Motorcycles

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Tck13, Mar 15, 2006.

  1. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

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    where do you keep all these bikes, gnatty? [​IMG]

    And I think the rough French Canuckistan translation for too many is "de trop" [​IMG]


    [​IMG] We don't park in the garage anymore..
     


  2. KnowYourRights

    KnowYourRights Senior member

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    On the other hand, I have tracked down a 1960, restored to museum quality. Looks like it rolled off the showroom floor last week.

    Wow! I don't even want to know how much he's asking...
     


  3. MarkI

    MarkI Senior member

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    In your guys opinion would these Triumphs make for good beginner bikes?

    I'm deciding between one of these, and a 70s CB350...?
     


  4. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

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    In your guys opinion would these Triumphs make for good beginner bikes?

    I'm deciding between one of these, and a 70s CB350...?


    How mechanically inclined are you? Note that many of the older bikes will have drum brakes, and will not match the stopping power of a modern setup. Something to think about if you are a beginning rider. They are nice and light and very agile, so from that perspective, a good fit.
     


  5. MarkI

    MarkI Senior member

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    How mechanically inclined are you? Note that many of the older bikes will have drum brakes, and will not match the stopping power of a modern setup. Something to think about if you are a beginning rider. They are nice and light and very agile, so from that perspective, a good fit.

    I've never really worked on mechanics, but I am good with my hands, and in the little that I have done i've been ok.

    I'm sure with proper directions, tools and parts I will be able to take care of things myself.
     


  6. otc

    otc Senior member

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    How mechanically inclined are you? Note that many of the older bikes will have drum brakes, and will not match the stopping power of a modern setup. Something to think about if you are a beginning rider. They are nice and light and very agile, so from that perspective, a good fit.

    Most of the 70s CBs I have looked at have a front disk and a rear drum...is this good enough?
    What would be a similar triumph or norton or other japanese one (2-400cc range probably)?
     


  7. dizzhizz

    dizzhizz Senior member

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    honda cb400ss and yamaha sr400 would be a good start if you can find them outside Japan.
     


  8. bigbjorn

    bigbjorn Senior member

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    In your guys opinion would these Triumphs make for good beginner bikes?
    Am going to go out on a sturdy limb and say no. I've owned a number of wacky motorcycles, and wrench on all my own equipment, and there's nothing particularly challenging about British bikes of the 60s era, but they require vastly more fiddling than modern bikes, the carbs like to go out of adjustment, and the electronics (though, contrary to rumours, were ok from the factory) can be fairly dodgy now. And it all depends on current state, right? Top end done? New crank bearings journal bearings etc.?

    very agile
    Compared to a mid-eighties Gold Wing or a ZG1000 Connie with a blown fork, sure. Compared to a modern 600, it's like they're hinged in the middle and use bedsprings for suspension. Not to mention the Barney Rubble braking. I'm still in the hunt for a 1964 Tiger, but as someone who rides 365 days per yes I'd _never_ recommend a Trump as an only or beginner bike. MarkI - just get a 1993 Suzuki GS500 like everyone else. Ride it for a year, drop it a few times, and then sell it on. If you must have a "styleforum" bike, maybe a Kwak W650.
     


  9. CDFS

    CDFS Senior member

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    I'm seriously thinking of buying a Honda VFR750 '89 or so. Supposedly a good reliable allround bike suitable for the taller owner. Anyone with experience with them?

    Am going to go out on a sturdy limb and say no. I've owned a number of wacky motorcycles, and wrench on all my own equipment, and there's nothing particularly challenging about British bikes of the 60s era, but they require vastly more fiddling than modern bikes, the carbs like to go out of adjustment, and the electronics (though, contrary to rumours, were ok from the factory) can be fairly dodgy now. And it all depends on current state, right? Top end done? New crank bearings journal bearings etc.?

    Compared to a mid-eighties Gold Wing or a ZG1000 Connie with a blown fork, sure. Compared to a modern 600, it's like they're hinged in the middle and use bedsprings for suspension. Not to mention the Barney Rubble braking. I'm still in the hunt for a 1964 Tiger, but as someone who rides 365 days per yes I'd _never_ recommend a Trump as an only or beginner bike. MarkI - just get a 1993 Suzuki GS500 like everyone else. Ride it for a year, drop it a few times, and then sell it on. If you must have a "styleforum" bike, maybe a Kwak W650.


    But if you buy used; don't, for whatever reason, check how many previous owners it has had.






