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Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Snapped today in the local ability equipment shop, Perth:

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Very good-mind you we have mobility than some of the youngsters today.....:D
     
  3. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    Correct quote,for the record....

     
  4. flyfronted

    flyfronted Senior member

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    I was 11 in 1969 the Skinhead boys in W10 were 15 - 18 and a million miles from the look we could manage .. Tuff wayfinders , imitation levis and a check button down from bush market .
     
  5. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    Eleven was a pivotal age for school kids.11+ exams ,mixing with older youths at High School,Youth Clubs,etc?Parents giving more trust,freedom etc
    You can't ignore the fact of some kids maturieing earlier than others also.In 69 I was twelve.All my mates were three to four years older,that probably explains why I was allowed to travel to away games etc with them..Everyone had a different story.By Eleven I was making my own clothing decisions,cooking my own meals and pretty much taking care of myself.That was just how the cards fell.On the other hand I had a classmate who still had his Dad polish his shoes for him at that age?
    ultimately though,as we are talking about Fashion,it's about perception,awareness ,desire and availability.
    Some people would rather do without than accept "second best"',some never know the difference.
    Within the next two years I would have skinhead mates in London wearing flares and Safari Jackets,while back home in the Midlands ,some kids my age were buying Crombies and Harringtons when they were past the sell by date.
    Today,no one would question the awareness of fashion/style/brands by a young teenager today and yet it seems unbelievable 45 yrs ago .
    I had never heard of J.Simon in 69-71 ,but was well aware of other shops in London,Birmingham etc at that time.No need for wayfinders and moody jeans
     
    Last edited: May 27, 2014
  6. yankmod

    yankmod Senior member

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    Some excellent recollections on daily life.Makes for a more multi-dimensional story.Outdoor Markets and Stalls.Would like to have seen NYC when there was no Autos and life went on IN the streets.
     
  7. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Just sticking to the "Skinhead" Topic can become tedious.I believe in putting more "meat to the bone",so that an understanding of what general life was like around that time-and how we arrived at that stage in our social history.
     
  8. yankmod

    yankmod Senior member

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    I think it shows that you Skins were regular folk not Folk Devils.Makes the story easier to relate to if you were or are outside the Skinhead subculture.
     
  9. Oneflewover

    Oneflewover Well-Known Member

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    Up here in Hull, 1969 and I was 11/12 11+ had gone to be replaced by Comprehensives. So we had to stay at Junior School an extra year. It was the first time a Junior school class of 11 and 12 yr olds was allowed to wear long trousers! Parents still buying clothes and short back and sides was still the instruction to the barber.

    The wearing of the long trousers in schools probably became a catalyst. All sorts of things changed, the main being being 'Choice'. Although we had no money, this was Hull, Father a Postman, Mother bringing up the three kids. We went to jumble sales so some self selection of clothing was available. We had sweets on a friday, when Grandad got paid.

    Even though it was 1969, kids are still playing on 'bombed buildings(created 1944)' and 'Little Switzerland' a disused quarry with hills, trees, frogs and newts. {as an aside, there is still a bombed building site(old cinema) in Hull that has not been rebuilt since the 2nd world war} But things are beginning to change, Girls, Football (you could get into Boothferry Park at 1/2 time for free) and Mecca dancing, saturday mornings for under 14s, afternoons for over 14s. Paper rounds, milk round, Saturday jobs. That's when we hit problems. Earn the money to go places on the same day as you are working. Some youth clubs, some discos.

    Friends, where all the same age, we wouldn't have friends younger, older boys wouldn't have younger, it just never happened.

    By 13 to 16, I was doing a paperound in a morning, delivering groceries on a pushbike (big basket on the front) on an evening. On a Saturday morning I was stacking milk crates in a dairy. This gave me enough money for a single, some jeans from the Jumble sale and a disco ticket and a bag of chips after (if you'd pulled). It was only at this time did a fashion ethos come in to what we are wearing. Sta Prest, Brutus, DMs, brouges (from the Army and Navy), Harringtons. So pretty late on the scene but plenty at the Jumble sale! and 2nd hand from friends.

