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Most Abused Words

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by dexterhaven, Jul 19, 2010.

  1. SpooPoker

    SpooPoker Internet Bigtimer and Most Popular Man on Campus Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    ^^ is that "ask" but pronounced "axe" If thats what you meant then I agree x1000 thats so fucking annoying
     
  2. AntiHero84

    AntiHero84 Senior member

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    I caught myself using "kinda" a few times this weekend. [​IMG]

    I usually hate when people use that word.
     
  3. JLibourel

    JLibourel Senior member

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    "Bellwether" in its common contemporary usage.

    Properly, a bellwether is a castrated ram that wears a bell for the other sheep to follow--hence, the leader of a mindless herd. For example, "Sarah Palin is a bellwether of the tea party conservatives."

    However, by similarities with the word "weathervane" (and because most educated people today don't know WTF a "wether" is) the word has been subverted into a meaning like "predictor" or "trend setter": "The recent GOP victories in local elections are bellwethers of a Republican landslide in November."

    Another one I just hate is "kudo," as in, "He deserves a kudo for his good work." This is an ignorant back formation from the Greek "kudos," which is singular to begin with and has no plural. Unfortunately, "kudo" has been sanctioned by certain descriptivist lexicographers, damn them!
     
  4. tagutcow

    tagutcow Senior member

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    I cannot imagine that this phrase is really abused in your daily life.

    My mother often uses the phrase, "Take it from whence it comes."
     
  5. Dakota rube

    Dakota rube Senior member

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    ^she's talking about sechs
     
  6. why

    why Senior member

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    aks
    ^^ is that "ask" but pronounced "axe" If thats what you meant then I agree x1000 thats so fucking annoying
    This is actually Chaucer's preferred spelling of the word. [​IMG]
    My mother often uses the phrase, "Take it from whence it comes."
    I realize 'from whence' has a sloppy redundancy despite its prevalent usage, but I think a lot of it is due to its use in prosody. Shakespeare uses 'from' -- or other prepositions like 'of' -- for metrical reasons at times (it's a perfect iamb that way) and later authors would likely maintain the preposition in prose because of Shakespeare's influence, but it occurred in earlier writers too: Chaucer and William Langland both occasionally used the phrase 'fro whennes...come'. Chaucer could be said to use it for metrical reasons (same meter as Shakespeare), but Langland's Piers Plowman doesn't use accentual meter so I don't know why he uses it. I wonder if the modern platitude comes from a shared source.
     
  7. LucasCLarson

    LucasCLarson Senior member

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  8. Connemara

    Connemara Senior member

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    "Should of" instead of "should have." Drives me crazy every time I see it.......
    +1
     
  9. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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  10. lbcgav

    lbcgav Senior member

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    FML, I like literally just went to the worst club last night. The myriad people were totally unbalanced. I mean if you even moved wrong they would be cheese and try to fuck. I was walking to the bar and saw a guy dancing with a pinecorn, it was so random. Wow, just wow. The music was so money though, I legit could have danced all night but decided not to. Some other people started to dipset around the same time as me, I was like "that's so ironic". Ya know, you just can't find a good club anymore. I should of just stuck with the Classy Cat Club since it's like obviously the most legit club around here. I love it, but whatever, I'm fixin to find one more epic than that. Irregardless, you should just come club scoutin' with me one night. I mean we could find one that is totally awesome, you know what I mean?

    This is in the negative, so I don't see a problem. The problem is when it's in the positive, so something like, "it's hard to find a good club anymore" would be the incorrect usage. Unless I'm missing something.
     
  11. lbcgav

    lbcgav Senior member

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    PIN number. So you really mean personal identification number number?
     
  12. WorkingClassDude

    WorkingClassDude Senior member

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    There's this guy at work who says 'supposably'. I don't want to correct him with 'supposedly' because he argues in such a fashion that it'd be easier just not to bring it up.
     
  13. dcg

    dcg Senior member

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    There's this guy at work who says 'supposably'. I don't want to correct him with 'supposedly' because he argues in such a fashion that it'd be easier just not to bring it up.

    I used to work with a guy who favored "supposingly". Perhaps they are cousins.
     
  14. tagutcow

    tagutcow Senior member

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    PIN number. So you really mean personal identification number number?

    Sure. How else are you going to get money out of the ATM machine?
     
  15. SpooPoker

    SpooPoker Internet Bigtimer and Most Popular Man on Campus Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    Did someone say "Valentimes" yet?
     
  16. kwiteaboy

    kwiteaboy Senior member

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    Nauseous.

    "Addicting" instead of "addictive". I don't care what the dictionary says.
     
  17. thecentennial

    thecentennial Senior member

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    Pacifically, skellington, specicivity
     
  18. Agnacious

    Agnacious Senior member

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    I notice people on this board use "Conflate" often when they really mean "Confuse".

    And as someone else said the "Seriously?" and "Really?", as if they are constantly trying out to be an extra on The Office.
     
  19. Another New Yorker

    Another New Yorker Senior member

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  20. L'Incandescent

    L'Incandescent Senior member

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    skellington

    I've never heard this, but I love it! I'm going to start abusing it.

    Another word that's abused is issue, used as a euphemism for problem.
     

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