  2. TRINI

    TRINI Senior member

    Messages:
    9,027
    Likes Received:
    650
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    
    That's definitely one of my main concerns as I'm not mechanically inclined. I'm also considering scooters as well since I'll be doing mostly city riding.
     


  3. foulard

    foulard Senior member

    Messages:
    207
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    May 24, 2010
    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    you're right of course. I've got a few vespas. The one I rely on to get to me around the city to work everyday is brand new. I dont have to light a candle and pray before I try to start it.

    That's exactly why I'm now interested in the antique BMW in the photo. Just to have it for an every now and then ride. What do you think of it?
     


  4. otc

    otc Senior member

    Messages:
    14,536
    Likes Received:
    4,153
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    
    This is where I am at now.

    I park on the street and don't have a garage to do work. I bought a bike that is easy to work on...but that doesn't mean it is easy or comfortable to work on on the street corner :(

    Hopefully the hand surgeon gives me the all clear today on my bicycle accident injuries so I can squeeze in some more riding before it gets cold--but I need to pull apart my carbs for cleaning which requires moving the seat/tank/airbox in the middle of the street and therefore I keep putting it off (well that, and the fact that having never played with carbs before, I'm not in a hurry to potentially make my bike non-functional). I hope doing so solves my backfiring problem and makes the motor start easier when its below 75 degrees outside...

    I'm not ready to buy a bigger bike quite yet, but for the next bike I wouldn't mind something newer (fuel-injected even) that's not going to trouble me much with mechanical issues since it is my only means of motorized transport short of renting a zipcar.
     


  5. KnowYourRights

    KnowYourRights Senior member

    Messages:
    371
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    

    Bikes I've owned that left me stranded:
    '98 FZR600 - water pump
    '99 CBR900 - dead battery

    Bikes I've owned that have never left me stranded:
    '79 Triumph Bonneville
    '71 Triumph Daytona (it threw a pushrod and still got me home on one cylinder)
    '64 Norton N15CS

    The beauty of old bikes is that you HAVE to wrench on them. That way, you keep them in good running order. And they don't leave you stranded. If they do have a hiccup on the road, you know what it is and how to fix it.

    Unless you buy a brand-new bike form the showroom, you're going to have to get your hands dirty. Even the new bike will get old. It's a machine. Parts wear out.

    Buying a brand-new bike every few years may be a solution.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2011


  6. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

    Messages:
    9,480
    Likes Received:
    1,450
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2006
    Location:
    Not in Atlanta, GA
    

    As much as it pains me, this is how I roll.. I just don't have the time to be wrenching, and I like to spend my spare hours riding.. I keep my bikes for 2 to 3 years and then move on.. Maximizes my time in the seat and minimizes my time doing something I have no comparative advantage in doing..

    Trini, stick with a newer bike, at least until you've been riding a couple of years and feel like working on your own bikes gives you enjoyment..
     


  7. KnowYourRights

    KnowYourRights Senior member

    Messages:
    371
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2009
    No harm in that, Gnatty. My point, really, was that a '98 Ducati or CBR is still going to need at least basic maintenance. And old bikes don't need shims and injectors and specialty tools. Just wrenches and a manual.

    I didn't know shit about bikes when I got my Bonnie. I was a car guy. I knew how to turn a wrench and read a shop manual. So when the Bonnie clutch was sticking, I opened to that chapter and dug in. Screwed it up the first two tries, then nailed it. Now I can rebuild a unit Triumph clutch faster than I could take fairings off my CBR.

    Trini, don't be put off. If you want an old bike, get one. Get a good runner and learn as things need attention. With old bikes (and cars) everything is right there. Ease of maintenance is literally built into the design of the machine (unlike the new Mercedes that doesn't even have a dipstick).

    Plus, you literally have a huge network of other vintage owners ready to give you free advice on every last nut and bolt on your machine.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2011


  8. otc

    otc Senior member

    Messages:
    14,536
    Likes Received:
    4,153
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    taking out my carbs for the first time...wish me luck!
     


  9. dron

    dron Senior member

    Messages:
    199
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    Location:
    copenhagen
    good luck.
    I don't find it all that complicated actually. What are you doing to them?
     




  10. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

    Messages:
    10,301
    Likes Received:
    4,484
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Location:
    The Old North State
    I hope this is the right thread for this. I just purchased my first bike. I road when I was a teenager, but it has been a few years.

    Anyway, I need to get a jacket, boots, gloves, helmet, pants, etc. Any website you guys recommend? I've been looking at leatherup and a couple other sites. Any brands you'd recommend or recommend avoiding? I really like the look of the Speed & Strength Twist of Fate and Under the Radar. They have them in both leather and textile. I really don't want to spend $500 on a jacket alone though. The textiles are better at $180, but is the protection that much worse? What makes Speed & Strength stuff so expensive, is it a brand name thing or are they legitimately a lot better quality than the $2-300 leather jackets?

    Thanks for the help.
     


  11. otc

    otc Senior member

    Messages:
    14,536
    Likes Received:
    4,153
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    
    cleaning them and making sure everything is working right inside. I was worried about it for no real reason so I kept putting it off. They actually came off super easy but I have not taken them apart the rest of the way yet. I don't know what a dirty carb looks like but these look very clean--I have a rebuild kit that came with the bike but I don't think there is any reason to use it now from what I can see.



    I'm probably not the person to ask about this (as I am equally new) but there is a seller on ebay who has the Belstaff Zodiac listed for $49.99 ($90 less than retail on britishmotorcyclegear.com). It seems nice enough and came with shoulder and elbow armor. It is a summer jacket alternative to mesh but I really feel like it does quite well in cooler weather with the vents closed and an extra layer. The ebay listing says it comes with back armor but BMG claims that that pad is just a filler to make sure the armor slot is sewn large enougn and *not* actual armor.
    They didn't have the size I wanted listed but they were an actual store out on the west coast and were willing to take my order over the phone and ship it to me (and charged me actual shipping instead of the inflated $20 ebay shipping).
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2011


  12. otc

    otc Senior member

    Messages:
    14,536
    Likes Received:
    4,153
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2008
    Carbs look pretty damn clean....but the diaphragms (they are CV carbs) on both are torn. One is pretty bad and the other one might accept a glue repair...but I'll probably just shell out for two new ones (though these fuckers seem rare).

    The benefit of this is that people online are claiming that with these torn (not sure if they are talking about 1 or both diaphragms) , the bike will only make 70-75% of max speed....this should help clear up my disappointment with the low top speed :) :)
     


  13. hrb

    hrb Senior member

    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    6
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2009
    anyone replaced a bulb on an 68-80 honda CB (the unit appears to be completely sealed and am wondering if it is meant to be broken)? I appreciate there are other forums that are more suited to this, but thought i would check here as I do not belong to any others.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2011


  14. seanrye

    seanrye Active Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    May 2, 2007
    My Triumph


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2011


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by