Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. Lasttye

    Lasttye Senior member

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    When Robert Elms mentions his Brothers mates calling around his house in Burnt Oak, he just about describes every bit of skinhead clothing in a sentence, which is fair enough for his book.
    One thing i do know The Burnt Oak Mob was our enemy, but i have to say this they was the smartest Mob around NW W London by miles. a couple of years later i became friends with one of their main men.. Tom Hickey RIP, One of the best dressed and nicest blokes i ever met.
    For some reason a lot of people do not like Robert Elms, but one thing for sure he is Working class, originally out of the slums of Notting Hill, thats good enough for me.
     


  2. Alex Roest

    Alex Roest Senior member

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    When Robert Elms mentions his Brothers mates calling around his house, he just about describes every bit of skinhead clothing in a sentence, which is fair enough.
    For some reason a lot of people do not like Robert Elms, but one thing for sure he is Working class, originally out of the slums of Notting Hill, thats good enough for me.


    For one thing people didn't like the comparison with chavs, as for the present day skinhead scene that is. Have to say I can see where he's coming from in more than one sense, though...

    As for that claim that he would be able to remember just about every detail of what his brother's mates were wearing it's just a case of filling in the blanks with hindsight I reckon [​IMG]
     


  3. Brideshead

    Brideshead Senior member

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    For one thing people didn't like the comparison with chavs, as for the present day skinhead scene that is. Have to say I can see where he's coming from in more than one sense, though...

    As for that claim that he would be able to remember just about every detail of what his brother's mates were wearing it's just a case of filling in the blanks with hindsight I reckon [​IMG]


    But even so that passage is so good it had the hairs on the back of my neck standing up! I think that whole thing about just how immaculate skins could be was what drove me. It was so well executed in some cases it was a thing of real beauty.

    To answer Jason's point I think the term first became well known in 1969 (as many have said) - at first generating a feeling of belonging but quickly turning sour as 'our own style' was now public property.
     


  4. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    But even so that passage is so good it had the hairs on the back of my neck standing up! I think that whole thing about just how immaculate skins could be was what drove me. It was so well executed in some cases it was a thing of real beauty.

    To answer Jason's point I think the term first became well known in 1969 (as many have said) - at first generating a feeling of belonging but quickly turning sour as 'our own style' was now public property.


    John, I'll second both of these comments.
     


  5. buttons

    buttons Senior member

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    But even so that passage is so good it had the hairs on the back of my neck standing up! I think that whole thing about just how immaculate skins could be was what drove me. It was so well executed in some cases it was a thing of real beauty.

    To answer Jason's point I think the term first became well known in 1969 (as many have said) - at first generating a feeling of belonging but quickly turning sour as 'our own style' was now public property.


    I know this has been touched on various times and it makes total sense.
    But for the older lads, pretty much at the head (in your area) of what was to become' skinhead' fashion, as the media defined it and the kids all flocked to it, what then for the older lads who were there already?
    More mainstream fashion? (as that seems like going from cool and a cut above, to not caring so much)
    Similar style but more grown up and less uniformed?
    Or is it more that the clothes obsessed youngster, dressing (and sometimes fighting) to impress his mates / birds / other gangs is a very short lived thing that you leave behind at a certain age and for the snappy dresser of '68, this just happened to coincide with the tail end of '69?
    You couldn't have just stopped being stylish and fashion conscious in 1970.
    Is this not "˜suedehead' for want of a better phrase, as to set yourself apart from the boots, braces and Harrington clad 14 year old masses?

    Whilst I'm assuming much of the "Made for Skins" items that flooded the market were shunned to some extent, but there must have still been an edge, all be it more difficult to keep exclusive.
    Same sort of principal for the Mods after the papers were pushing the "˜sea-side riots' of '64.
     


  6. Alex Roest

    Alex Roest Senior member

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    But even so that passage is so good it had the hairs on the back of my neck standing up! I think that whole thing about just how immaculate skins could be was what drove me. It was so well executed in some cases it was a thing of real beauty.

