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Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Interesting read Ed.

    Like the bit about it became diluted,in London,and everybody went to High Street Shops(hmmmm spoken like a true Mancurian :)).As we have seen,not entirely true.One thing I do believe in was-Manchester was not as diverse in their music tastes,as say Liverpool or London etc.Hardly any Ska was played at the Twisted Wheel,also some of their Playlist was more commercial later in the 60s and yet in Liverpool there was the "Sink" Club( where the true Mods went-not the "Cavern")which spun Soul and Ska etc.,side by side.The first "Wheel" in Brazennosse Street had mainly White Groups there(Spencer Davis Group were one of the first to play in the new Club in Whitmore Street).

    Am I correctin this M-o-M ??
     
  2. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Whoops !!!! meant Mancunian....:)
     
  3. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Oh boy! You got that right! :D
     
  4. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I'll do my best, I promise.

    BTW I don't regard it as 'my' book.
     
  5. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I don't recall hearing anything but Soul at the Wheel in Manchester. I didn't hear any Ska at the Blackpool branch of the Twisted Wheel* either, unless I specifically asked the DJ to play some (which at least shows he had some in his box). Blackpool Mecca on Sundays (?) was 100% Soul. But I must have been hearing West Indian stuff somewhere, because I scoured the shops for it - mainly 'Smoky Joe's' in Blackpool, where I picked up stuff by Tommy McCook etc. - this was the main reason I headed straight for the West Indian record shops when I moved to London, I already had a taste for it.

    I never went to any Liverpool clubs, so I can't comment.


    *I have always wondered about the Twisted Wheel in Blackpool. I had always assumed it was a branch of the Manchester club - I seem to recall having a membership card with the familiar wheel logo - but it could easily have been a totally separate entity cashing in on the name. Somebody on here will know the answer... oh, Wikipedia says it was 'under the same ownership', just seen that.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2013
  6. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    The Blackpool "Wheel" was run by the younger Abadi Brothers(Ronald and Richard)-according to Keith Rylatt in "Central 1179".

    I can only go by what some exMods from Liverpool have told me.It seems Manchester would get their Records via the Liverpool Docks.Probably it was down to the Manchester "Music Policy" then-as you heard Jamaican Sounds in Blackpool,M-o-M.As for the more main stream Records I see they were spun in the "Early Doors" Sessions at the "Wheel".
     
  7. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I get the distinct impression that they wouldn't have bothered to play WI music if I hadn't asked. I'm remembering in particular a visit I made in summer 69, with a girlfriend from college (one of my very few birds from college - she happened to be a mod from Southampton).
     
  8. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    It is strange that they had the tunes in the box,but would not have bothered playing them.Any Clubs that I went to(besides Jamaican Clubs),Reggae etc.was played alongside other styles-without anybody having to ask for it.
     
  9. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    Little Queenie, I found this a really surprising fact. On what basis were they lampooned? When first buying that book many, many years ago I thought that the drawings were very good (probably the best thing in it, actually). Whilst they didn't fit exactly into the time-scale I would have given and some of the clothes not so widely worn in our area, I just put this down to the old 'time/space continuum' whereby styles changed slightly from region to region and over different periods. The only slight criticism I would have is that the jeans depicted were shorter than I saw worn at the time, generally speaking. (again, could be regional differences?)
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2013
  10. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    Quote:
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2013
  11. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I have the impression they were just part of that particular DJ's collection and he toted them in case anyone asked. There was nothing all that esoteric about the records - if I'd asked for anything out of the ordinary I doubt if he would have had it.
     
  12. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    See, I don't think they were particularly lampooned. They were controversial, but that's a different matter. As regards draughtsmanship they're bloody good.
     
  13. Bob the Badger

    Bob the Badger Senior member

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    If the drawing is meant to be from 1970 then surely that time would have been more suedehead than skinhead? Where are the Royals, brogues,bass weejuns? Are they covered by other drawings?I never wore a t-shirt then. The boots are too high. My crew wore 6/7 eyelet boots, when we wore them.etc
     
  14. Clouseau

    Clouseau Senior member

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    Bob, there are four different drawings (and smaller sketches in the text) that have been posted numerous times. Not everything was covered of course. These drawings were quite inspirational (for foreigners like me at least), even if not perfect and not totally historically accurate. Like Buttons said in a precedent post, the text going with the drawings (not the rest of the book) was rather good too, but only a piece of a larger puzzle. The lower boots with a white trim for example are mentioned in the text.
    On a side note, i'm quite sure i saw in the eighties another book in english (cheap style paperback) covering numerous fashion styles in drawings, notably mods and skinheads. The style was not as good, but it was rather interesting.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2013
  15. Little Queenie

    Little Queenie Senior member

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    I've already told you that.. are you becoming forgetful, Mr. M?!
     
