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Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Exactly,when you throw buying Records into that mix I went quite a few days staying in :)
     
  2. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Had my all Suits made in Alexandras(Guildford) around `69/`70,did not think anybody else remembered those Tailors.
     
  3. Bob the Badger

    Bob the Badger Senior member

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    We used the Romford branch for Prince of Wales Suits and Jackets. They seemed to have particularly good patterns for POW.
     
  4. Bob the Badger

    Bob the Badger Senior member

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    I forgot. Alexandra were also good for Dogtooth/Houndstooth patterns.
     
  5. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Yes,bought a Dogtooth MTM from them-but it was mostly the 3Ply Mohair from them-they always had loads of Swatches to choose from.
     
  6. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    That was a Jacket,never really liked the Dogtooth Suit- well then anyway.
     
  7. Mr Knightley

    Mr Knightley Senior member

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    Yes I was just coming up to 15 when my dad took me to John Collier for my first MTM suit. I chose the style, he the cloth! Navy self herringbone and very good value it was.

    [​IMG]

    I've shown this before but I wanted to address the 'old man' issue. Rather safe though my suit is, my dad considered its high button stance and narrow trousers very racy!
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2014
  8. ThinkSmart

    ThinkSmart Member

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    The harrington style of jacket predates the 60s by quite a long way, originating in the late 30s thought I've never seen one that old. It was in films by James Dean and Elvis in the 50, only picked up in UK in the early 1960s as you say. Golden Bear gets a mention, good make. Those Orvis ones are great too, seriously good. In a circle completing itself..... John Simons now sells a Harrington of their own that is haf the price of the new Baracuta ones. Right, that's the last time I'll post on harringtons.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2014
  9. yankmod

    yankmod Senior member

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    Yes Brooks Brothers created the Button Down.The UK was playing Polo in the 1820's and the US 1860's.Again, the Americans defining their "Upper Class" by taking their lead from the British Upper Class.
     
  10. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    F*ck me! Am I the only ex - skinhead on here?!?! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2014
  11. Botolph

    Botolph Senior member

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    Oh it definitely is like that. Take Polo Ralph Lauren. I know that in the UK and some of Europe, it's a highly-regarded label in casual and football circles. While I admittedly own a few choice pieces, it's up there with The North Face and those horrible 'Afflicted' allover-print t-shirts as far as ubiquity here. Every Tom, Dick, and Harry owns at least one RL polo shirt. Barbour is definitely a semi-'exclusive' brand here, right now though it's big with students and hipsters. I personally love my waxed sage green Barbour Bedale-- great for walking the dog down the Castle Island area.

    I have NOT seen the Golden Bear harringtons and have had to hold back my purchasing trigger finger a few times... they look very well-made.


    I have a question: With this talk of made-to-measure and bespoke suits that many 14-year-olds sported back in the 'era', what would a young man's suit have costed in today's money? Would the price compare to today's prices, and if so-- why? Was there more demand for suiting and thus more tailor shops? It just amazes me that young men would be able to afford a bespoke suit or three working on building sites, grocery stores, etc.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2014
  12. cerneabbas

    cerneabbas Senior member

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    I think that its the same here some American brands are well regarded ( Alden,Allen Edmonds,Brooks Brothers etc ) and because you rarely see people wearing them there is a bit of an "exclusive" element.
    I have been looking at the Herring Grassmere ( by Cheaney) V the Allen Edmonds Macneil,both a similar last,comparible quality,the obvious thing to do for me would be to buy the easily available British one,why even think twice? I suppose its just wanting something a bit different ?.

    I cant answer all of your question but I do have a couple of comments,there was a lot more people wearing suits here in the late 60s,a lot of places had a dress code,definitely a lot more tailors big companies and lots of one man in a tiny shop outfits,you didn't have to pay the full price at once you could pay weekly.
    I read somewhere ( Modculture ? ) a while back that Liverpool has 4 tailors in the city and they are all in their 60s,when they are gone that's it over,I am guessing that its a similar story elsewhere around the country,the old guys retire and because there is no demand the trade gradually dies out,its a shame.
     
