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Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. Ikouja

    Ikouja Well-Known Member

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    Actually I always listened to all kinds of music. It comes of having a dad who played in the RAF Wooton Bassett Dance Band in WW2 and belonged to "Classics Club" (so Sunday mornings were always something like Mozart). I think the first record he ever bought me was Harry Belafonte's Jamaica Farewell / Banana Boat Song. Dad was also a keen cricketer, and we would both sing Lord Beginner's "Victory Test Match" ("Cricket lovely cricket, at Lords where I saw it...") which is probably my first-remembered calypso.

    I remember one day he came home with armfuls of records he had got from a friend - the friend was a whoesaler and was having a clear-out. There was shedloads of stuff, loads of jazz. I remember finding an EP of the "Modern Jazz Quartet at Music Inn" which was a knock-out!

    My mate next door was a couple of years older than I was, and all of his mates in the early 60s were mods. They half-tolerated me and half took the pi$$ out of me, and I used to break my adolescent heart over their girlfriends! But one thing they did for me was to clue me in to music - they were listening to Muddy Waters and so forth. I couldn't afford to buy the clothes (parents wouldn't let me anyway) but I could afford to buy records, and I came home with loads of stuff on the Pye International R&B label - Howling Wolf, Willie Dixon and stuff like that. I bought Bob Dylan's first album when I was twelve, and I bought "The Country Blues of John Lee Hooker" sometime later. Also when I was 12 I heard this incredible track called "Green Onions" with a guitar solo which was about eight years ahead of its time, and I bought that too. I was already into modern jazz - MJQ, Brubeck, etc - and R&B, and so Booker T and the MGs got me hooked on soul.

    There was a record shop in Blackpool where the guy sold jukebox rejects. the shop was just a room with trestle tables in it, and small piles of singles sitting on them. They were cheap, but I picked up loads of weird and wonderful stuff. I remember finding Tommy McCook's "Ska-Ba", and a Jamaican EP of stuff by Millie Small, but also rare mod stuff like "Try It" by The Attack (incidentally, they brought out "Hi Ho Silver Lining" before Jeff Beck ripped it off).

    That takes us to 1967, which is when I actually managed to get some decent clothes, go to the Twisted Wheel, pull birds, etc. All very hard work!

    The rest I have been over a few times on this thread.

    When the skinhead scene fell apart in 1970, I didn't really like much in the way of glam, prog rock, and so on, so I went back into jazz and, thanks to London DJ Charlie Gillet and BBC's John Peel, obscure music from all over the world. Charlie introduced me to Cajun music, for example, and I looked back for old Doo-Wop and R&B tracks. For a few years I even sang traditional folk songs and played a squeeze-box at folk clubs - I just liked MUSIC. My girlfriend had mainstream pop tastes, so I used to treat her to The Carpenters and Gilbert O'Sullivan gigs...

    I guess if I posted a list of all the gigs I have been to (barring classical concerts) the list would amaze you...[​IMG]



    The short answer to that is yes, but it wasn't really till the 1980s (by which time I had moved again to near Liverpool) that I ever went to "Blues Dances" in WI flats.


    Wow, that was great just reading all that! I feel sort of like you, I've been getting into everything, I'll even go to stores and pick up real cheap obscure records, I've found quite a few gems (and quite a good bit of garbage). Reading this thread makes me despise the majority of modern-day Skinheads, they're almost all cut by a cookie-cutter, only listen to oi! and metal, shave their heads and wear band tee-shirts with soccer shoes year round, I feel like I'm in a totally different group...Makes me feel good that the original Skinheads were way cooler than they've become [​IMG]

    PS. No offense to the true blue Skinheads of today (GetSmart to name one) but you are not the majority! [​IMG]
     


  2. browniecj

    browniecj Distinguished Member

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    I hate you. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    I know![​IMG] [​IMG]

    Last year I picked up an Original Pair of Royals(Smooths-Burgundy),from the States.Evidently they had laid in the Wardrobe-for 40 years.Original Soles.Writing and Logo still very visible in the Heel.Almost mint condition.Skinhead History![​IMG]
     


  3. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Distinguished Member

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    I know![​IMG] [​IMG]

    Last year I picked up an Original Pair of Royals(Smooths-Burgundy),from the States.Evidently they had laid in the Wardrobe-for 40 years.Original Soles.Writing and Logo still very visible in the Heel.Almost mint condition.Skinhead History![​IMG]


    You just can't help rubbing it in, can you!
     


