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Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. eightdouble

    eightdouble Senior member

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    there's an asian skinbyrd that works at ben sherman in san fran. full on love at first sight.
     
  2. vaclava krishna

    vaclava krishna Senior member

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    Original skinhead , reenactor ? I am a, punk with a paste on, ethos.
     
  3. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    If by "feather cut" you are referring to the skinhead girls' style, then it is a copy of a style which flourished in 1968 and 1979, commonly called a "centre crop". It was one of several shorter styles of hair for girls which came along during the mod/skinhead era.
     
  4. Get Smart

    Get Smart Senior member

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    M-o-M, would like to pick your brain on jean turnups back in your day...

    growing up we copied English boys from the early 80s so it was considered "correct" to have your turnups at .5"-.75" or so tall, sewn down. Looking at the ton of late 60s photos, you rarely see that, most turnups are typical 1-2" tall and clearly not sewn down. Was the sewn down .5" turnup done in the 60s or is that another "new breed era" creation?

    I dont care for too much correctness anymore, I still have .5" turnups on some jeans, but on others I dont tailor them and just cuff as needed which usually ends up being about 1.5". I like having the variety since the larger turnups look better with shoes imo, whereas the correct .5" looks better with boots.
     
  5. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    M-o-M, would like to pick your brain on jean turnups back in your day...

    growing up we copied English boys from the early 80s so it was considered "correct" to have your turnups at .5"-.75" or so tall, sewn down. Looking at the ton of late 60s photos, you rarely see that, most turnups are typical 1-2" tall and clearly not sewn down. Was the sewn down .5" turnup done in the 60s or is that another "new breed era" creation?

    I dont care for too much correctness anymore, I still have .5" turnups on some jeans, but on others I dont tailor them and just cuff as needed which usually ends up being about 1.5". I like having the variety since the larger turnups look better with shoes imo, whereas the correct .5" looks better with boots.


    Really this is quite easy to answer. The height of the turnup was based loosely on the bottom seam of the Levis, and tended to vary according to how many times the jeans were turned over. Sometimes the turnup was sewn, or at the very least caught with a couple of stitches in order to stop it sagging or unrolling. More often than not this was simply a matter of how long a guy's legs were in relation to the leg size of the jeans!

    Like many 60s skinhead things, it was a hangover from mod style; the idea was never to show yards and yards of boot, but to make sure that your jeans hung just clear of your shoes, and were never baggy. [Somewhere there must be a pic of a young 60s mod guy with turned over Levis I think it's in this book by Richard Barnes.]

    Few people really appreciate how sharp the original skins were, by the way!
     
  6. Big Muscle

    Big Muscle Senior member

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    If talking about turnups... did you shorten your jeans and then just make single turnup? I have Levi's in my full length, so I have to roll it moretimes to show my boots. I always do it along bottom seam to have 1" turnup and it never looks so flat and smart as I see in old pictures.
     
  7. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    If talking about turnups... did you shorten your jeans and then just make single turnup? I have Levi's in my full length, so I have to roll it moretimes to show my boots. I always do it along bottom seam to have 1" turnup and it never looks so flat and smart as I see in old pictures.

    Some guys did, some guys didn't. If you see my handful of pics you'll notice that by-and-large my jeans were roughly the right length not to have to bother with turnups. Re "flat and smart", as I said before, they were sometimes sewn in, also often ironed. And like I said again, the look was supposed to be sharp, as opposed to the rather brutalist look of the various waves of revivalist skins.
     
  8. Get Smart

    Get Smart Senior member

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    If talking about turnups... did you shorten your jeans and then just make single turnup? I have Levi's in my full length, so I have to roll it moretimes to show my boots. I always do it along bottom seam to have 1" turnup and it never looks so flat and smart as I see in old pictures.

    the way it's done, and MoM can correct me if his method is different, is you figure out how long of an inseam you want it to end up being. Let's say 28" for sake of argument. So you shorten the hem so that it is 29", cut off raw without a finished bottom. You fold over .5" and iron it down so there is a hard crease, then fold over again another .5" so you are double cuffing it. Then sew it down so that there is a sharp and clean .5" cuff.
     
  9. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    the way it's done, and MoM can correct me if his method is different, is you figure out how long of an inseam you want it to end up being. Let's say 28" for sake of argument. So you shorten the hem so that it is 29", cut off raw without a finished bottom. You fold over .5" and iron it down so there is a hard crease, then fold over again another .5" so you are double cuffing it. Then sew it down so that there is a sharp and clean .5" cuff.

    That'll work.
     
  10. Paint House Gang

    Paint House Gang Well-Known Member

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    Regarding George Marshall's 'Spirit of '69', some Spannish blogger scanned it, which is quite helpful as its so hard to track down nowadays. I managed to borrow a copy from my University's library about ten years ago, it was in the "restricted section." Didn't treat as a bible though, I had Jim Ferguson's fashion noteboook for that. Anyhow it can be downloaded here if anyone's interested.
     