  13. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Going by myself I used to pay £15/18 for a plain colour,2 Piece Mohair Mix Suit(in `69).These I would wear to work,after having them a while.I worked in a Shoe Shop.The same Suit would cost you £600/800 plus today.My 3 Ply Mohair Suits,2 Piece, would be £25.In todays terms I would say over £1,500 if not more.They were all MTM and I would pay off 10/-(Ten Shillings)a week.There were more Tailor Shops about,and when one Suit was nearly paid for,I would receive a letter asking if I would like to get another Suit.I never had problems with my Suits in any shape or form.They went by the same Measurements and they always fitted.Suits were still important.I was a Trainee Manager(who sometimes took over a Shop),I had to wear a Suit.When you went for Interviews Suits were considered the norm-plus you felt better going out in a Suit. :)
     
    2 people like this.
  14. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    I mentioned Golden Bear a long way back.They have made everything from Lettermen/Cheerleader/Golf jackets etc for years.My connection with them was because they supplied J.Simon with his leather "Harringtons" at one time.
    I know what you mean about the British and American styles bouncing around.Years ago the Milanese adopted the Navy Barbour as their uniform ( when the English would only choose green ),but would pair it with Brown Brogues , 501's etc giving a distinct preppy look rather than the Cirencester/Sloane image.
    The whole Barbour motorcycle "Look" that has popularized the Barbour Steve McQueen jacket in recent years was kick started by a shop owner in Westbourne Grove about 10 or 12 years ago.(Nick Ashley,son of Laura Ashley.)
    Here's an interview with him: http://www.keikari.com/english/interview-with-nick-ashley-from-private-white/)
    It was then copied by RL,Edwin and countless others.I think he actually went bust as he was way ahead of his time IMO.
     
  15. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    Interesting that you were aware of Ivy at that time Bob.I had no idea about it as a Style or Institution until I worked in America,post ' 76.I still wore Bass/501's/Lacoste etc when I needed to look semi conservative smart and an American workmate called me Preppy,which was a new expression to me.
     
  16. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I would have thought 'Bikers' too. I met one young bloke at a party who remarked on my gear and said "I'm a Hell's Angel... when I'm dressed up." I took him to task about that, saying as I understood it being a Hell's Angel was a whole lifestyle thing, not a weekend fashion.
     
  17. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I can remember the first person I saw in S E London wearing a Harrington was a bloke waiting to get in to the Savoy Rooms in Catford. He was a cocky sod with red hair, and he really reckoned himself (he was also one of the first around that area to get out of the look in 1970, proclaiming "Reggae's all the same!"). His jacket was dark blue. It was shortly after that that I got one myself - mine was green, like on Mr Knightley's avatar.
     
  18. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Well, it all depends what you mean! :D

    Don't forget that 'skinhead' was, in the beginning' a name used by others to describe 'us'. I can remember writing in Yell in 1969 "People call us skinheads - we don't call ourselves anything." To an extent that was entirely true. When I arrived in London in 1968, the kids around my way who looked like late mods in boots and liked the same kind of music didn't call themselves anything; greasers called us 'skinheads'. By the time the look had developed, the newspapers had got hold of the 'skinhead' tag, and a lot of younger kids had come into the scene, the name became more a matter of fact. I've said this before - I didn't really change that much in the way I followed fashion in clothes and music between late 67 and early 70, I didn't feel different, I didn't behave differently, I didn't suddenly decide to change my 'look' radically, I didn't suddenly decide to get into football violence and 'p*ki-bashing' (in fact I never did the latter, it seemed pointless to me). So if society called me 'skinhead' I didn't really mind and simply adopted the name. It filled a void, it gave us a sense of collective identity.
     
  19. ThinkSmart

    ThinkSmart Member

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    I find the pre-Skinhead Peanut look interesting, taking away the foppish tendencies emerging in Mod and going back to basics as Eric Clapton in the latter part of his time with The Yardbirds wearing a harrington, loafers, knit polos.
     
  20. Bob the Badger

    Bob the Badger Senior member

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    This sums up nicely my thinking. Ironically by the time we accepted and used the term Skinhead in about 1970 we had started to grow our hair. I saw plenty of fighting between like minded kids but I never saw p*ki bashing. The Media had a lot to answer for. No doubt it went on but not in our crowd.The sense of collective identity was special.
     

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