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Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. covskin

    covskin Senior member

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    My first post on the old blokes thread lol, a photo of some genuine circa 1970 sunglasses bought by my parents, borrowed and worn by me later on in my late teens.

    [​IMG]

    Knew I had these somewhere. I was just a little skinhead myself in 1970.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. covskin

    covskin Senior member

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    While I am over here, a 50s/60s rayon and wool(?) scarf I borrowed from my dad in my late teens. Makers label says Hico.

    [​IMG]
     
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  3. Botolph

    Botolph Senior member

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    Cool stuff, CovSkin!
     
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  4. Mr Knightley

    Mr Knightley Senior member

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    Quote:I think that's true mate. I shopped in the Ivy Shop and Squire Shop and liked what I saw (most of it) without really thinking too much about where it came from. I did follow US golfers and their style and recall we attempted to recreate their matching knitwear / shirt and sock look, often in pastel shades, but that's not really Ivy either. I believe we sought a particular look that took cues from Ivy, continental and the 'English Gent' wardrobes. But that is just me being smart with the benefit of hindsight and this thread. I have to say I know more about the look as a result of this thread than I ever did at the time!
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2014
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  5. Mr Knightley

    Mr Knightley Senior member

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    Quote:

    I think that's true mate.

    I shopped in the Ivy Shop and Squire Shop and liked what I saw (most of it) without really thinking too much about where it came from. I did follow US golfers and their style and recall we attempted to recreate their matching knitwear / shirt and sock look, often in pastel shades, but that's not really Ivy either. I believe we sought a particular look that took cues from Ivy, continental and the 'English Gent' wardrobes. But that is just me being smart with the benefit of hindsight and this thread. I have to say I know more about the look as a result of this thread than I ever did at the time!

    By way of example of the mix, in 1969 I worked for a time in an old fashioned menswear department in the local Department Store, JG Bond Ltd (still there but now Debenhams!). Skins or suedes would learn that we had just taken delivery of some new Wolsey v and crew necks in lovely marled knits - petrol blue and lovat green were the most sought after. These were certainly 'old man' gear but became an absolute must-have to the extent people were actually nicking them! But why were they suddenly the thing? There was a very strong sense I believe that everything had to have an 'authentic' feel. That was more important, as we became better off, than following an Ivy or any other theme. So, shoes would have an Ivy influence - Royal brogues, plains and gibsons and shirts too, but suits were an update of Mod and hence continental in inspiration and knitwear, ties, pocket hankies, odd trousers in POW or dogtooth, all quintessentially English.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2014
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  6. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    What to me is ironic, is the fact that some of what we perceived as American Ivy was in actual fact either originally produced over here or known for their "Englishness".Royal Brogues were either known as "Longwings" or "English" Brogue- in America.Simons sold us the idea that we were buying "American Classics" in the Ivy Shop,hence the name,it was advertised as such(originally).The B.D. was certainly an American invention.but some Shirts were produced over here,in East London.I just thought that it looked smart,I was not really interested whether it was being worn in top notch Universities,Stateside.It suited my tastes at the time.:) As M-o-M has said,we are going around in circles now.
     
  7. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    Last edited: Apr 1, 2014
  8. Inks

    Inks Senior member

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    [​IMG]
    The main difference between Hard-Mods and Skinheads wasn't the clothes. It was the mode of transport.
     
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  9. con man

    con man Senior member

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    I bought a button down from them last year, I wanted one in red, I ordered it online, but the next day they rang me to say the didn't stock that colour any more. This annoyed me slightly, why show it on the website if they don't do them anymore, but was pleased they had bothered to phone me other than e-mail, which I thought was good customer service.. They asked if I would like to change the colour and did so, to an aubergine/ purple (The one in my avatar photo).....they said they would ship it straight away and lo and behold, it arrived the next day.
    the shirt is 100% cotton and whilst it's got a good feel and look and quality, it creases like a bastard, though irons out easily.
    nice looking shirt, nice fit and a good price but can only be worn under a suit jacket, blazer or jumper unless you don't mind wearing it on it's own and looking like you went to bed in it.
    they do some nice looking suits, I,m currently tinkering with the idea of a pow or a bottle green tonic suit, from them, but not sure about buying a suit online......
    so to summarise, good customer service, good quality clothing and decent prices...............first time I wore it, was driving home at 3am after a wedding on a dual carriageway , and hit a herd of cows at around 60mph, serious accident, car on fire, cow embedded in the windscreen.......shirt intact, haha!!!
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2014
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  10. yankmod

    yankmod Senior member

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    Ivy League style was an American attempt to mimic British School Uniforms in the first place.With modifications of course,like the BD.Polo did appear in the UK before the US of A.
     