    [​IMG]
     


  10. bigbjorn

    bigbjorn Senior member

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    That's a pretty old "gentleman's sports" bike. With any bike like that, I'd be buying the previous owner, not the bike. My pops has a 1987 Hurricane 1000, and I'd buy that one, because he can account for every oil change and mile since new. But a dodgy Viffer with F1 pipes I'd run run run away from. Viffers are sort of a pain to work on too - tight clearances, fiddly between the banks carbs. But that gear-drive cam noise is sweet.

    Why not get a Gen 5? A 2002 with 30,000 miles on it shouldn't run you more than $3000, maybe 2500 if you can find a good deal. It's a much better bike than the 89.
     


  11. KnowYourRights

    KnowYourRights Senior member

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    Am going to go out on a sturdy limb and say no.
    Solid advice, that. To the question about Brits being a good first bike: if only a vintage bike will do, I think you can buy a Brit and be plenty safe and satisfied. All old bikes of all ethnicities have their issues (Honda charging systems anyone?). If you do decide on a Brit, start with a late-'70s T140/TR7. You get an authentic "Triumph experience" in a 750cc bike that is more than capable in modern traffic. Or an early '70s T100 with its 500cc motor. A few things to consider: - Is there a local shop near you that caters to the ethnicity of bike you just bought? Me? One of the best Brit shops in the US is a few miles from my house. Japanese shops? 45-minutes away. Manuals are great. So are the Interwebs. But sometimes you need to walk in, drop your rusty POS on the counter, and get some solid advice form the guy that's been working on the bikes for decades. - Are you prepared to start a bike as it should be started: with your leg? All vintage Brits--excluding the late-model Norton Commando and Triumph TSS/TSX--are kickstart-only. Once you learn your bike's unique starting procedure, no worries. But new riders--who will stall their bikes the moment the light turns green--may find kickstarting a bike while horns blare a little unnerving. - Are you looking for a vintage bike? Or a just used bike? Big difference. Brits can be demanding to own. But with proper maintenance, these bikes will run and run and run. I have 3, and none of them has ever left me stranded. Ever. Any vintage bike can be a victim of original design flaws, neglect, and ham-fisted hammer-wielders. Do your homework on the specific bike you're considering. Given the same general condition, I'd pick a vintage British bike over a vintage Japanese/Italian/German bike any day of the week.
     


  12. CDFS

    CDFS Senior member

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    That's a pretty old "gentleman's sports" bike. With any bike like that, I'd be buying the previous owner, not the bike. My pops has a 1987 Hurricane 1000, and I'd buy that one, because he can account for every oil change and mile since new. But a dodgy Viffer with F1 pipes I'd run run run away from. Viffers are sort of a pain to work on too - tight clearances, fiddly between the banks carbs. But that gear-drive cam noise is sweet.
    This is good advice.
    Why not get a Gen 5? A 2002 with 30,000 miles on it shouldn't run you more than $3000, maybe 2500 if you can find a good deal. It's a much better bike than the 89.
    This: [​IMG] beats this: [​IMG] , of course, although, I've heard the vtec system is rather thirsty. But I'm afraid $ 2,500.- beats the € 1,000 I'm willing/able to spend at the moment. Where I live asking prices for the 2002 version start at € 3,800.- with around 45,000 miles.
     


  13. bigbjorn

    bigbjorn Senior member

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    I'd pick a vintage British bike over a vintage Japanese/Italian/German bike any day of the week.
    I'd pick a Moto Guzzi (non chrome-bore one). The electrics will undoubtedly be dodgy, but I have a lot of experience working on tractors, so I think I'd feel at home. [​IMG]

    Agree with the reco on _which_ vintage trumps, if nothing else will do. I find the 500cc bikes remarkably nicer than the 650s. They just feel lighter, less vibey, more in tune, happier in every way.
     


  14. KnowYourRights

    KnowYourRights Senior member

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    I'd pick a Moto Guzzi (non chrome-bore one). The electrics will undoubtedly be dodgy, but I have a lot of experience working on tractors, so I think I'd feel at home. [​IMG]

    I would absolutely make room in my garage for a an Eldo.

    Agree with the reco on _which_ vintage trumps, if nothing else will do. I find the 500cc bikes remarkably nicer than the 650s. They just feel lighter, less vibey, more in tune, happier in every way.

    Agree.

    I would put forth the '79 Bonnie as a candidate. Disks front and rear (granted, 10-inchers and not floating, but disks nonetheless), the Mark II carbs, and Lucas factory electronic ignition that works! [​IMG]
     


  15. pat pearson

    pat pearson Senior member

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    That silver cb750 looks very clean.


    Working on the seat a little:

    [​IMG]

    Anyone know of a place to find a good tail light? I've searched all over for a small, round, dual function that I can sink in the seat but nothing is footing the bill. Led or bulb is fine.


    [​IMG]
     


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