Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    It is interesting really.I have received a couple of Pictures back from my Sisters`,one fron `70 and the other `71.In the `70 one I have a side parting and the second one-I had my hair cut because it was my Wedding Photo.A year later it was Shoulder Length.So that very much ties in with what M-o-M says.
    In agreement with the "Dress Code".If you went to the Top Rank Suites,Mecca Ballrooms etc.,you had to be smart.Places like Streatham Locarno,Purley Orchid,Hammersmith Palais you had to wear a tie.
    The fighting would go on still,if you were Smart.I have seen some horrific fights with Glasses etc(this was before plastic mugs were introduced)in the above Dancehalls.One of the worst was two groups of Skinheads kicking off in the Watford Top Rank.Glasses were literally thrown across the Dancefloor,from both groups.Girls were getting cut to pieces.The Door Staff hid.
     


  2. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    The Door Staff hid.

    Blimey, that must have been one hell of a ruck!


    Just got back from a visit to a decent shoe shop in Glasgow, very productive afternoon. Whilst walking down Queen St with my daughter and her boyfriend (who says he isn't a skinhead but does have a No1 and was wearing steelies) we spotted a bloke walking along a few yards ahead. He had the tallest possible boots, bleached jeans rolled up to his knees, red braces hanging down round his 'arris, a black Harrington, and even less hair than me. When he turned round we saw he also had a bushy 'Z Z Topp' beard! We had to chuckle.
     


  3. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Girls called the mod-of-66-68-not-the-far-out-kind 'Peanuts.' at least my sister and her mates did, was this a common name?

    Just picking up again on a post of bunty's from page 94. Quoting from Robert Elms' The Way We Wore (p40) where he is describing the day in 1968 when his older brother Reggie came home with a newly-cropped haircut:

    "When my mother shook her head and asked what this new stylistic abomination was known as, Reggie said that he was a 'peanut', the first label applied to this look. Really he was a pared-down, proletarian mod."
     


  4. Alex Roest

    Alex Roest Senior member

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    This style that emerged was what the 'Hard mods' began to copy. The style became known by many names so for the sake of clarity they shall be referred to as 'Peanuts'. The peanuts were the predecessors of the skinheads. As the mod scene began to fragment the 'Hard mods' as they are often called, standardised their image and began to copy many elements of the style of the blacks. The style that evolved was often termed 'The peanut' because of the sound of their motor scooters which was like 'Peanuts rattling in a tin'. Other names were coined such as The Spy Kids, The Lemons, The No-heads, Spikeys and Brushcuts. This is one peanut's side of the story:

    'We'd just been through the mod era, which we'd all appreciated. I mean we sat around with our scooters In the early days. We an went down to Brighton and Southend, Bank Holiday and we all had a fight with the greasers like the mods did. But then we went to the extreme, I mean we took our hair right down to the limit, you know half-inch or whatever. I had it done at a barbers called Grey's down the East India Dock Road. It wasn't much of an haircut, he just gets those old trimmers out and goes zing, zing, zing and that's it your hair's gone'


    (You'll Never Be 16 Again, BBC books)

    The style began to diversify and move out of the dance hall and on to the streets. It soon become a trademark of the terraces as football hooliganism became a widespread problem. Arsenal's 'North Bank' was one of the first mobs to become overtly skinhead/peanut but it wasn't long before it was the norm at nearly every London ground. In 1968 the peanuts gate crashed a hippy gathering in Grosvenor square. The hippies were chanting 'Ho Ho Ho Chi Minh' and the peanuts were shouting 'Students, Students, ha ha ha'. Nobody knew them as skinheads but they hadn't gone unnoticed. The month before they had invaded Margate for a weekend of mayhem. Originally, the peanuts didn't seem to be for anything but they were very clear what they were against- 'Long hair, pop, hippy sit-ins, live-ins and the long haired cult of non-violence' was how one sixteen year old peanut put it to the Daily Mail. The skinheads despised the hippies as they were seen to be drop-outs while the skinheads were very much working class and could not afford the privilege of 'taking time out'. They'd gone straight from school to work and this seemed to be a big sticking point. The rude boys not averse to a spot of 'bovver' and they too were opposed to a lot of the hippy ideals.

    In late 1968 the term skinhead was becoming used more often to describe what was previously the peanut. The style was basically the same but was becoming more elaborate. The music was becoming a more prominent feature, reggae was the order of the day. Access to the music was a lot easier than it had been five years before. In 1963 there were only three sound systems working the London area but by 1967 there were at least three reputable sound systems in every area where blacks resided. The following passage tells of the early days of the skinheads.

    'White kids had been associating with blacks in clubs like the Ram Jam since black music first became popular In England, but It wasn't until 1967 that the whites had begun to appreciate the reggae music and to mimic the black lifestyle. They fell in love with the first wave of of reggae music that Pama records issued like the instrumentals - 'Spoogy', 'Reggae on Broadway' and '1000 tons of Megaton' by Lester Sterling. They stomped to the frantic dance records like 'Work it' by the Viceroys and 'Children Get Ready' by the Versatiles. They sang along to Pat Kelly's 'How Long will it Take' and Slim Smith's 'Everybody Needs Loves' and laughed at rude items like Max Romeo's 'Wet Dream' or Lloyd Tyrell's 'Bang Bang Lulu'.