  16. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Bob they are supposed to be from `68/`69,the Page `70 had the Royals and with `70/`71 the Solatios,Royals and Loafers were shown.I thought the Drawings were good(I cannot draw a thing),I just questioned some of the Clothes depicted.I now know they were worn in other parts.A "T"Shirt was worn underneath a Sleeveless Pullover around `68,along with Greens etc.

    There was another Book out with Skinhead Fashion Pictures in it(I remember looking at the Book in Virgin Record Store)this would have been about the 80s.There were actual Photos as well as Drawings.I wished I had gone back and bought it.
     
  17. elwood

    elwood Senior member

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    Falling behind again this last week or so ... agree with all your points, roytonboy. And I like the idea of the sky blue berets ... not sure they'll catch on now though [​IMG]

    On the driving gloves, I know there have been plenty of comments about the origin and demise of the look. Obviously there have been plenty of "pop stars" who adopted a similar style from Gene Vincent (a rocker, I know) onwards ... I seem to remember seeing Wayne Fontana (a Manchester lad) wearing them on Top of the Pops Christmas special in about 1965 - had it already become a Mod accessory in Manchester by then?
     
  18. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    browniecj - you are correct in your assertion that Soul was the predominant music of choice in and around Manchester,however, this was not exclusively the case. You have referred to the book 'CENtral 1179' and this pricked my curiosity as I would have expected as least some ska/reggae to have featured at The Twisted Wheel, as when I started to go out to clubs some (admittedly a small minority) was played. Looking through the Whitworth Street playlist in the book, entitled, "Just A Few Of The Many", a couple of tracks are included - Phoenix City(Roland Alphonso) and Gun Of Navarone (Skatalites), no doubt both very well known to you at the time. As these are on the list they were probably played quite regularly and it's my bet that some others were also played. In terms of live acts, the book tells us that Jimmy Cliff played there, as did Harry J and the All Stars. I recall at the time a short news item on 'North West Tonight' which was reporting on black and white youths getting on in Moss Side. It captured my attention as some of the lads were familiar to me from the terraces at Manchester City - there they were in a local youth club being interviewed with Reggae playing in the background. The 'Wheel' started off as a Rhythm & Blues venue and evolved into a Soul Club - that's why people went there. I would imagine that outside of London there was a correlation between the proximity of a West Indian community and the amount of Reggae played. Only 2 West Indian kids in the whole of my first secondary school gives an indication of our local community - very little Reggae played by us (I remember 'Al Capone' by Prince Buster was one of a very few regularly played at the local Soul club) except for the well known stuff that made the charts, which tended to feature in local youth clubs. I also remember listening to 'Wet Dream' and 'Big Five' in a mate's house as his older brother had them. I don't know if you agree, but by 1971 some of the 'Reggae' that was being put out was little more than pop music and by 1972 most of it was dreadful. I vividly recall some unfortunate requesting "Johnny Reggae"* at the Soul Club in Shaw one night and the DJ going bonkers - in fact he turned into my Dad, yelling "They'll be having bloody chimpanzees on that Top Of The Pops next!"

    * Yes, I know that "Johnny Reggae" wasn't really a reggae record, I'm just using that as an example of how commercialism had got hold of the whole thing - let's face it, "Suzanne Beware Of The Devil" wasn't much better (IMHO!)
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2013
  19. elwood

    elwood Senior member

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    That's just jolted the memory banks ... the first single I bought was The Four Tops' "Reach Out I'll Be There". My Dad mentioned it to a young lad he worked with - probably late teens I suppose - who told him that if I liked that sort of music, he'd send along some of his records for me to listen to. Lo and behold, my Dad turned up with a pile of Stax singles with the blue label. I'm thinking now that, with that sort of taste, the young colleague could well have been a regular at the Twisted Wheel - just my conjecture. Anyway, I can't remember for the life of me what was in the pile of discs and there were too many of them for me to be allowed time to play them on the family record player more than once before they were returned. I certainly can't remember them making an impression on me so they were pretty much wasted on me then. I'm sure I'd have appreciated them more later.
     
  20. elwood

    elwood Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    Not sure if we've had this on here before ... caption simply says "Skinhead girls at 'The Room at the Top', Ilford" (a venue which I think has been mentioned on here a few times?). It's a Daily Express photo but there's no date given. To my eyes it looks 80s revival - anyone know any more?
     

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