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Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. Darksideoftheforce

    Darksideoftheforce Well-Known Member

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    Well southerners would take offense at being called "yank." Since some of them are still brooding over losing the American civil war." ;)
     
  2. Kingstonian

    Kingstonian Senior member

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    School dances were soft targets. I remember a particular hooligan family in Harrow that liked to start trouble at school discos.
     
  3. Botolph

    Botolph Senior member

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    I'm in Australia and they call the British "Poms" and Americans "Seppos"(short for "septic[tanks]", a weird contraction from the Cockney rhyming slang).

    Seeing as politics permeate almost everything else, it's not a susrprise that it comes up in an internet forum discussing a large group of kids whose heyday was 40+ years ago, with people who were and weren't there. Context, setting, and background make for a more informative and interesting read.

    Enjoying most aspects of this discussion! Great stuff, people.
     
  4. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    I have seen "Brits Go Home" and "Yanks Go Home" plastered on Walls,so hardly terms of endearment."Limeys" was a derogatory term first made by American Sailors about the British Navy`s use of Lemons or Limes.It then became a name for all British."Ghosts","Honky" and other Names have been used,so every one has a name for everybody else-and it is always ,mainly, to do with History.


    Great Photos Bunty
    I remember seeing the Skinhead Photo come out originally.By then it was old Fashion.

    Back in the 60s,we used to meet up with some of the Willesden Mob and go around Soho etc.To say things happened unexpectedly would be an understatement :)
     
  5. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    *runs away, screaming hysterically.
     
  6. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    It was a bit different for me, having been brought up in a cricket-playing family (in Lancashire where, like in Yorkshire, it wasn't exclusively a middle-class thing), and having rubbed shoulders with Asian and Caribbean players. I can remember using the 'N' word once and being ashamed of myself for doing so. I can remember using the long word 'Pakistani', along with 'Asian' and 'Black', and I can certainly remember other people using P*** and N*****, so yes, it was widespread.

    [BTW anyone who was at York last year will remember my telling a story about a cricket match in Fleetwood with a scratch team made up from the West Indian Test squad... Something happened that had a whole crowd of West Indians helpless with laughter, but which just couldn't happen these days. I'll leave you with that teaser.]
     
  7. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Like my mate Lloyd Beramsingh - Punjabi-British, short hair, no beard, no turban.
     
  8. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I don't mind being called a 'Brit' - in fact the word goes back a couple of thousand years - because that's what I am, being mixed English/Scottish/Irish/Welsh heritage. But again it's all down to the context and the way it's said. I used to object to the way irish nationalists used the word, because they used it as a term of contempt, and that prevented me from listening to their point of view.
     
  9. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    To be fair, Colin, you would be hard pressed these days to find anyone who is an apologist for Stalin & Co. We're getting a bit off-topic, though.
     
  10. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Someone should have told George M Cohan :D



    Sorry - going way off topic now!
     
  11. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I could be wrong, Roy, but I don't remember this one. Thank Della - this will be great to have for the press-cutting section of the book.
     
  12. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Usual question, Bunty - why's got the copyright?
     
  13. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    An Irish newspaper, no?
     
  14. catchourbreath

    catchourbreath Well-Known Member

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    If you're referring to Stalin and Co they're far closer to Fascism. Just like National Socialism had little to do with Socialism. A large chunk of initial communist thinkers were Jews, so I doubt they'd write self-extermination into their ideology.

    The problem I always came across with Skinhead was regardless of the time period dodgy politics always run rampant. The Look can be ace, music awesome, but far too much stupidity on the political end,
     
  15. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    Catchourbreath-Good morning to you.Yes there were Jews who were involved in the original Communist Uprisings.To begin with everything went well.Fast forward to Stalin`s time and he starts getting paranoid about a "Zionist State".So expulsions started and trips to the Gulags(which many,many did not come back).The numbers are unobtainable but it is estimated that far more perished over the years.1980/1990,(still Communist)mass migration happened with many Jews leaving Russia.

    Were you about in the 60s,do you know the Politics of that decade?Or is it something you have read in a Book?Skinheads were not interested in Politics(in the 60s),they knew Life as it was.It was later when Skinheads got involved Politically-so get your Facts right before calling someone stupid.
     
  16. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    Sorry, I think it's my fault we went off topic for a while there .......

