Motorcycle Jeans Project

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by j, Mar 28, 2008.

  1. bubba04

    bubba04 Senior member

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    Have you seen the denim version of the BMW city pants?

    [​IMG]

    They're pretty bad-ass, and I've been thinking of getting a pair for some time now....

     


  2. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I saw those...but I am pretty sure I dislike them.

    I'd probably wear the normal ones instead:
    [​IMG]
     


  3. TRINI

    TRINI Senior member

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  4. Ponyboy312

    Ponyboy312 Senior member

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    Just upgraded my bike this season, so too low on cash to buy a pair of Maple new @ full price (even though I want a pair bad as hell). I'm looking to buy a used pair from a sufu user or an irregular pair from Dave. I wear size 32. PM me or reply with quote if you can sell me a pair of Maple's in size 32.

    Thank you.
     


  5. emptym

    emptym Moderator Moderator

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    There's an Australian company selling kevlar-lined jeans on eBay for about $170 shipped to the US. Different fits. I haven't tried them though.
     


  6. rm20

    rm20 Member

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    hey all. this is my first post / time to style forum, so please forgive any newbie mistakes.

    this thread is been EXACTLY what i'm looking for, but seems like people still have a hard time finding good jeans? i just got a new bike recently after having been inspire by the cafe racers in Iron & Air's new mag. cool vintage Honda.

    just curious if anyone on this thread has actually been in a crash / spill with any of the aforementioned jeans? (i feel like the abrasion resistance is almost more important than impact resistance for the jeans...or is this wildly off base?)
     


  7. Ponyboy312

    Ponyboy312 Senior member

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    I'm inclined to agree. The pads in most pants seem like they will do more for peice of mind than actual protection. I have not, thankfully gone down in a way that would test my jeans' abrasion resistance. Welcome to Style.
     


  8. rm20

    rm20 Member

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    thanks pony.

    i've actually decided to do a little research on this (emphasis on little so far but intend to poke around more), with a focus on the fabrics so far.

    seems like the majority of existing motorcycle jeans only have kevlar patches on critical points. curious if anyone has had any experience with jeans with cordura nylon woven through?

    http://www.cordura.com/en/fabric/denim-fabric.html

    seems pretty interesting.

    also found a company called Schoeller that apparently produces some of the fabrics in BMW's motorcycle gear. apparently they produce very premium (expensive) fabrics, and have a division that caters to motorcycles:

    http://www.schoeller-textiles.com/en/fabric-groups/protection/schoeller-dynatec.html

    and also

    http://www.sport-touring.net/forums/index.php?topic=1077.0#.UfQdAGTuWp0

    anyone have experience with those fabrics? my goal again is just to find a pair of jeans that look completely normal but have more protection against road rash than normal jeans. a pair of jeans that you'd want to wear off the bike just as much as on it.

    i'm even curious how hard it'd be to get some of the above fabric and make a pair myself!


     


  9. Ponyboy312

    Ponyboy312 Senior member

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    I wouldn't trust myself (or a local tailor) to stitch kevlar or cordura into a pair of paints I was counting on to save my ass (literally). I'll look for the article, but I've read that cordura has alot of manufacturer sponsored hype out there but fails on actual tests. I couldn't find that article, but here is some other data.


    Tear and Abrasion Strength by the numbers
    Pounds of force until fabric tears Abrasion cycles on pavement until fabric fails
    CottonJeans 4.5 pounds to tear 50 cycles to failure
    70 Denier Standard Nylon 4.5 pounds to tear 165 cycles to failure
    500 Denier Polyester 8 pounds to tear 180 cycles to failure
    200 Denier Standard Nylon 7.5 pounds to tear 275 cycles to failure
    500 Denier Cordura 22 pounds to tear 710 cycles to failure
    620 Denier Cordura 35 pounds to tear 1200 cycles to failure
    NEW Competition Grade Leather 80-110 pounds to tear 1200-1700 cycles to failure
    1000 Denier Cordura 110 pounds to tear 1780 cycles to failure
    Air Mesh Kevlar 1260 pounds to tear 970 cycles to failure Stretch Kevlar Blend 420lbs pounds to tear 1800 cycles to failure

    This is how quickly some materials take to hole:
    Material Seconds
    Denim 0.2 to 0.5
    Some race gloves 0.6
    Most leather gloves 1.0 to 1.8
    Keprotec stretch material 0.9
    Poor Kevlar 1.0
    Two layers of waxed cotton 1.3
    1.3mm thick cow hide 3.8
    Two layers of 1.3mm thick cowhide 18
    Three layers of 1.3mm thick cowhide 55
    Two layers of Kevlar plain weave 5.6
    Suede 18
    Boot leather (generally 2.2mm thick) 20
    Leather stretch panels 20.4


    There is also this test from a while back:

    Drag Test

    "For the Drag Test, samples were stitched to a bag that held a 75-pound
    sandbag inside a milk crate, then dragged behind a pickup truck..."

