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Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. Lasttye

    Lasttye Senior member

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    What came after the Skinheads 68/70..for some 71, I have no real interest....I lived through it and rather forget it......
     
  2. TomMc666

    TomMc666 Senior member

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    A bit of a stereotyping of the later waves of skinhead! Think we've had it on here before, there wasnt just one wave after 77, but a number , all with different influences from music, politics - including none - and age and location and also with different looks. And also overlapping with each other
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2013
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  3. TomMc666

    TomMc666 Senior member

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    Whos talking about football? Plenty of blokes didnt go to football and the main elements of the casual look, as in my post, were already embedded years ahead of the 'casual' look from football, having a drink down Hackney Road or up the Angel in 76/77.
     
  4. cerneabbas

    cerneabbas Senior member

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    Same as me....that's why I suggested another thread....I think more threads would keep this one more "on subject" .
     
  5. cerneabbas

    cerneabbas Senior member

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    I got to plead guilty to mentioning football....when I see Casual mentioned I always think football Casual because that was where I used to see it most.
     
  6. Bob the Badger

    Bob the Badger Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Totally off topic but this was the magnetic football game I had as a boy. I looked on ebay to see if it was worth selling but in the end it went to the tip.
     
  7. Lasttye

    Lasttye Senior member

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    For me personally from 72 to 75 was a awful period...The cloths just got stupid..and the ex disciplined skinheads just lost it...with drink, drugs , and violence..loyalties went out the window....maybe it was because we was getting older and lost our innocence.
    The period 68 too 71 was a glorious time and thats why i like this thread...
     
  8. cerneabbas

    cerneabbas Senior member

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    Interesting you should mention drugs...as kids we thought hippies take drugs,skinheads hate drugs,as the 70s went on drugs seemed to become more widespread.
    I still think that drug use exploded in the early 80s,up until then the war against drugs could have been won after that it was to firmly entrenched in society,now its just part of life for a LOT of people.
     
  9. Lasttye

    Lasttye Senior member

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    Cerneabbas as skinheads we hated Hippies and Drugs...But some lads fell by the wayside as they grew their hair longer and ended up looking like the hippies they once hated.
    I was chatting to a couple of my mates last year from the 60s and was surprised they took drugs from around 72...Me i have never taken drugs....Beer has always been my downfall,:D
     
  10. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    Music -When I first started to go to a soul club in late 1970, having just turned 16, the music played was a mixture of current soul and Motown hits and older soul and Motown tracks, many of which I had never heard before. The club was in a small town called Shaw which was about 10 or 11 miles from Manchester city centre and, as such, was heavily influenced by the Twisted Wheel club in Manchester. I have no doubt the DJ, who was several years older than us, was or had been a regular at the 'Wheel' as I have subsequently discovered virtually all the records played were also favourites in the city centre. Some of the older regulars also frequented the Twisted Wheel until it was closed down a few months later. At this time the club was almost exclusively 'skinhead', in it's widest sense - you didn't have to have a crop to get in but if you weren't wearing the style you would have looked and no doubt felt out of place. No problem for me, of course, as by that time I was well into the whole scene as were all the lads I went with. The type of music played covered a wide range of soul styles - not only those that would later become 'Northern' soul classics (The Snake - Al Wilson, Soul Time - Shirley Ellis, Little Piece Of Leather - Donny Elbert)) but also records that would not be played at a 'Northern' venue these days (Uptight - Stevie Wonder, Sweetest Feeling - Jackie Wilson, Saturday Night At The Movies - The Drifters, Hey Girl Don't Bother Me - The Tams). We appreciated that these were old records but understood that they had been danced to in the mod era (some of my mates older brothers had gone to the same club 2 or 3 years earlier). There was the odd reggae/ska track such as Al Capone by Prince Buster, but there would be only 2 or three of these a night. We embraced these sounds as 'our' music and knew that most kids weren't into it and that it wasn't what people were listening to elsewhere.This made it, like our style of dress, special to us or 'exclusive' if you prefer that term. Most towns round and about had a similar style of soul club, such a the 'Chambers' in Rochdale or at the very least a venue where this type of music was played once a week, such as the 'Candlelight Club' in Oldham, which, bizarrely was a Monday night (and, take it from me, you wouldn't have be been seen there any other night of the week!) I'm pretty sure this was the case right across the north of England at that time. So popular did this type of music become that the record companies started to re-release some of these previously unsuccessful tracks - Heaven Must Have Sent You by the Elgins is one that springs to mind - that proved to be big hits second time around. I have read or heard that some of these records didn't 'chart' because their popularity was so localised that the people who drew up the charts (called the HIT PARADE back then!) thought the record companies were trying to manipulate the charts by mass buying in a particular region. As M-O-M has stated we regarded ourselves as 'Soul Fans' - no distinction was made. It was a coincidence that much of this music was from cities in the northern states of the USA such as Detroit and Chicago, but we also danced to Green Onions by Booker T & the MGs , Ride Your Pony by Lee Dorsey and Memphis Soul Stew by King Curtis which were all from, well, Memphis! To this day the best example of soul dancing I have ever seen was in this small town club by a lad dancing to 'Satisfaction' by Otis Redding -- absolutely spellbinding and not a back-drop in sight. I never heard the term 'Northern Soul' at this time. Sometimes this type of music was referred to as 'Rhythm and Soul' - Yankmod, you may have come across the term 'Uptown Soul' or simply 'Uptown' which I believe was also used. We just called it soul music. It was here and then that I first learned to dance, first 'got off' with girls (all of them skinheads) and in fact laid the foundations of my social life pretty much ever since.