  4. Southlondongent

    Southlondongent Senior Member

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    Actually I always listened to all kinds of music. It comes of having a dad who played in the RAF Wooton Bassett Dance Band in WW2 and belonged to "Classics Club" (so Sunday mornings were always something like Mozart). I think the first record he ever bought me was Harry Belafonte's Jamaica Farewell / Banana Boat Song. Dad was also a keen cricketer, and we would both sing Lord Beginner's "Victory Test Match" ("Cricket lovely cricket, at Lords where I saw it...") which is probably my first-remembered calypso.

    I remember one day he came home with armfuls of records he had got from a friend - the friend was a whoesaler and was having a clear-out. There was shedloads of stuff, loads of jazz. I remember finding an EP of the "Modern Jazz Quartet at Music Inn" which was a knock-out!

    My mate next door was a couple of years older than I was, and all of his mates in the early 60s were mods. They half-tolerated me and half took the pi$$ out of me, and I used to break my adolescent heart over their girlfriends! But one thing they did for me was to clue me in to music - they were listening to Muddy Waters and so forth. I couldn't afford to buy the clothes (parents wouldn't let me anyway) but I could afford to buy records, and I came home with loads of stuff on the Pye International R&B label - Howling Wolf, Willie Dixon and stuff like that. I bought Bob Dylan's first album when I was twelve, and I bought "The Country Blues of John Lee Hooker" sometime later. Also when I was 12 I heard this incredible track called "Green Onions" with a guitar solo which was about eight years ahead of its time, and I bought that too. I was already into modern jazz - MJQ, Brubeck, etc - and R&B, and so Booker T and the MGs got me hooked on soul.

    There was a record shop in Blackpool where the guy sold jukebox rejects. the shop was just a room with trestle tables in it, and small piles of singles sitting on them. They were cheap, but I picked up loads of weird and wonderful stuff. I remember finding Tommy McCook's "Ska-Ba", and a Jamaican EP of stuff by Millie Small, but also rare mod stuff like "Try It" by The Attack (incidentally, they brought out "Hi Ho Silver Lining" before Jeff Beck ripped it off).

    That takes us to 1967, which is when I actually managed to get some decent clothes, go to the Twisted Wheel, pull birds, etc. All very hard work!

    The rest I have been over a few times on this thread.

    When the skinhead scene fell apart in 1970, I didn't really like much in the way of glam, prog rock, and so on, so I went back into jazz and, thanks to London DJ Charlie Gillet and BBC's John Peel, obscure music from all over the world. Charlie introduced me to Cajun music, for example, and I looked back for old Doo-Wop and R&B tracks. For a few years I even sang traditional folk songs and played a squeeze-box at folk clubs - I just liked MUSIC. My girlfriend had mainstream pop tastes, so I used to treat her to The Carpenters and Gilbert O'Sullivan gigs...
    .


    Great post! [​IMG]

    and an excuse to post this...

    IMPORTANT NOTICE: No media files are hosted on these forums. By clicking the link below you agree to view content from an external website. We can not be held responsible for the suitability or legality of this material. If the video does not play, wait a minute or try again later. I AGREE

    TIP: to embed Youtube clips, put only the encoded part of the Youtube URL, e.g. eBGIQ7ZuuiU between the tags.
     


  5. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Distinguished Member

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    Great track. It shows why UK DJs at the time used to refer to Blue Beat as "Latin".
     


  6. C3PLOS

    C3PLOS Active Member

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    Actually I always listened to all kinds of music. It comes of having a dad who played in the RAF Wooton Bassett Dance Band in WW2 and belonged to "Classics Club" (so Sunday mornings were always something like Mozart). I think the first record he ever bought me was Harry Belafonte's Jamaica Farewell / Banana Boat Song. Dad was also a keen cricketer, and we would both sing Lord Beginner's "Victory Test Match" ("Cricket lovely cricket, at Lords where I saw it...") which is probably my first-remembered calypso.