    New, 100% Cotton Denim Jeans ----------------------- 3' 10"
    Senior Balistic Nylon ----------------------------------- 3' 10"
    Leather, Lightweight, Nude Finish, 2.25 oz/sq. ft. --- 4' 3"
    Leather, Fashion Weight, 1.75 oz/sq ft. ------------- 4' 4"
    Two-year-old 100% Cotton Denim Jeans ------------ 4' 5"
    Cordura Nylon Type 440 ----------------------------- 18' 3"
    Kevlar 29 Aramid Fiber, Style 713 ------------------ 22' 1"
    Leather, Competition Weight, 3 oz/sq. ft. -------- 86' 0"


    Taber Test

    "For the Taber Test, the specimen was mounted on a rotating platform and
    scuffed by two rubber-emery grinding wheels." The numbers represent the
    number of revolutions until the fabric totally fails. A vacuum clears
    debris.

    Two-year-old 100% Cotton Denim Jeans 168
    New 100% Cotton Denim Jeans 225
    Kevlar 29 Aramid Fiber, Style 713 506
    Cordura Nylon, Type 440 559
    Leather, Lightweight, Nude Finish, 2.25 oz./sq. ft. 564
    Leather, Fashion Weight, 1.75 oz./sq. ft. 750
    Senior Ballistic Nylon 817
    Leather, Competition Weight, 3 oz./sq. ft. 2600

    More to consider...

    "Finally, protection from road abrasion cannot be guaranteed by a
    materials abrasion resistance alone. A jacket may have panels of
    highly abrasion-resistant materials, yet if low-quality stitching joins
    those panels and the seams come apart upon impact or during a slide, then
    the abrasion resistance of the panels could count for nothing.
    Furthermore, an ill-fitting garment may ride up in a slide, contorting
    the body and exposing the skin. And the best jacket in the world, left
    unzipped and/or unsnapped, won't give riders the protection they pay
    for. When it comes to safety, the issues are more complex than just the
    abrasion resistance of materials." __________________

    From another site:

    The textiles vs leathers debate is all about tradeoffs. Choosing which material to use to cover your hide with and spend your pennies on depends on how much you value individual tradeoffs and ultimately, your intended use and riding conditions. Sounds easy enough, but deciding between textiles vs leathers has had great rider minds in a muddle and increasingly so over the last couple of years as the quality and versatility of both materials has improved so much! Just type in “textiles vs leathers ” into google and you will find that 90% of the results are from forums with the answer ultimately resulting in the fact that it depends on your personal preferences. The problem is that this does not help those new to the biking world who have not had the time or experience to develop their own, well-guided preferences… and so the argument goes on.
    But, it’s really quite simple if you use the BMI (Best Motorcycle Information) textiles vs leathers test. This test takes the four most differentiating attributes of the two materials into consideration – price, maintenance, comfort and protection. Each attribute is also assigned to either leathers or textiles, depending on which material has the greater advantage in terms of the attribute. After reading the brief summary on each, assign a score out of a hundred to each attribute, giving those attributes that are most important to you higher scores, so that in the end the total score of your four attributes adds to 100. Then add up the score that you gave to the leather attributes and textile attributes, and the material with the highest score is your answer – and best of all it will be unique to your personal preferences.
    Price - Textiles
    Motorcycle textiles are cheaper to buy than leathers. It is also much harder to judge the quality of leathers and so you take the risk of paying a lot of money for a suit that does not have quality stitching and construction. (Just beware however that it is widely accepted that your textile suit will probably only survive one crash before you have to fork out for a new pair.)
    Maintenance - Textiles
    This one is simple – motorcycle textiles can be thrown in a commercial washer, while leathers will need to be sent to the cleaners.
    Comfort - Textiles
    Motorcycle textiles have an all weather capability: vents for when it is warm, liners for when it is cold and water resistance for rain. It breathes more easily than leather, and water slides off it like a ducks back.
    Leather is also much heavier than textile.
    Protection - Leather
    Tests are conducted all the time to compare the abrasion resistance of motorcycle riding gear materials and leather always comes out on top as the most durable material. Furthermore, leather does not melt from friction, it will cushion your fall more than motorcycle textiles would and it offers the best protection against a road rash. The fact that leather also lasts through multiple crashes whilst textiles will probably only last through one, says a lot about the difference in protection and impact between the two materials.
    The textiles vs leathers debate basically comes down to protection vs everything else.
     


