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Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. Mr Knightley

    Mr Knightley Senior member

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    I just thought I might try a slightly different tack given that it is the festive season.

    My recollection from the late 60s is that there was no particular requirement as a skinhead to ‘dress up’ for the festive season, at least not in the way that has become more fashionable since. When going out in the evening, whether to Ilford Palais or somewhere locally, I don’t recall feeling a need to depart from my normal evening wear – the suit, the BD and tie, Royals, etc. There was never a concept among us of an ‘evening suit’ as such. Or did we feel 'above fashion'?

    Today, and perhaps surprisingly given the increasing trend towards informality, I see many shops aimed at the young man promoting a slim lapel suit that could only be worn in the evening with its slightly fussy detail and, dare I say, a bit of glitter going on. I was in a reasonably upmarket shop in Lakeside last week (albeit one that is famed for its casual wear) and noted a new formality there - velvet jackets, bow ties as well as Vivienne Westwood velvet evening slippers being shown alongside designer trainers by Maison Martin Margiela, for example, with perhaps a patent leather toe or other detail.

    So, just interested really in whether there was a trend back then, that I missed, to dress more formally around the festive season and also what fellow originals do today.
     
  2. catchourbreath

    catchourbreath Well-Known Member

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    Is that where those drawings are from ? Maybe I missed the post.
     
  3. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    I bought tkts for a friend of mine to see Tony Joe White in Clapham some years back,as he had never heard of him.he's a big Creedance fan,so I was sure he would enjoy him.He said it was one of the best gigs he'd ever been to.

    As I have mentioned previously ,there were a number of questionable sounds played in the day.A few that jump out at me are:

    Afternoon of the Rhino - Mike Post Coalition

    Bert's Apple Crumble - The Quick

    Bugglegum Breakthrough - Mike Post Coalition
     
  4. con man

    con man Senior member

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    Talking of Manchester clubs, has anyone heard of a club called The Place or Placemate, I think it would of been on Whitworth Street, the same as The Twisted Wheel, the blokes who owned/ran it, opened a sister club in Stoke on Trent in 1963, also called The Place, which is said to be the first Discotheque in the Uk (how true that is, I don't know)
     
  5. elwood

    elwood Senior member

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    Placemate 7 was in the venue that had been The Twisted Wheel. I went there only once in about 77 or 78 so I couldn't say a lot about it. From what I remember the music was the usual disco stuff of the period. I don't recall it having any particular soul/ Northern reputation but as I say I only went there once so can't speak with any authority.

    Can't comment on the Stoke or first UK discotheque connections.
     
  6. Sirryacus

    Sirryacus Senior member

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    I dared to look up those abominations and numerous people seem to be mentioning those songs in relation to The Wigan Casino? I remember that club being mentioned here before.
     
  7. Botolph

    Botolph Senior member

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    To be fair, the Quick were a great California power pop band. Defo not Soul though!
     
  8. Sirryacus

    Sirryacus Senior member

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    I don't care what genre it was I didn't like it.
     
  9. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    TBH I have no idea about The Quick .(then or now?).
    I do know that I heard all of the tracks played regularly in the Midlands long before The Casino opened.Sorry to digress,but again,a lot of what was deemed to be Casino classics etc. we're we'll known before.
    Maybe listening to the likes of The Quick,The Markets,Jimmy McCracklin etc. was a blessing in disguise, as I opened my ears to almost everything after that !

    Did anyone else sing " I 'it a Mick" to Desmond Decker ?
     
  10. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Too many 2nd generation Irish lads in our social circle. That version never occurred to us.
     
  11. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Yes it was.By early `70 I had stopped going to the Jamaican Reggae Shops,too much was coming out that I did not like(I still dislike those Tunes today-along with the "Skinhead"Records).One thing has changed from those days.About `69/`70 you had the first of the "Dj" Sounds starting to emerge.To start with you had older Classics,with Djs(Selectors) "Toasting" over them.At the time I hated it,but a few years later I picked up 2 Trojan Compilations "Versions Galore-Vols.2 and 3" from a 2nd hand Shop.There are some good Tracks on it,I include a couple of "Dj" Versions in my Set now.Another thing is,I go more for the "Revival" side of Reggae(Records that came out `71 to `75,my choice)that Skinheads or Suedeheads never caught on to-but older Jamaicans love to hear.The Dj(Mr.Biggs),who have I now worked with.has put me on to some fantastic 45s. :)
     
  12. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Sorry about my last "Post"-my English is getting dreadful !!!!!
     
  13. Sirryacus

    Sirryacus Senior member

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    By Skinhead records do you mean stuff such as Skinhead Moonstomp by Symarip etc?
     