    Just on the subject of names - Is it offensive to call someone from Liverpool a Scouser? Some people claim it is, others not. It's all in the delivery - If I'm talking to a Liverpudlian and I say "Scouse humour is different to Manchester humour" then that wouldn't be a problem. On the other hand if I was to say, "That's the trouble with you f*cking Scousers, your'e not as funny as you think you are" then that would be a different matter! They call us Mancs. They refer to United and United fans as "The Mancs", that makes me laugh though, as most of 'em aren't from Manchester! I particularly like the term "Mickey Mouser" which is used in Manchester, (rhymes with scouser)

    Similarly the word "Paki" was originally used as a shortened version of Pakistani (as in Aussie for Australian) It was the way it became used that made it derogatory. Unfortunately my mother (aged 89) still uses the word, almost inevitably prefixed by the word "bloody". Our American members will relate to this - I watched a T.V. Series on the American Civil War in which a southerner claimed that until his 20's he had never heard the term "Yankee" without the word "Damn" if front of it, so much so that as a child he thought it was all one word!
     
  17. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    In my own blunt way,that is what I was talking about.They were Slang words.I would say"I went to the Paki Shop on the Corner" or I went to the "Chinky Take-away".To tell People where I went,as opposed to I went to Dewhursts` or Burtons.We did not know their Names who ran the Corner Shop etc.The one about Nigga was a Question that has always baffled me.Again,nothing more nothing less.
     
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  18. MikeDT

    MikeDT Senior member

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    I'm hungry, probably find one of them around here. We used to say things like that all the time when we was at school, Paki shop, Chinky, etc. This was in Bristol, where black people were often referred to as chombies. Was just slang, and thought nothing of it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2013
  19. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    :D:D
     
  20. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    Anyway, back on topic.....

    Man. City v. Chelsea. 6th Jan. 1973

    We turned up at Maine Road on a foggy Saturday for the game against Chelsea - the turnstiles were not open and a burly police sargeant told us that the ref. was inspecting the pitch. We hung around, hung around, hung around until eventually, at about two o'clock it was anounced that the match had been postponed. By this time, of course, there were hundreds of people milling around - Saturday afternoon, no match - what was a boot boy to do? Someone anounced, "Oldham are playing Bolton this afternoon, let's go there!" Now, Oldham against Bolton was a big local derby and lads at school had been buzzing about it all week due to the amount of trouble there had been the previous season. The proposal was met with general approval and about 200 of the Kippax's finest began marching off down the road. A couple of Chelsea fans of about our age enquired where we were going and on hearing about it decided to come to! We marched into town and down to Victoria Station for the service train to Oldham. There were so many of us that they put a couple of extra carriages on and packed in like sardines we shunted off, no doubt to the great relief of BR staff in Victoria. At Oldham Werneth we were all instructed to disembark and the 200 or so of us, all wearing City colours, were given a police escort and marched the the final mile and a half to Boundary Park. Of course, by the time we finally arrived it was already half time and all the turnstiles were closed. No problem, we found one of the large exit doors behind the open end and about a dozen of us got our hands underneath it and simply lifted it up off it's hinges! In a scene akin to the storming of Badajoz in the 'Sharpe' series, we poured through the breach. Once inside we found the stadium to be absolutely rammed full. So much so that some Bolton fans were walking across the side of the pitch to the Open End as the Wanderers would be kicking that way in the second half. All the City fans,naturally, wanted to be in the Chaddy End and the only way was for us to make the opposite journey [​IMG] You could see the bemusement on the faces of the Bolton supporters - "What the f*ck are these City fans doing here?" and fights broke out there and then on the pitch. Lots of Blues piled straight into the Bolton hard core who had remained in the Chaddy End and loads were ejected by police before the second half commenced - all that way and never even saw a ball being kicked - crazy days! I have occasionally wondered how those two Chelsea fans got home - they musn't have had a clue where on earth they were!

    Fashion note - some of the Bolton fans were still dressed in Levi denim Jacket and Jeans and cherry red Doc Martens a good 20 months after this look had waned in Manchester. I saw a group after the match with their girlfriends - the lads were dressed in this manner and were just growing their hair from skinheads. I was 18 at the time and these guys were all clearly older than me and had long, now quite thick, sideburns. At the time they looked dated but, to be fair, they had "kept the faith". By this time fashion locally had splintered and the skinhead/suedehead look all but gone. Kids around Manchester were painting their Doc Marten's red and black (City), blue and yellow (United) or, even worse, silver (Gary Glitter!) 'Our' look was virtually over - kids were wearing Slade caps, penny round collars "Football Jumpers" , "Star Jumpers" and "Budgie Jackets" A few weeks before I had 'got off' with a girl at a disco. Both she and her sister (steady, I only got off with one of them!) had been of the suedehead persuasion but now both were wearing glittery make up.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2013

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