  10. rm20

    rm20 Member

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    whoa...thanks for the info pony.

    out of curiosity what pants to you ride in?

    i just emailed schoeller to see if i could get any information on their dynatec line, so who knows...
     


  11. epb

    epb Senior member

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    The safest jeans are going to have armor, which means they're not going to look normal off the bike. What I've got is Kevlar undies that look like thermal underwear; you can wear them with anything. My street clothes would shred, but I'd avoid road rash. I'm still considering getting pockets for armor (D3O knee armor, at least) sewn on for some impact protection, and it wouldn't look as "in your face" as, say, my BMW City Denims do.
     


  12. Ponyboy312

    Ponyboy312 Senior member

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    I ride in a pair of Unbranded 21oz jeans. Its safe to say that cotton, of any weight, will provide bupkis protection in a down. There are a pair of jeans called Maple that have kevlar lining that look okay, but I'm don't care for either of their current cuts.

    I may break down and get a pair of those kevlar undies epb mentioned, but I'm not buying anymore gear this season, so I've got some time to figure it out.
     


  13. Ponyboy312

    Ponyboy312 Senior member

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    Update: I went ahead and pulled the trigger on a pair of Ironhearts 25oz. Not sure how much protection I'll get if needed, but goddamn if they aint pretty. Safety v. Style is always a game of compromise.
     


  14. epb

    epb Senior member

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    Speaking of which, I snagged some Bilt "Iron Worker" jeans; they were on sale on Amazon for $70 (reg. price $120) so I figured what the heck. My thoughts:

    Pros:
    -the jeans come with CE-rated knee armor. The hip armor isn't included, but there are pockets for you to add your own.

    - Kevlar coverage area is as good as I've seen on any jeans/pants that weren't fully-lined. Good seat coverage, some in the hip area going down to the knee, and a broad swath covers the knee area itself.

    -they also included a zipper along the back between belt loops to attach to your jacket if it's got that option. I guess I should mention this zipper and the fly are YKK, since apparently we're supposed to give a damn about that nowadays.

    Overall, from a safety and function perspective, they look like they get the job done.

    Cons:
    - inseam length. I ordered a 34R which resulted in a 32-inch inseam, which is a bit short for me, brushing the tops of my feet without a break. There doesn't appear to be an option for 34L, but it should look okay with riding boots, I guess.

    - while the knee armor is CE-rated, it looks/feels pretty cheap. And unlike most Kevlar jeans, the pockets don't let you adjust where the armor sits relative to your knee (though in my case it's spot-on). I'll likely pull the armor and wear my Forcefield Limb Tubes anyway, like I do under non-Kevlar pants and jeans. I like the fit and they add shin protection.

    -because they've got a big zipper along the back, there's no middle belt loop to attach jackets that use that option (like mine)

    - the denim is touted as "hard-wearing" but feels pretty flimsy, pretty much like my Levis. Since these jeans are typically single-use when you have an off, they appear to have decided why bother with the good stuff?

    - from a fashion perspective, they seem over-styled to me. There are seams with contrasting stitching running everywhere. Some are stitched in yellow, some light blue, some dark blue. They seem to have wanted to highlight the Kevlar placement, rather than downplay it like other brands. The rivets and waistband closure button are super plain. There are some sort of darts sewn in mid-knee, apparently to encourage the material to bend when you're on the bike. To be fair, I think almost all Kevlar jeans are over-styled. Icon Victory has those weird leather inserts, Dianese has that dumbass giant fox on the pockets, etc...

    In sum, I'd recommend these if you want Kelvar jeans to wear on your bike and you care more about the safety/price ratio than the looks, and a default inseam of 32" works for you.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2013


  15. otc

    otc Senior member

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    I was excited and ready to order until I read halfway through your post :(

    Good price though.
     


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