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Modern/European Kitchen Cabinets

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by CommercialDoc, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    We did the same about ten years ago, but used Siematic. It has held up extremely well, and initially I worried about the high gloss. Ikea ones I have seen don't seem to last as well, but YMMV.

    How much do you use the kitchen, Matt? What is the cabinetry? wood, plywood/veneer, stainless?
     
  2. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    How much do you use the kitchen, Matt? What is the cabinetry? wood, plywood/veneer, stainless?

    We cook at home 4 or 5 nights a week. Sometimes less, but that is a good average.

    The cabinets are MDF with high gloss polyester lacquer. The reason we decided on Siematic over a cabinetmaker was that the high quality lacquer was illegal to do in the USA for health reasons.
     
  3. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    We cook at home 4 or 5 nights a week. Sometimes less, but that is a good average.

    The cabinets are MDF with high gloss polyester lacquer. The reason we decided on Siematic over a cabinetmaker was that the high quality lacquer was illegal to do in the USA for health reasons.


    4-5 nights/week is what i would consider high use. And if they still look good, that is telling. Thanks for the info.
     
  4. briancl

    briancl Senior member

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    Is there a good resource anyone could recommend to do research on all of these higher end brands? Doesn't have to be limited to kitchens or cabinetry.

    Thanks..
     
  5. CommercialDoc

    CommercialDoc Senior member

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    Ikea and Kraftmaid are sufficient if matched with things that make the space look "modern." Frankly, I think 60 ft of cabinets is overkill but maybe you have a lot of kids or something.

    When I look at homes for sale, I look at the cabinetry and make an immediate judgement about the house's need for renovation.


    The 60 ft includes a very large island as well as a matching wet bar. Also, it is a big kitchen.

    Is there a good resource anyone could recommend to do research on all of these higher end brands? Doesn't have to be limited to kitchens or cabinetry.

    Thanks..


    The two websites that seem to contain helpful information are:

    http://livemodern.com/forums/materialsmethods

    and

    http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/kitchbath/


    I am glad to hear people appreciate the investment. My wife has her heart set on Pedini and many have told me that I am crazy to spend so much on boxes. I feel that the cabinets are a real part of the home's interior decor.

    I have examined Poliform, Poggenpohl and Pedini extensively and they all seem to be identical in quality. Some have better name recognition and correspondingly higher prices. The style varies a bit but not consderably.
     
  6. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    Thanks for the info, CDoc!
     
  7. rdawson808

    rdawson808 Senior member

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    Worth their (lot of) money: Boffi and Varenna


    Wow, some of those are just amazing. I'm not much of a fan of the ultra modern sleek lines, but the all stainless, commercial kitchen-looking stuff is beautiful.

    b
     
  8. CommercialDoc

    CommercialDoc Senior member

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    We are leaning towards a combination of these styles from Pedini:

    http://www.pediniusa.com/outline7.html

    http://www.pediniusa.com/artika_18.html

    Elements of all their different models can be combined. I am not sure if this option is available with Poggenpohl. The reason we are looking at Poggenpohl, Pedini and Poliform/Varenna is that they are the brands readily available in Pittsburgh.
     
  9. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Without any doubt, the best of the best is Balthaup. Their engineering is miles better than anybody else. Style-wise, I prefer Boffi, but the Balthaup stuff just works better.
     
  10. CommercialDoc

    CommercialDoc Senior member

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    From my limited knowledge, the price for these brands would be closer to 75k for a kitchen my size. That being said, they do look terrific.
     
  11. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    American maker might be less for similar style/quality. sorry, don't know them but came across this site and seemed interesting: www.henrybuilt.com
     
  12. Violinist

    Violinist Senior member

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    American maker might be less for similar style/quality. sorry, don't know them but came across this site and seemed interesting: www.henrybuilt.com

    All of that stuff looks so incredibly dated. This whole 70s revival isn't going to last long.

    I can't believe people are into wenge wood and shag carpets again.
     
  13. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    All of that stuff looks so incredibly dated. This whole 70s revival isn't going to last long.

    I can't believe people are into wenge wood and shag carpets again.


    Do you think? I only looked at shapes. He seems to be copying those of the Italian kitchen cabinet makers.
     
  14. Violinist

    Violinist Senior member

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    Do you think? I only looked at shapes. He seems to be copying those of the Italian kitchen cabinet makers.

    Yea of course. These square panels everywhere is just so disciplined. There is no character at all with that kind of design, it's so cold and by now, incredibly generic.
     