    I remember one day he came home with armfuls of records he had got from a friend - the friend was a whoesaler and was having a clear-out. There was shedloads of stuff, loads of jazz. I remember finding an EP of the "Modern Jazz Quartet at Music Inn" which was a knock-out!

    My mate next door was a couple of years older than I was, and all of his mates in the early 60s were mods. They half-tolerated me and half took the pi$$ out of me, and I used to break my adolescent heart over their girlfriends! But one thing they did for me was to clue me in to music - they were listening to Muddy Waters and so forth. I couldn't afford to buy the clothes (parents wouldn't let me anyway) but I could afford to buy records, and I came home with loads of stuff on the Pye International R&B label - Howling Wolf, Willie Dixon and stuff like that. I bought Bob Dylan's first album when I was twelve, and I bought "The Country Blues of John Lee Hooker" sometime later. Also when I was 12 I heard this incredible track called "Green Onions" with a guitar solo which was about eight years ahead of its time, and I bought that too. I was already into modern jazz - MJQ, Brubeck, etc - and R&B, and so Booker T and the MGs got me hooked on soul.

    There was a record shop in Blackpool where the guy sold jukebox rejects. the shop was just a room with trestle tables in it, and small piles of singles sitting on them. They were cheap, but I picked up loads of weird and wonderful stuff. I remember finding Tommy McCook's "Ska-Ba", and a Jamaican EP of stuff by Millie Small, but also rare mod stuff like "Try It" by The Attack (incidentally, they brought out "Hi Ho Silver Lining" before Jeff Beck ripped it off).

    That takes us to 1967, which is when I actually managed to get some decent clothes, go to the Twisted Wheel, pull birds, etc. All very hard work!

    The rest I have been over a few times on this thread.

    When the skinhead scene fell apart in 1970, I didn't really like much in the way of glam, prog rock, and so on, so I went back into jazz and, thanks to London DJ Charlie Gillet and BBC's John Peel, obscure music from all over the world. Charlie introduced me to Cajun music, for example, and I looked back for old Doo-Wop and R&B tracks. For a few years I even sang traditional folk songs and played a squeeze-box at folk clubs - I just liked MUSIC. My girlfriend had mainstream pop tastes, so I used to treat her to The Carpenters and Gilbert O'Sullivan gigs...



    Really dug this post! I'm reading a book right now that I'd highly recommend to you and everyone else: "The King of Carnaby Street: The Life of John Stephen" by Jeremey Reed. A GREAT bio on John Stephen and mod clothing/Carnaby Street in general, with some nice quotes from original Mods. One guy in there mentions that they really weren't that into Ben Sherman shirts because they were knock-offs of American-made shirts which they wanted more due to the detailing. Just a funny thing, I thought.

    Also, there's mention that as far back as the early '60s some Mods wore Dr. Marten boots. Did you ever notice this back then? Personally, I'm not a fan of Dr. Martens, just from a personal Mod asthetic (don't hate me!), but I found this interesting.

    -C
     


  7. Jean-Jacques

    Jean-Jacques Member

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    Very interesting topic, but i read the whole of it and I didn't see a word about Donkey Jackets?
    Many people don't appreciate the PVC shoulders look for sometimes - in cheap stuff... - being too shiny. Do someone have an idea of when it appeared in the skinhead classics? Seems do have come quite late, or am I wrong? Do someone have pictures?
    I personnally like the look, though I think the non-slim fitting of the jacket doesn't really match with an elegant silhouette. As soon as I'll get mine, I intend to taylor it slimer, but would this be in agreement with the whole shape of it?

    The Bennevis one look good and I heard it's good quality stuff.
    [​IMG]

    This is just from a quick google search -
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Grey - the one I bought.
     


  8. Ikouja

    Ikouja Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting topic, but i read the whole of it and I didn't see a word about Donkey Jackets?
    Many people don't appreciate the PVC shoulders look for sometimes - in cheap stuff... - being too shiny. Do someone have an idea of when it appeared in the skinhead classics? Seems do have come quite late, or am I wrong? Do someone have pictures?
    I personnally like the look, though I think the non-slim fitting of the jacket doesn't really match with an elegant silhouette. As soon as I'll get mine, I intend to taylor it slimer, but would this be in agreement with the whole shape of it?