  14. Clouseau

    Clouseau Senior member

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  15. Botolph

    Botolph Senior member

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    Alright, simmer down now! [​IMG] Different band. They were talking about the QUIK, I was on about the QUICK from California. I was surprised to say the least to see the name on the list above.



    Now, by the "Revival" side of Reggae, what exactly do you mean? Could you provide a top 5 of this stuff? Not taking the piss here, seriously interested.
    So did the skinhead set not get into this stuff as a whole because they'd moved on to other stuff like the Faces, Glam/Glitter, etc.? Or was it an ideological sort of clash?
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2013
  16. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    That was the start,then Tunes like "Skinhead Train" and,"Skinhead A Bash Em"to name a couple.



    Skinheads went more for the gimmicky kind of Records-"Return Of Django","5 To 5","You Can Get It If You Really Want" and others,.Whereas the Jamaicans(outside of the Youth-who were going more towards Roots),there were the beginnings of "Lovers",where it became more soulful.The early Dennis Browns`,Gregory Isaacs etc.show this off.There is not a top 5 like the Skinhead Tunes but go on any Reggae Shop(in the U.K)and they will give you a clue.As I said before it was `71 onwards so Suedeheads were looking towards Soul and early Funk more.The other Groups you talk about came later.
     
  17. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    One of my favourite Dj(who includes "Revival" in his Set,is Gladdy Wax(someone I saw at Margate( last year).
     
  18. Oneflewover

    Oneflewover Well-Known Member

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    Called the "shaggy dog" in Hull
     
  19. Studio1st

    Studio1st Member

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    Botolph,

    It's tricky defining 'revival' reggae exactly as it can mean all things to all people.

    It's most commonly used to describe music from 1959/60 up to 79/80 just before the change to 'dancehall' rhythms. Within this timeframe you can find loads of sub-genres and individual small scenes with preferences for certain styles - at a guess what Browniecj might be particularly refering to is the non 'roots' Jamaican vocal tunes from the 71-75 period of which there are literally thousands.

    Many are brilliant and appeal accross the board to roots fans, lovers fans and old timers alike, some are definitely on a more sugary, sentimental side beloved of older West Indians and often called 'big peoples music' (try Barry Biggs for instance). Jamaicans have always produced love songs and this continued beyond the 'skinhead' time frame and pre-date what is strictly termed 'lovers' (i.e uk produced lovers vocals from the second half of the seventies).

    The reggae scene in England in the early 70s began to fracture a bit, younger kids wanted the emeging new harder, experimental sounds of roots, dub and deejays on the one hand, a more mature crowd often wanted more of the vocals and what would later be termed 'lovers' sounds - and Trojan continually attempted to achieve chart success with endless 'pop reggae' (most of which are abysmal and helped bankrupt the company). Few artists actually confined themselves to one style and usually recorded all kinds of music and many sounds would play accross the range of styles (In fact many sounds would also run some soul/funk tunes in a dance). Its really mid/later 70s onwards that specifically 'roots' sounds started to really make a seperate scene based around 'hard' sounds (with the specific lovers sounds starting but the majority still playing a bit of eveything).

    Given the musical options available I get a bit irritated by the received skinhead wisdom that 'the music went shit after 70/71/72' or 'became all about rasta' - I'm more than happy to hear that an individual didnt like it as much after that point but it most certainly didnt 'turn shit' (thats not aimed at anyone here just is something i used to hear said a lot). Anyone that wilfully ignores any music after a given date because the clothes they like were no longer worn is a complete knob in my very humble! (again not directed at anyone here and i cant find the smileys right now).

    It's always a matter of dispute how much skins were into reggae (and of course where you were). I wasnt born then so cant give a personal view but it seems safe to say (trying to make this post of some general relevance to the main topic) it was anything from a range of: didnt listen to it/was just the big hits/was the main soundtrack/was a complete obsession that outlasted the fashion.

    Anyway here's some early seventies classic 'revival' vocals try these (very definitely NOT a top 5 btw, just a couple as they occur to me over a lunch hour):

    4 Jamaican:
    Tennors 'Weather Report' (Tennors lead by the fabulous Ronnie Davis)

    Ronnie Davis 'Lady Love'

    Freddy McKay 'Our Rendezvous'

    Dennis Brown 'Baby dont do it'

    1 English:
    Jackie Edwards 'I do Love You' (and also try the flip 'Who told you so')

    p.s Gladdy Wax is great and can be seen and heard on his sound for free at Notting Hill each year on the corner of Portobello Rd and Golbourne Road
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2013
  20. Botolph

    Botolph Senior member

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    Studio1st, thanks for that post! Well-written, and informative.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2013

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