    I attended this club until 1972 and the same kind of music was played throughout. By this time we had gone through the suedehead fashion, which to me was just a smarter version of skinhead - other than the smarter clothes we were just the same. In 1972 the club started to get quieter and quieter until, in the end, it closed down. I knew the writing was on the wall that spring when a good friend of mine, Herbie, a soul fan and suedehead like myself at that time, and I were chatting to a girl in Royton Youth Club when the DJ played a record and Herbie said, "This is a Great Record!" On the dance floor some girls were doing a contrived dance, swinging their arms across their chest and lifting their knees to the beat - the record? "Rock and Roll" by Gary Glitter. I couldn't believe it. "You what!?!?!" I exclaimed. Of course, he had seen the future and I hadn't. It really was the beginning of the end. Some tried to keep the look of the terraces alive with Doc Martens, wide fitting jeans, Rupert trousers and football jumpers etc. but really, most young kids were looking at Mr. Glitter, David Bowie and Slade as their style icons.By December of that year youth style had been transformed. Apologies if I've told this story before. Some lads from school were going to going to a Christmas disco at another school and asked if I would go (always a bit of safety in numbers....) Whilst there I got off with a girl from our school (coals to Newcastle?) who was a couple of years younger than me, but a fine looking lass. She was with her older sister. 12 months previously both had been suedeheads, now both were wearing baggy white trousers, platform shoes and wearing glitter make up around their eyes. Incidentally, Herbie really had seen the future as he ultimately married that girl we'd been talking to.

    After the suedehead look petered out I was at a bit of a loss, fashion-wise. We had moved from Royton at Easter 1972 and I was studying for my A-levels so didn't get out much, other than to football, where I was still wearing elements of the skinhead/suedehead/boot boy look. I'd even grown my hair a bit, but all in all was not really in a good place. To go away to college I had my hair cut short again (in fact, just before I started college the barber took one look at me and without saying a word attached the number three clippers and gave me a crop) Late September 1973 I turned up at teacher training college, the only skinhead in the place. I played up to the image a bit by wearing BD collared check shirts, Wranglers and Denim Jacket and of course, at the college discos, I had a particular, soul dance style. I soon got into the dress code of the more stylish students and settled in to having a great time. One of the traditions at college was that everyone in our hall of residence would gather each Thursday night in the huge television lounge to watch 'Top Of The Pops'. One night in 1975 the presenter said "And now, introducing to you the latest phenomenom sweeping the north of England, Northern Soul" On came 'Footsie' with a dance floor full of Wigan Casino regulars doing their stuff. Someone in the television lounge shouted out "It's Roytonboy!" and everyone present looked at me and nodded their agreement. So three years after I had last been to a soul club and never having heard the term 'Northern Soul', I was immediately associated with the music and some aspects of the style. I don't class myself as a 'Northern Soul' fan per se though I do like some Northern Soul, just as I like many other styles of soul music. Like many of you, I have a particularly strong attachment to the music of my youth.

    So, Yankmod, I have to disagree with your assertion that Northern Soul is so named because it comes from the northern United States. If this was the case we'd refer to Stax and Atlantic soul as 'Southern Soul' which of course, we don't. We do recognise that it is from the USA, as is nearly all soul music, and no-one is trying to take that away from you. On the subject of soul in the USA, a friend from college went on a student exchange to a university in Buffalo during college year 1974/75. Whilst there he went to see Isaac Hayes in concert. He said he was the only white person there and when he walked into the concert hall EVERYBODY turned round to look at him.
     
  11. cerneabbas

    cerneabbas Senior member

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    Beer ( and other drinks),people seemed to go out and have a drink but there wasn't so much drunkenness ? or am I looking back with rose tinted glasses here ?
    I know one thing for definite,you never used to see girls/women drunk like you do now,i can remember the shock I felt when I first saw a girl drunk,and I mean a bit drunk not falling on the floor,throwing up like you see them now.
     