  15. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Yea of course. These square panels everywhere is just so disciplined. There is no character at all with that kind of design, it's so cold and by now, incredibly generic.
    I've never bought into the universality of cold and warm in design. To me, there is nothing more sterile feeling than a newly built house done in the classic style. It just smells of trying to be something that no longer is. An old, classic house is fine, but new ones, and especially new kitchens done in Classic European style just scream "wrong" to me. Of course, I am biased having been brought up with a heavy dose of modernism, so it is what feels natural and comforting to me. On the other hand, I am no fan of wood kitchens. I think they look cheesy and like somebody is attempting to add "warmth" to what really should be a machine.
     
  16. Violinist

    Violinist Senior member

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    I've never bought into the universality of cold and warm in design. To me, there is nothing more sterile feeling than a newly built house done in the classic style. It just smells of trying to be something that no longer is. Of course, I am biased having been brought up with a heavy dose of modernism, so it is what feels natural and comforting to me.

    On the other hand, I am no fan of wood kitchens. I think they look cheesy and like somebody is attempting to add "warmth" to what really should be a machine.


    No I agree, and I have no problem with an industrial, stainless steel french style kitchen either. I'm also not a fan of McMansions and that style, but most of the modernism you see today is full of Eames chairs and MvdR... not exactly something "current". People who live in a modernist setting love to put down people who live in Federalist houses and such built in 1990, telling them that they're trying to relive what happened long before, when they themselves are not exactly living in something so modern. So, you don't have to be live in something totally modern that looks like a high end Ikea catalogue or some tragic Tuscan Revival in a Pasadena cul-de-sac. There's a lot in between, and it's quite easy for many things to look sterile if it is generic and uninspired. Thinking that a period house has to be from that time is just lazy thinking.
     
  17. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    No I agree, and I have no problem with an industrial, stainless steel french style kitchen either. I'm also not a fan of McMansions and that style, but most of the modernism you see today is full of Eames chairs and MvdR... not exactly something "current". People who live in a modernist setting love to put down people who live in Federalist houses and such built in 1990, telling them that they're trying to relive what happened long before, when they themselves are not exactly living in something so modern.

    I couple of years ago I read a very interesting article about this phenomenon. It was based on Le Corbusier's idea of "period" versus modern and excoriated people for doing exactly what you say. "Modern," when referring to 1920-60s furniture is now nothing but another form of "period," and one wonders what the original modernists would think about that.
     
  18. Violinist

    Violinist Senior member

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    I couple of years ago I read a very interesting article about this phenomenon. It was based on Le Corbusier's idea of "period" versus modern and excoriated people for doing exactly what you say. "Modern," when referring to 1920-60s furniture is now nothing but another form of "period," and one wonders what the original modernists would think about that.

    I don't imagine they'd look on said ignorance favorably.

    Personally I cannot stand being around so many things which look like they'd been built by CNC machines. In public places, modern architecture works extremely well, but to live in, it depresses me. A lot of it is far too rationalized, sensible, and clean.
     
  19. johnapril

    johnapril Senior member

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    I don't imagine they'd look on said ignorance favorably.

    Personally I cannot stand being around so many things which look like they'd been built by CNC machines. In public places, modern architecture works extremely well, but to live in, it depresses me. A lot of it is far too rationalized, sensible, and clean.


    Well, then it's a matter of taste and there's no right or wrong. I think the modernist kitchens are brilliant. Their application in the American ranch house intruigues me. I also have seen a kitchen recently built with hickory cabinets, white tile countertops, and stainless steel applicances that went quite well with the house, built in 1917. I grew up around both the more traditional homes as well as these modern interiors. That was in Clayton, MO where there was quite a bit of money, and typically both were done very well.
     
  20. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    All of that stuff looks so incredibly dated. This whole 70s revival isn't going to last long.

    I can't believe people are into wenge wood and shag carpets again.


    If anything the '70s are underrated. People who are into Modernism have a fetish for the '50s and '60s and many tend to look down on the '70s as tacky or plain ugly. This is especially true of "Modernist capitals" like LA.

    My idea of the perfect compromise of what you call sterile modernism and "warmth" are the designs of Edward Durell Stone:

    [​IMG]

    Yea of course. These square panels everywhere is just so disciplined. There is no character at all with that kind of design, it's so cold and by now, incredibly generic.

    I admit I have a particular fascination for strictness and discipline in design; there's something quite Teutonic about the idea, which I like. That said, I also appreciate something more organic and florid though in measured doses.
     

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