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Modernist Cuisine; the $625 cookbook.

Discussion in 'Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel' started by mm84321, Feb 15, 2011.

  1. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Pull it out at 118-120, mm.
    Kyle, why do you hate science?
     
  2. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    Kyle, why do you hate science?
    I love science.
     
  3. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    thanks. i can see the number being a lot higher for a pan-cooked inch-thick steak than for, say, an oven-cooked rib roast. Still, it seems silly to get too precise with this sort of thing as there are just too many variables. Significant digits and whatnot.
    I agree with this. I don't ever use a thermometer for just that reason, though I have, of course, checked from time to time in my magic kitchen.
     
  4. mm84321

    mm84321 Senior member

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    Matt was right. Pulled the steak out at 114°, let it rest for 12 minutes under foil, and the internal temperature rose to 131° F, for a total carry over of 17°. It was roughly an inch thick before being cooked, seared both sides in a cast iron skillet, then finished it in a 400° oven.
     
  5. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Matt was right. Pulled the steak out at 114°, let it rest for 12 minutes under foil, and the internal temperature rose to 131° F, for a total carry over of 17°. It was roughly an inch thick before being cooked, seared both sides in a cast iron skillet, then finished it in a 400° oven.
    Was it better than when you would take it out later? I find that more resting time is always better.
     
  6. mm84321

    mm84321 Senior member

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    Was it better than when you would take it out later? I find that more resting time is always better.

    It was. I'd usually take it out more in the 120-125° range, and only let it sit for maybe five or so minutes. This way, it was noticeably juicier and had a far superior texture. I probably could have let it continue to rest longer than 12 minutes, but the alarm on my probe thermometer was set to go off once it hit 130°.
     
  7. binge

    binge Senior member

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    The question is, Matt: how does it compare to Gwyneth Paltrow's cook book?











    And don't front...we know you have a copy.
     
  8. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Alright, so we made two things from here today. One was the ham and cheese "omelet" and the other was the parmesan creme brulee. The omelet was cool, and I can see how it is interesting, but I make better omelets the old fashioned way. The creme brulee was actually pretty classic, but cooked in a steam oven rather than a bain marie, and obviously had parmesan. It was fucking fantastic. Both recipes were super easy to follow, and very precise.
     
  9. mm84321

    mm84321 Senior member

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  10. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    How was the ham and cheese "omelet" prepared? Are you going to try the striped mushroom "omelet"?
    basically the same way, without the stripes and with a different filling.
     
  11. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Curious to hear your opinions on it after you get it.
    OK, so obviously I haven't read the whole thing, and I have made only a few recipes from it, but I have to say, the more I have it the more I like it. Especially cool is the very beginning of volume 2 where they explain the ins and outs of traditional cooking methods. It really gives you a good handle on why some things can be a pain in the ass to get right, and others are more effective. I've really enjoyed learning why cooking in an oven basically sucks, which is something that isn't unfamiliar to a lot of us who have cooked a good amount, while other methods seem much more consistent.

    Other parts of the book, especially the fetishizing of making the ultimate (fill in the blank with comfort food) is kind of boring to me, but that may be because I don't associate those foods with what I really want to eat as much as others do. I think it is going to be popular, though, with a lot of the people getting turned on to food recently, a bit how foodguy talks about the crossover from cocktail culture to wine culture.

    Other stuff is cool, but a bit too geeky for me, but whatever. I just don't demand some of the same in depth knowledge others do, but if you have a particular question, like what is the optimal frying batter for a certain outcome, they can be great. I just don't want to wade through all of it.

    What I don't really like, because I kind of have a problem with it in general, is the amount of time spent on all of the modern gels and chemicals used to create different textures. I suppose I should like it, as they might give great outcomes, but I have some sort of innate problem in reaching for a jar of sodium hexomatophosphate in order to get just the right temperature on an aspic. Not sure why, maybe it is the proximity to Alice Waters.

    Hope that answers some questions, I'll post more thoughts as I get more into it.
     
  12. mm84321

    mm84321 Senior member

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    Thanks for sharing your thoughts so far.

    I'd be interested to know what the book has to say about how to properly heat pans, when to add the oil, etc., and the issue of food sticking, specifically delicate fishes. I can't seem to be able to pan sautÃ[​IMG] fish like sole without it turning into a bloody mess after turning it. Maybe even you could offer me some advice on that matter.
     
  13. kwilkinson

    kwilkinson Senior member

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    I am obviously not Matt, but my understanding of it is that if you get the pan hot while dry, the cells will expand, and then the oil that you add sits on top of it, allowing the item to cook in the oil without sticking to the pan. If the oil is added when the pan is cold, or if the food is added when the pan is cold, when the pan heats up and the cells expand, some of whatever is in the pan is stuck to the pan b/c the cells expanded and trapped it in.
     
  14. mm84321

    mm84321 Senior member

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    I am obviously not Matt, but my understanding of it is that if you get the pan hot while dry, the cells will expand, and then the oil that you add sits on top of it, allowing the item to cook in the oil without sticking to the pan. If the oil is added when the pan is cold, or if the food is added when the pan is cold, when the pan heats up and the cells expand, some of whatever is in the pan is stuck to the pan b/c the cells expanded and trapped it in.

    This is the explanation I had heard as well. However, even when trying to properly heat my pan, I never have any luck with delicate fish not falling apart. Lower heat, perhaps?
     
  15. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I am obviously not Matt, but my understanding of it is that if you get the pan hot while dry, the cells will expand, and then the oil that you add sits on top of it, allowing the item to cook in the oil without sticking to the pan. If the oil is added when the pan is cold, or if the food is added when the pan is cold, when the pan heats up and the cells expand, some of whatever is in the pan is stuck to the pan b/c the cells expanded and trapped it in.
    Also, oils tend to get sticky as they are heated, so adding them just before the meat gives better results.
     
  16. shibbel

    shibbel Senior member

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    huh?
    No kidding, I ruined a pan once with olive oil- scorched it, and couldn't clean it off for the life of me.
     
  17. ImaPro

    ImaPro Senior member

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    That looks tasty
     
  18. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    there isn't a right or wrong answer to when to heat the oil. you get different effects. think of cooking onions for the most obvious example. if you start the onions in cold oil, they kind of melt into the oil, cook for a long time and become sweeter; if you start them in hot oil, they remain intact, are done more quickly and have a more aggressive flavor.
    for proteins that are sticking, there are two possible factors: first, you always want to start proteins in a hot pan (i'm trying to think of an exception, there might be one, but I'm drawing a blank). second, proteins will tend to stick until their surface is completely dried ... or as we cooks call it, browned. don't be in too big a hurry to mess with what's in the pan. let it get a good sear. if it doesn't move when you touch it, let it go a little longer (even if you need to reduce the heat a little).
     
  19. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Hey fg-

    I'm having trouble parsing what they say about braising and using the broiler. Can you read that section, really just page 99 in volume 2, and explain what they are suggesting. They say to put the covered pot on low heat and under the broiler. I'm confused. How do I do this?
     
  20. foodguy

    foodguy Senior member

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    no puedo! they recalled their review copies and i'm on the wait list for my own.
     

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