    Of course we're talking a poetic licence of sorts here and the man's enthusiasm is for real and that's what counts of course John. Was his description as such ever recognised by the press back then I wonder (like the dress sense of the mods for instance)?
     


  7. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    You couldn't have just stopped being stylish and fashion conscious in 1970.
    Is this not "˜suedehead' for want of a better phrase, as to set yourself apart from the boots, braces and Harrington clad 14 year old masses?


    I don't know of anyone who ever called himself/herself a 'suedehead' at the time. That was never a defined 'look' but a transition from skinhead look to something else more arty/hippy/individualist. It happened while people were growing their hair out and gradually getting a different wardrobe bit by bit - hair doesn't get long overnight, wage packets for new gear have to come week by week. At least that's the way I saw it.

    Okay don't laugh. By the end of 1971 I had long hair and a beard. Here's a picture of me playing mouth organ with Skinners Rats, a disreputable folk band (still going, by the way), in the Walpole pub, New Cross.
    [​IMG]
    Still built like a racing snake, but a hairy one.
     


  8. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Was his description as such ever recognised by the press back then I wonder (like the dress sense of the mods for instance)?

    As far as I recall, all the press ever talked about was the 'uniform' of boots, braces, and 'military' cropped hair. Ironically the best description by an outsider was Chris Welch's mean-spirited, elitist, piece of class-prejudice about 'mods' in 1969 in Melody Maker. That one actually mentioned suits!
     


  9. Alex Roest

    Alex Roest Senior member

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    I don't know of anyone who ever called himself/herself a 'suedehead' at the time. That was never a defined 'look' but a transition from skinhead look to something else more arty/hippy/individualist. It happened while people were growing their hair out and gradually getting a different wardrobe bit by bit - hair doesn't get long overnight, wage packets for new gear have to come week by week. At least that's the way I saw it.

    I can remember Bomber once stated that 'Smoothie' would be the term people actually used (and definitely not suedehead indeed) which was substantiated by Colin via this quote:

    Penny Collars started coming in (mid 70). If I remember rightly John Wesley Hardy were the first followed by Shermans. 71/72, I would have considered myself a "Smoovie"- to get away from the stereo-type Skinhead. A Newspaper Article appeared in one of the Nationals, highlighting this Fashion (started in the East-End). This again brought Media Focus.
    I had a No.2 with a Razor Parting (68/69).Then I started growing it.
     


  10. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    I can remember Bomber once stated that 'Smoothie' would be the term people actually used (and definitely not suedehead indeed) which was substantiated by Colin via this quote:
    I remember,in the Article,that the Guy speaking said this was a name that his Mates,called their Dress Sense(as opposed to Media Name-dropping).I cannot remember the Guys name-but I can say He came out of Stepney.It was Penny Collar Shirts,Mohair Trousers(with 1/2 Turn-ups)and Royal Smooths.
     


  11. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    I don't know of anyone who ever called himself/herself a 'suedehead' at the time. That was never a defined 'look' but a transition from skinhead look to something else more arty/hippy/individualist. It happened while people were growing their hair out and gradually getting a different wardrobe bit by bit - hair doesn't get long overnight, wage packets for new gear have to come week by week. At least that's the way I saw it.

    Okay don't laugh. By the end of 1971 I had long hair and a beard. Here's a picture of me playing mouth organ with Skinners Rats, a disreputable folk band (still going, by the way), in the Walpole pub, New Cross.
    [​IMG]
    Still built like a racing snake, but a hairy one.

    You hadsome Devil you![​IMG]
     


  12. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    That should read Handsome,M-o-M!
     


  13. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    'hadsome' works. I'll take 'hadsome' [​IMG]
     


  14. Little Queenie

    Little Queenie Senior member

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    'hadsome' works. I'll take 'hadsome' [​IMG]

    Was that before, after or during your 'O'Hara' phase?!
     


  15. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Was that before, after or during your 'O'Hara' phase?!

    I trimmed it a bit for O'Hara.
     


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