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Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    sleeve clips were worn! Was that common?
    Arm bands to keep the cuffs at the right length. My old mate 'Cockney Bob' wore them - called them 'Georges' or 'Saint Georges'.
     


  2. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Never saw a Skinhead in the 60s wearing a double breasted Sheepskin, Not being funny but the sheepskin in the photo looks like a old woman's Coat.
    I'm with you on that one.
     


  3. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I've been wondering why in a lot of these old photos, the guys part their hair almost in the middle of their foreheads. Maybe I'm just weird, but my hair parts at the corner of my forehead.
    In '68 my parting was fairly high. [​IMG] In '69 it was a little lower. [​IMG]
     


  4. bunty

    bunty Senior member

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    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Never saw a Skinhead in the 60s wearing a double breasted Sheepskin, Not being funny but the sheepskin in the photo looks like a old woman's Coat.
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] That's pee'd on his fireworks!
     


  5. Alex Roest

    Alex Roest Senior member

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    In '68 my parting was fairly high, in '69 it was a little lower. Also, in London we wore our shirts with the top button undone, with a tightly-knotted windsor knot tie.

    As mentioned before there is some fantastic input to be found on this thread as for 'proper' Peanut/Totter fashion [​IMG]
     


  6. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    As mentioned before there is some fantastic input to be found on this thread as for 'proper' Peanut/Totter fashion [​IMG]

    Alex, re: "Also, in London we wore our shirts with the top button undone, with a tightly-knotted windsor knot tie.", this is roughly what I had in mind (pre bd roll-collar, '68):

    [​IMG]
     


  7. Alex Roest

    Alex Roest Senior member

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    Alex, re: "Also, in London we wore our shirts with the top button undone, with a tightly-knotted windsor knot tie.", this is roughly what I had in mind (pre bd roll-collar, '68):

    Would be interesting if you'd expand on that M-o-M i.e. I've noticed you wore a tie w/a more casual outfit in that pic you've posted up. I take it is wasn't that uncommon for some to wear a tie during the daytime in the 'early days' ?
     


  8. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Would be interesting if you'd expand on that M-o-M i.e. I've noticed you wore a tie w/a more casual outfit in that pic you've posted up. I take it is wasn't that uncommon for some to wear a tie during the daytime in the 'early days' ?

    It was very much a mod/totter thing - a tie with a v-neck sweater or slipover, even worn with jeans, sometimes with a suit jacket on top. Up North we had always worn our ties with a large knot and with the shirt fastened; the ties would normally have been striped (small polka dots having come and gone) and often what you did was 'collect' a tie from your current girlfriend's school. When I got to London in '68 I found that although most guys wore striped ties some did still wear polka-dots. The main difference was that the S E Londoners unbuttoned the top button of the shirt, wore the tie slightly loosened (as in my sketch). The knot was indeed a tight Windsor, and the body of the tie flared away from it. The wearing of ties with casual clothes tended to die out when Ben Sherman (etc) shirts really took off.
     


  9. Alex Roest

    Alex Roest Senior member

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    It was very much a mod/totter thing - a tie with a v-neck sweater or slipover, even worn with jeans, sometimes with a suit jacket on top. Up North we had always worn our ties with a large knot and with the shirt fastened; the ties would normally have been striped (small polka dots having come and gone) and often what you did was 'collect' a tie from your current girlfriend's school. When I got to London in '68 I found that although most guys wore striped ties some did still wear polka-dots. The main difference was that the S E Londoners unbuttoned the top button of the shirt, wore the tie slightly loosened (as in my sketch). The knot was indeed a tight Windsor, and the body of the tie flared away from it. The wearing of ties with casual clothes tended to die out when Ben Sherman (etc) shirts really took off.

    Great post! There's a pic of a 16 year old Kevin Rowland accompanying his 'Peanuts' essay in 'The Look' where he (off the top of my head) is wearing his (striped) tie fairly loose w/a white shirt, a cardy and a sheepskin coat. Need to check where he lived at the time, think it was Harrow though.
     


  10. Get Smart

    Get Smart Don't Crink

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    Here's that pic of Kevin Rowland from "The Look"

    [​IMG]
     


  11. Alex Roest

    Alex Roest Senior member

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    Here's that pic of Kevin Rowland from "The Look"

    Nice one Jason. KR lived in Harrow alright and was introduced to the Squire shop by Tim Brennan, one of the smartest dressers of that highly fashion-conscious area. In '69 he noticed a couple of boys with hair slightly longer on the top of the head, parted low and neatly dressed over to one side. It tapered into nothing at the back, instead of the more common square neck or 'Boston'. A variation on the all-American boy look.
     


  12. Get Smart

    Get Smart Don't Crink

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    this will def be of interest on this thread....

    NEDS (non educated delinquents).....UK film, takes place in 1970 scotland, looks like it has a good amount of skinhead overtones. I've heard it's quite good and very realistic. One of my mates is getting me a copy, cant wait to see it!!

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  13. Ikouja

    Ikouja Well-Known Member

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    In '68 my parting was fairly high.


    In '69 it was a little lower.

    Ah, so just the style, thanks for letting me know the proper way to say is a high or low part [​IMG]

    this will def be of interest on this thread....

    NEDS (non educated delinquents).....UK film, takes place in 1970 scotland, looks like it has a good amount of skinhead overtones. I've heard it's quite good and very realistic. One of my mates is getting me a copy, cant wait to see it!!

    Nice find GetSmart! It actually looks good, a little dark, but I mean, life isn't always bright and chipper. It's really neat hearing their accents, I was just in Scotland about three weeks ago, and hearing the way they spoke on the trailer makes me miss it way too soon [​IMG]
     


  14. loempiavreter

    loempiavreter Senior member

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    From Twisted Wheel: [​IMG]
     


  15. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    NEDS (non educated delinquents).....

    It's remarkably quick how something takes off. In the part of Scotland where I now live* the term "Ned" has always been considered a contraction of "Ne'er-do-well", and the "non-educated-delinquents" thing tagged on later - after all, we would say "uneducated" not "non-educated".


    *I know, I know - Northern England, South East London, Scotland... where's this flash [email protected]@rd going to claim to be from next?
     


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