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Moth problems

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Alexis, Nov 24, 2004.

  1. Alexis

    Alexis Senior member

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    Does anyone know how to deal with moths short of mothballs?
     


  2. Phil

    Phil Senior member

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    I pack my seasonal suits in cotton/muslin garment bags and throw a few cedar balls or blocks in there with them. Never had even one moth hole over the past 10 years or so.
     


  3. Alexis

    Alexis Senior member

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    Thanks, Phil. Have a great holiday.
     


  4. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    If you fear that certain items might have moth infestation, before putting them away, pop them into the deep freeze for some 36 hours. This will kill off any eggs or larvae (the cedar will not), bit it won't do your garments any harm.

    Apparently, using industrial deep freezing units is the best way to get rid of woodworm in antique furniture (just move the whole table, bed or wardrobe into one of these units).
     


  5. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    Good suggestions. I'd add that the most important thing you can do to keep clothes free of moth problems is to check them for food spots before putting them away. Moths / their larvae are not attracted to wool; actually they eat the food that's stuck to the fibers and happen to eat the fibers along with it. So spot clean any food you get on your clothes and give everything a gentle cleaning when it needs it.

    Aromatic cedar scent, whether from the actual wood or the essential oil, which is very inexpensive and makes your closet and room smell great, will help repel moths in the first place.

    If you have access to a big enough freezer, freezing the items in question is a very good idea, for preventative maintenance before long term storage.
     


  6. kabert

    kabert Senior member

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    Go to www.improvementscatalog.com and order the Pantry Pest Trap(s). Item 140335. $9.99 for two. They are triangular traps that attract moths with some sweet sticky gunk (that stays inside the triangle trap). They rid my prior house of an occasional moth we'd see. So I now use them "just in case" a stray moth should get inside the house. We have them in kitchen cupboards and in clothes closets.
     


  7. AlanC

    AlanC Minister of Trad

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    I have read that one of the best things to do is brush your clothes as it will dislodge any moth eggs, which are the problem as the larvae hatch and begin munching.

    After losing a valued suit a couple of years ago, I now keep all my suits and sportscoats/blazers in breathable bags I pick up at Walmart for a couple of bucks each (the bags are also excellent for throwing a few hangables in for car travel). It doesn't make my closet the most exciting to look at nor does it sound very luxurious, but I can't afford to have the little critters chomping away on my woolens.
     


  8. mr. magoo

    mr. magoo Senior member

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    According to the VERY nice fellow who runs French American re-weaving (i.e., his job is to repair moth holes), cedar only works for the first six months or so. It dries out and loses its repelling power.
     


  9. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    This is true; however you can revivify it with a light sanding, or use the essential oil and reapply once in a while. I have some of the oil; a small bottle that will go for quite a long time cost about $6. One good way to use it if you have regular incandescent lightbulbs (or can lights) would be to get lightbulb oil burners and put the oil in them, on your closet lightbulbs. The heat from the bulb heats the oil and projects the scent nicely. The burners are very cheap, a few dollars at most probably.
     


  10. Horace

    Horace Senior member

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    I wonder though -- if this is only when the cedar is exposed to air. I have some closets -- fully lined in cedar -- that rarely are opened. In them, I've stored many winter coats, and the cedar has remained fresh for 15 years.
     


  11. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    That seems to be true of aromatic cedar chests I've seen as well. One my stepdad made for my aunt in high school still smells very strongly of cedar when opened. Unfortunately (?)most closets are constructed to allow some airflow, and are probably not sealed tightly enough to keep the cedar working as long as yours has. It would seem smart to have some airflow for a closet one uses for day-to-day use, however.
     


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