    The Bennevis one look good and I heard it's good quality stuff.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Grey - the one I bought.


    I have a black one from Ben Nevis on the way from the UK (Last UK purchase was a bottle of hot sauce that just got here today...ordered probably close to a month ago..[​IMG] ). Personally, I think the grey one looks horrible, just not a fan on the PVC shoulder at all, it may be a little more practical when it's raining, but I don't normally opt for a heavy wool coat when it's raining (mainly because I wouldn't wear a heavy wool coat before it hit 32F/0C) so I'd only have it in the snow which I wouldn't be worried about getting soaked through in a wool coat... Sorry for the rant, just my thoughts and now that I looked at it, the grey aint so bad, just the shoulders on it.

    PS. I personally think the skinhead silhouette looks nice with a slightly puffy top (think: harringtons, "bomber"[monkey] jacket, donkey jacket, none are slim fitting really). Not too puffy like a flight jacket(yuck), but if I were you I'd leave it boxy, I wear a peacoat(untailored, boxy) with my gear on and it looks great. Just don't wander into puffy pants! Like BDU's/combat trousers and ill-fitting jeans!
     


  9. Jean-Jacques

    Jean-Jacques Member

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    Well i also prefer without the pvc shoulders on black ones, but what i liked with the grey one was the contrast. Well soon I will get it and see.

    (Of course I would never wear baggy or combat trousers, don't be unpolite! ;-) )
     


  10. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Distinguished Member

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    Very interesting topic, but i read the whole of it and I didn't see a word about Donkey Jackets?

    They have been mentioned in passing. I posted to the effect that in 1969 I saw a grand total of 1 (one) skinhead in the whole of the UK wearing a donkey jacket.
     


  11. browniecj

    browniecj Distinguished Member

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    They have been mentioned in passing. I posted to the effect that in 1969 I saw a grand total of 1 (one) skinhead in the whole of the UK wearing a donkey jacket.
    Donkey Jackets were around briefly(`68)but then other Jackets and Coats became available.[​IMG]
     


  12. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Distinguished Member

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    Donkey Jackets were around briefly(`68)but then other Jackets and Coats became available.[​IMG]

    Y'know, I didn't see any in '68 at all.

    I think the main thing about them is that they were seen as workwear, not casual or smart gear. (Strangely, Jungle Greens and boots were not.)

    Someone else commented a few posts ago that mods wore DMs. In London through late mod / early skin times there was a variety of boots including DMs. The shot of me below (Spring Bank Holiday 1969, Margate) shows me in boots which aren't DMs - and indeed Levis without turnups - both of which were acceptable.
    [​IMG]

    However, DMs were in the ascendant in '69, and I bought a pair of DM reds in summer '69.

    Incidentally, does anyone else remember skinheads being referred to as "John Boys"? It was nothing to do with The Waltons, it was to do with the Cockney habit of calling someone you didn't know "John".

    "Oi John! You screwin' my sort?" ("Screwing" in that context means looking at! A "sort" wasn't a female suedehead, it was just a slang term for any girl.)

    "Oi, John! You're parked on my bleedin' foot! That's out-of-order!"
     


  13. browniecj

    browniecj Distinguished Member

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  14. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Distinguished Member

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    Never heard the name "John Boys",but then that was probably another Northern thing. [​IMG]

    Nope, strictly cockney. One of my girlfriends (Mardie was her name, she was on my arm on that Margate pic, but I cut the pic in half when we split up) used to say "You're a 'John Boy', that's what you are!". [​IMG]
     


  15. browniecj

    browniecj Distinguished Member

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    Nope, strictly cockney. One of my girlfriends (Mardie was her name, she was on my arm on that Margate pic, but I cut the pic in half when we split up) used to say "You're a 'John Boy', that's what you are!". [​IMG]
    Oh right!Probably, because we were too busy saying "Oi John,who are you screwing?"if you know what I mean,John?[​IMG]
     


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