  12. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    Incidentally, when I speak of the 'suedehead' look, I'm talking about what we actually wore and not the Keeganesque hooped tank tops and beagle collared shirts depicted on the cover of the book of the same name. I'm talking about plain coloured Ben Shermans, long sleeved v-neck pullovers, parallel trousers, long wing 'Royals' brogues, loafers, Crombie overcoats, blazers etc.
     
  13. cerneabbas

    cerneabbas Senior member

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    roytonboy...I have always thought that to some people the music was like the clothes,they liked what was "in" and moved on when something else became popular( I was slightly different in that I never liked any music much )
    Of course some people really did like soul,ska and a bit later funk,its quite funny I occasionally meet people that I knew in the 70s and they say,oh you should come to Soul train or Motown nights,theres a few of us that go,i nod my head and smile with no intention of going.
    I said once before that I think lots of lads went to football because their mates went,once skinhead was over I bet they never went again.
    A lot of people just want to fit in,probably splashed Brut on and didn't really like the smell...I went along with the rubbish clothes that came after Suedehead for a while.
     
  14. cerneabbas

    cerneabbas Senior member

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    I think that you may be confusing the covers of these "classic " books....on the front of Suedehead they are wearing crombies,its Boot boys and Smoothies where the beagle collars and tank tops are shown....knowledge that I take no pleasure in.
     
  15. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    Brilliant post R'boy.Mirrors my memories pretty much the same up to the point of A Levels.
    Yank mod argues that Northern Soul as it's now recognised is not a genre,nor is Beach Music,but they were both compilations of Black music created from all pockets of of black America,NSE and West. Embraced and enjoyed by predominantly white kids.Beach Music in N Carolina,Northern Soul in the North of England.We never differentiated between where it came from in America,or who it's audience was in it's homeland.
     
  16. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    In reflection 1971/2 gave us Bowie,Bolan and Budgie.All strong images.A mate of mine who was a skinhead from Kingsbury said that seeing Bolan at Wembley then was a big turning point.
     
  17. Lasttye

    Lasttye Senior member

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    I found alcohol was the downfall of many of us in Kilburn....i am sure it was because many had a irish backgrounds, Violence happened every weekend...it was like normal to go out and fight...and it was all caused by drink...you would wake up in the morning with a hangover and go over the stuff you did last night ...I would spend days after regretting what i had done only to repeat it the next weekend...in the end i just walked away...Over the years so many i knew from back then have died from alcohol abuse.
     
  18. Clouseau

    Clouseau Senior member

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    I'm not completely sure this picture of Portsmouth's fans has been posted. I don't remember the kids.
    But well, must have been, somewhere in the 1000 pages. Very difficult to find something unpublished.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2013
  19. cocostella

    cocostella Senior member

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    This thread has been a real pleasure to read from its inception. I've really appreciated the pictures you lot have painted of such a great era in style and music (though I prefer early reggae over more classic soul). Being in my later 40s and southern California bred, I was a long way off in both time and place from the originals. However, by pure chance mod did reach out it's hand and change my life forever:

    In 1978 I was 11yo and way into music. My friends and I were mainly into the first albums by the Cars, the Police and Cheap Trick's "Live at Budakan." Nothing to be embarrassed about, even to this day IMHO. We were also soccer ("football" I know!) players. My parents decided to host an exchange student from the UK, probably to widen my cultural horizons and improve my soccer skills as well! I'll never forget them letting me off at the curb outside the airport to go meet him at the gate and bring him outside. I was feeling pretty good an my new-wave gear and two tickets to a Cheap Trick concert in my jacket pocket. I was gonna' show this guy what was up and turn him onto some real cutting edge shit... Lol. Next thing I know, out struts this guy in a dark green mohair suit, white shirt and socks, black tie and tasseled Weejuns, holding a stack of records in one arm and duffle in the other. Oh yea, his hair was buzzed to about a no.3, with a nice part and jet black. I was tripping. I knew right away he had me beat style-wise. However, I still had confidence in my music at least... Well, that was fleeting. We got back to my room, cranked up the stereo and went tune for tune. The albums he'd brought over consisted of the first 2 Jam and Clash albums, and some others I can't really recall. In The City and All Mod Cons, in particular, really floored me. Needless to say, I made up my mind right there and then. Mod was it and I was converted. Of course, I made sure to put my gear together without my friends' knowledge, and come out with the full kit in their faces all at once. Had to be ahead of the game and have them playing catch-up ever since.
     
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  20. Lasttye

    Lasttye Senior member

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    Great story Cocostella,:)
     

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