  11. Inks

    Inks Senior member

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    I lived in the Lake George/Glens Falls NY area for a while back in the early 1990s. I once went to Albany to shop. But, going to Buffalo from Glens Falls(for a European anyway) would be the equivalent of travelling from London to Rome to buy a pair of decent trousers. I did purchase a 1960 10k Herff Jones class-ring from a Clinton Mass pawnbroker for next to nothing though.[​IMG]
    Quite Ivy looking.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2014
  12. Inks

    Inks Senior member

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    The cheap £13 Oxford BDs what I bought last week. No back pleat, or hoop. No back collar button either. But a generous cut size-wise (but not in collar. If you're a fat-neck, get a size up)and nice stitching [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    And no, I don't work for these guys.
     
  13. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    I was encouraged by this post browniecj (and those by Mr. Knightly) - at times since joining this forum I have felt that whilst I was roaming the streets in turned up Levi's and boots everyone south of Luton must have been walking around attired like a resident of Omega House - a look I would not have associated with 'Skinhead' at all - I never saw anyone dressed that way at that time. As a skinhead I believed I was following a British fashion, created by British youth. (in truth I thought it was more than just a fashion). Of course, in 1971 (in our area) the look had changed to more of that American College boy style, not that any of us were aware of that influence at the time. I can see by your post that what you were interested in was looking good without trying to emulate any other particular style - I can relate to that.
     
  14. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I remember when a mate of mine turned up in a shirt I hadn't seen before, and said to me "It's American - not a Ben Sherman - from the Squire Shop", and I was down there getting a similar shirt the very next day, so that I could say "It's American, not a Ben Sherman" too.

    But overall, I would think many of us would agree with your last statement there.
     
  15. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I HAVE to get one!
     
  16. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    In my opinion there's only one place you should wear Fair Isle jumpers.
     
  17. cerneabbas

    cerneabbas Senior member

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    I agree with that ( maybe you should have said south east of Luton ) and with what Mr Knightley and browniecj have said,I used to look at Americans on tv and like their BD shirts etc but I didn't think that styles here were copying them ( but in truth they must have been influenced by them),I thought that Harringtons were an American invention then,and yes Mr Knightley is right I have learnt much more about it from this thread.
     
  18. cerneabbas

    cerneabbas Senior member

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    In 1969/70 ? ( outside of London).
     
  19. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    loempiavreter - I think we all acknowledge that the Ivy League style was an influence on the Mod/Skinhead/Suedehead look being more or less influential at certain times. I'm not from London so maybe other members can comment more accurately than I on your statement about skinheads shopping a lot at John Simon's shop. My gut reaction is that some skinheads shopped there, sometimes. If every skinhead in London had shopped there 'a lot' then there would have been a queue 4 deep a quarter of a mile long outside all day every Saturday! It's probably truer to say that some (probably the older, more clued up) skinheads were regular customers. At the time of the 'originals' most skinheads were aged between 14 and 18, many were still at school and couldn't have afforded to shop there often. What was that quote I heard on a clip about an Ivy League shop in the USA? "It's not for everyone, we cater for the highest common denominator"

    Whilst we are all guilty of looking back with rose tinted glasses I do think there are some who are style revisionists who like to make out that everyone was walking around in sharp MTM suits, bespoke shirts and shoes that cost 3 weeks wages - the reality was quite different - many of us were happy to be able to buy whatever was currently on trend in youth fashion shops and anywhere else we could find and afford it and I have been really encouraged by recent posts from some of the more senior members.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2014
  20. cerneabbas

    cerneabbas Senior member

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    Again that's how I see it ( although I was a bit younger ),we wanted what we saw the slightly older lads wearing,Pressure_Drop and his mates for instance,and they only had part time jobs because they were still at school.
    The older blokes who were working had MTM suits ( and scooters),I have been wondering how they would have referred to themselves,maybe they still thought of themselves as Mods ?.
     

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