  11. Clyde

    Clyde Senior member

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    there's an asian skinbyrd that works at ben sherman in san fran. full on love at first sight.

    do people in san fran really call female skinheads "skinbyrds"? I kind of get it, but why skynbirds and not not skinbirds?
     
  12. Get Smart

    Get Smart Senior member

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    Regarding George Marshall's 'Spirit of '69', some Spannish blogger scanned it, which is quite helpful as its so hard to track down nowadays. I managed to borrow a copy from my University's library about ten years ago, it was in the "restricted section." Didn't treat as a bible though, I had Jim Ferguson's fashion noteboook for that. Anyhow it can be downloaded here if anyone's interested.
    S of 69 is a good book, even if too many after its release did treat it as if it were the defining word on skinhead culture (which it isn't). We all pre-ordered ours before its release since we all subscribed to the "Skinhead Times" newspaper that Marshall put out (wish I still had all my issues ), pretty exciting when the book finally came out. I remember it was like $20 shipped from UK, and we were thinking "for that much money it'd better be fucking great". It goes for obscene money on ebay in past few years. He put out a companion book called Skinhead Nation which was the basis for the filmed documentary "World of Skinhead"
     
  13. Paint House Gang

    Paint House Gang Well-Known Member

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    ^ Yeah I had a VHS copy of that documentary, didn't realise there was an accompanying book. Is it any good?

    Is there a music chapter?

    A chapter about people trying to track down the clothes they read about in 'The Skinhead Bible'?
     
  14. Get Smart

    Get Smart Senior member

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    no the book is just like the filmed version, it follows the same people in both. each chapter is about each crew the book focuses on. so there's a chapter on NYC, one on Prenzlauerberg Germany, etc etc. The video has small interviews with an "incognito" Paul Burnley (of No Remorse RAC band) which isnt in the book (unless it is and I forgot), and I'll give Marshall kudos that at least he tries to stay objective and presents all sides of the cult without any prejudice or bias.
     
  15. Ancillotti

    Ancillotti Member

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    Hello Man of Mystery, I'm interested in what you said earlier about jungle green trousers causing a stir when you came back up north.
    What was it about them that caused the raised eyebrows? Also can you describe the trousers, as over the years I've heard many conflicting tales of which ones they were, surplus stores sold many various army trousers at the time, what were you identifying as the important features that made them "jungle greens"?

    I find this information about the "skins" who came along before us enthralling.
     
  16. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Hello Man of Mystery, I'm interested in what you said earlier about jungle green trousers causing a stir when you came back up north.
    What was it about them that caused the raised eyebrows? Also can you describe the trousers, as over the years I've heard many conflicting tales of which ones they were, surplus stores sold many various army trousers at the time, what were you identifying as the important features that made them "jungle greens"?


    I can only say what I remember from S E London. They were plain, olive drab trousers, nothing fancy, no extra pockets, in a fabric maybe a bit more lightweight than modern camo trousers.

    What caused a stir, I think, was only that they hadn't seen them before, and it was quite a surprise to see one of their old mob in something different.

    M-o-M
     
  17. Ancillotti

    Ancillotti Member

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    MoM thanks for the quick reply. Maybe I didn't word that very well what I meant was what made them stand out from the trousers that they expected you to be wearing, not mohair/ LEVIS, wider, distinctive green, what would've previously have been seen as workwear being worn as smart gear, coarser styling (heavy belt loops, large raised seams etc.).
    Also can you remember what material they were made from? Wool, cotton (either coarse like denim or smooth like sta prest) or poly cotton (very light weight)?
     
  18. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    MoM thanks for the quick reply. Maybe I didn't word that very well what I meant was what made them stand out from the trousers that they expected you to be wearing, not mohair/ LEVIS, wider, distinctive green, what would've previously have been seen as workwear being worn as smart gear, coarser styling (heavy belt loops, large raised seams etc.).
    Also can you remember what material they were made from? Wool, cotton (either coarse like denim or smooth like sta prest) or poly cotton (very light weight)?


    Like I said, the fabric was similar to modern camo trousers that one would buy in a surplus store - I guess they were cotton - but of a lighter weight and thinner. The style was pretty unremarkable as regards belt loops, seams, width, etc, and they were worn without a crease. In London they were being worn as an occasional alternative to jeans, but up in the North West they had never been seen before - it was that simple fact that made them stand out. In the North West the fashion at the time was almost exclusively for wearing Levis and practically no other kind of strides. I really can't embellish this story any more than that.
     
  19. gelassenheit

    gelassenheit Active Member

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    This is an odd question. I've adopted a slightly skinhead look, and wear glasses. I'm curious to know, were there any particular styles of glasses that were popular amongst skins way back when?
     
  20. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    This is an odd question. I've adopted a slightly skinhead look, and wear glasses. I'm curious to know, were there any particular styles of glasses that were popular amongst skins way back when?

    Not that I can remember.

    Wear what looks good on you.

    M-o-M
     

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