    Pretty soon you couldn't go to a black house party without finding a gang of skinheads but amazingly there was very little black/white violence and hardly any resentment. Black and white youth have never been as close as they were in the skinhead era despite the 'mixing' in the trendier soul scenes nowadays The skinheads copied the way we dressed, spoke, walked, the way we danced. They danced with our chicks, smoked our spliff and ate our food and bought our records'


    (Reggae Underground, Carl Gayle, Black Music magazine 1974)
     


  5. Alex Roest

    Alex Roest Senior member

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    I checked but it seems that the first part of the Reggae Underground piece actually took its cue from what was written in 'You'll never be 16 again' except that it said in there that the Arsenal 'North Bank' was the first to become overtly skinhead and it was established during the 1966-7 season. Hence my previous reference BTW.
     


  6. Lasttye

    Lasttye Senior member

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    That is so funny romancing Black and White youth getting on famously, it was not that simple around our way,
    Their was mixing but often it would come to blows, a couple occasions it was open Warfare, Black lads would come into our clubs no problem, but soon as they moved onto a white girl it would often kick off,
    Black girls never came out back then, you would very rarely see them, So Blacks would mostly date White Girls, I would get in the Caxton hall Pimlico, it would be all Black lads, and all White girls, To be honest if a White girl was known to date a Black or seen with a Black lad no one would have the time of day for her after that, she would have to move away, I am sorry but thats the way it was back then.
    People was not necessary racist, but it was a racist society in the 50/60s, people knew no different.
     


  7. Alex Roest

    Alex Roest Senior member

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    People was not necessary racist, but it was a racist society in the 50/60s, people knew no different.

    I can remember having read in a fashion article from some 'serious' British newspaper that one of the 'in' colours (as for suits that is) for the time was nigger brown. We're talking 1962 and it's no joke...
     


  8. Lasttye

    Lasttye Senior member

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    I can remember having read in a fashion article from some 'serious' British newspaper that one of the 'in' colours (as for suits that is) for the time was nigger brown. We're talking 1962 and it's no joke...
    People would often call their Dog N word, Also a very famous WW11 Pilot Guy Gibson called his dog N, If you watch the Film they now dub the word when he calls his dog. Also some clubs like the Tottenham Royal, Lyseam, Top Rank Watford would not allow Black lads in, If a Black lad was with white lads he may be allowed in. In saying that i was with a Black mate one tuesday night trying to get in the Royal and the Bouncer would not let him it, So we had to walk away,
     


  9. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I can remember having read in a fashion article from some 'serious' British newspaper that one of the 'in' colours (as for suits that is) for the time was nigger brown. We're talking 1962 and it's no joke...

    It was, at one time, the 'official' colour of my old school uniform!
     


  10. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    To be honest if a White girl was known to date a Black or seen with a Black lad no one would have the time of day for her.

    That's how it was for a friend of mine called Janet who dated black boys. I think I was the only white bloke who had any time for her back then. She was a friend and I didn't see any reason to stop talking to her, but I was in the minority!
     


  11. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Spy Kids

    Alex you have no idea how much that term makes me want to grind my fcuking teeth! LOL
     


  12. Alex Roest

    Alex Roest Senior member

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    Alex you have no idea how much that term makes me want to grind my fcuking teeth! LOL

    Yes I know Paul. Spikeheads really [​IMG]
     


  13. esswhykay

    esswhykay Senior member

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  14. Kingstonian

    Kingstonian Senior member

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    Some interesting points emerging about aggro. I was always one to keep out of the way
    But the more interesting thing (and this is something the greasers did not do) was the in-fighting among skinheads themselves. In my area it was not restricted to football.....


    Like Brideshead, I also kept out of the way of aggro where possible. I certainly did not seek it out; though, - like everyone - I was aware of individuals who did.

    The style of dressing went with an interest in soul, motown, reggae and dance halls and discos. If you liked hard rock you dressed very differently.

    On the subject of football, Chelsea was the first club football I watched. You could get in to any match. It was cheap. A teenager could buy beer and bring it into the ground. I was not involved in aggro. I stopped going when I was able to get a Saturday job. Thirty bob for working in Woolworth's was more attractive at the time.
     


  15. Kingstonian

    Kingstonian Senior member

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    Also some clubs like the Tottenham Royal, Lyseam, Top Rank Watford would not allow Black lads in, If a Black lad was with white lads he may be allowed in.
    In saying that i was with a Black mate one tuesday night trying to get in the Royal and the Bouncer would not let him it, So we had to walk away,


    I was not aware of that. I always assumed that the record policy was fairly middle of the road to deter blacks from wanting to get in. So not too much reggae or soul - just the hits and the odd track. Saying that, my school was all white Catholic. I did not have black friends. I know they had their own clubs anyway.
     


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