    At 16 1974 I got an Engineering apprenticeship. The princely sum of £10.50 per week, of which £6 went to Mother for board. A pushbike on the never and smoking. (on a true, but sad note, a milk bottle picked up of a doorstep was only 25p filled with sherry from the Off Licence) So no MTM suits, no picking the cloth, just bad collars, huge lapels, long hair, discos and girls.

    All my Peer group where similar, all from working class families with at least a working parent. Everyone I knew got work after school, I never knew anyone who went to University until 1979, a friends girlfriend. Little curious Hull things, you never had friends from the other side of the River Hull. You never ventured down Hessle Road unless you where in the fishing industry. You never went on the council estates.

    I've read all the stories of football away days and seaside and being chased, All England wasn't like that.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2014
    3 people like this.
  10. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Interesting recollections Oneflewover
     
  11. Sirryacus

    Sirryacus Senior member

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    What did you Brits make of the classic movie American Graffiti? Believe it or not its about my Hometown in the 60's yes I was born in the same city as George Lucas.
     
  12. flyfronted

    flyfronted Senior member

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    Was a huge influence on the post Suedehead scene - Soulboy .
    practically every funk lovin kid in london started wearing vintage bowling shirts , 50's style jeans and slip on plimsoles .
     
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  13. flyfronted

    flyfronted Senior member

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    sadly the need was financial - 11 year olds couldnt work and if they did the cash would have gone to there mums to pay the rent .. tough times in 69 . The idea my mum could have afford a pair of DMs for a 11 year old was just not a option .
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2014
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  14. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    Agreed Brownie.The style was about for just a relatively short time in a small Country,yet we have so many regionally different experiences,and different memories.Much has been discussed,but through reading snippets from other people,it acts as a catalyst and opens up so much more.
    Markets have been a continuous link in my lifetime.Cafes also,but unfortunately so few are now independent.i think everyone agrees that the adoption of the "Mall" killed so many Villages and Towns and stifled the independent trader.it's almost unfathomable to think that Pizza was an exotic food back then and that trips abroad (to Belfast !! ) was the most exciting thing imaginable.Squires Gate was my Heathrow.
    I was listening to TalkSport the other day and someone has set up meetings for ex sportsmen suffering from Alzheimer's etc. and how they use triggers from their past ,to induce memories,and the pleasure it brings.I would like to see a group of Men of a certain age blindfolded ,have a bottle of Brut and Youth Dew wafted under their noses and ask them to record their recollections.:)
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. Lasttye

    Lasttye Senior member

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    One of the great films on teenagers, still often watch it,
     
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  16. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    It provided with more width to the Wardfobe :)Shops like Flips were opening up and selling American Clothing so you could go and get your wardrobe-without breaking the Bank.My favourite one was in Curtain Road but Greenwich was pretty good as well.
     
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  17. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Sometimes I read Journalists and I wonder what Planet they have come from.The latest piece of crap journalism reads(and I quote)"London is more vibrant now than it was 30 years ago".It goes on to state the late night Bars and Restuarants as an example.So wtf did we do then,during the 60s! True there was no binge drinking then or stupid bastards spread out on the pavement pissed out of their boxes-no Pub customers totally blocking the Pavement-so you have to walk in the road.Ok you did not have All Night Buses then but what you have now is the great unwashed using them and you cannot get on anywhere "Upwest".Central London is a cesspit.


    Rant over :slayer:
     
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  18. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    That clarifies just what I am saying.Your experience was so very different.Even more so,because there was a perception that everyone down in London had everything.
    We were Working Holidays and some w/e on the local farms,picking cabbages at 12.i worked for a Greek Cypriot in his Chip shop during my school lunch break and then after school at 4pm.
    I don't know of any of us giving our parents any of the money we earned until we had left school and started full time jobs.Thankfully it was not such a lean time for us as you experienced.I bet that we were equally just as happy at that time though.?
    The fact that you couldn't afford gear and being aware of what was around though remains the point.
     
  19. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    Flip Machine were responsible for a lot of Soul Boys in Bowling Shirts......
     
    1 person likes this.
  20. Oneflewover

    Oneflewover Well-Known Member

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    You should take the opportunity to watch and compare/contrast "That'll Be The Day" or maybe "Gregory's Girl" British takes on a similar age groups.

    American Graffiti is a great favourite of mine.
     
    1 person likes this.

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