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Mod to Suedehead

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. Soul Vision

    Soul Vision Senior member

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    You could be right but there may have been more to it than that, maybe they just did what they thought they could get away with in relation to parents and the wider society, it's not like there were many girls involved in the Teddy Boy or Mod eras. Seems like there were more involved in the skinhead times, even if they might not have looked so much the part.
     
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  2. Bela Kun

    Bela Kun Senior member

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    Looking at all the pics of 1960s skinhead girls, I had the same impression. It's weird, as it seems almost like a step back. In the 1950s, there were female teds with a definite 'teddy girl' look (though perhaps they were an exception rather than the rule):
    http://www.anothermag.com/fashion-beauty/8064/teddy-girls-the-style-subculture-that-time-forgot
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2016
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  3. Soul Vision

    Soul Vision Senior member

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    4 people like this.
  4. Soul Vision

    Soul Vision Senior member

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  5. The Saint

    The Saint Senior member

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  6. The Saint

    The Saint Senior member

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    My concept of teddy girls was always like these 2 in the picture below. .

    [​IMG]

    Of course if you saw them on their own , you might not even associate them with the 'Ted scene , at all. .
     
  7. yankmod

    yankmod Senior member

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    The Scene Club.1967.(according to Skinhead Soul)[​IMG]
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  8. yankmod

    yankmod Senior member

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  9. yankmod

    yankmod Senior member

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  10. yankmod

    yankmod Senior member

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  11. yankmod

    yankmod Senior member

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  12. covskin

    covskin Senior member

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    [delete]
     
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  13. Bela Kun

    Bela Kun Senior member

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    For what it's worth, Nick Knight's account from the 'Skinhead' book identifies distinct skinhead girl clothes not dissimilar to what the guys wore, as well as different periods:

    "The clothes of skinhead girls made them look superficially like the boys. 'Can't tell boys from girls' has been the typical whine from reporters when faced by any new youth group. Most skinhead girls, sometimes called rennes, would wear bennies, button-button fly red tags, white socks and penny loafers or monkey boots. As the fashion matured they had short mini-skirts beneath three-quarter length two-tone jackets and fishnet tights. The hairstyle would be a number two or three crop with feathered fringes all round. Some had long straight hair. The combination of fishnet tights, mini-skirts and cropped hair created an image which, at least to one observer, was absolutely stunning".

    There are pictures of girls that do look more 'skinheadish' than the Twiggy/mod girls that populate Bovvergrrl's blog. For example, the girl on the cover of Black Dwarf of 10 May 1970.
    [​IMG]


    These girls also have more of a 'uniform' going:
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    And then there's this photo, which I've seen dated as 'October 1969' (as these things go, it could be totally wrong, of course):

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    Last edited: Jan 31, 2016
  14. Soul Vision

    Soul Vision Senior member

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  15. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    What? Anyone else heard that one, because I certainly haven't.

    ('wrens', maybe? A regional thing?)


    And when they did, they would manage to look feminine in them. I can never remember mistaking a girl for a boy.


    Sorry, but that's arse-up, and over-simplified. The short-skirt look was around well before (some) girls started adopting boy's clothes. The two-tone jackets/suits on girls were all kinds of lengths. My bird in late 1969 had a Trevira jacket in blue that was 3/4 length, but also a PoW check suit with a bolero jacket and no lapels. I never saw any girls in fishnet tights. Patterned tights, yes; fishnet no.

    Having said that, I dare say some girl, somewhere...


    A description that gave rise to a-thousand-and-one revival nightmares!


    That much I can agree with.

    The thing is, we've already argued the bejasus out of the Nick Knight book. It has its good points, I'll say no more.
     
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  16. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Funny, but I was thinking about this subject only the other day. Decades on, and we're still moaning about how somebody else looks! :D
     
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  17. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    I think the reason you could tell was there were certain items of clothing or style that were exclusively associated with skinheads. BD check shirts and turned up jeans would be examples - in fact in our area the only people to wear Wrangler jeans were skinhead types, as I recall. Thus, no matter what a girl's hairstyle, certain clothes would give her a 'skinhead' identity. Only ever heard the terms 'Skinhead girl' or 'Skinhead bird' at the time and none of these other so called titles - 'rennes', 'wrens', 'molls' or even 'sorts'. Again, the usual disclaimer re: time and place.

    I have to agree with M-o-M about the fishnets - never seen in our area. In fact, to me, that black fishnet, white ankle socks look is more reminiscent of rockers/rock and roll era than skinheads, I can't imagine how that one has become accepted as 'skinhead style' as it is quite at odds with the original look. Each generation to their own, I suppose.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2016
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  18. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    I never posted this one at the time as I didn't feel it was relevant to the forum, however recent post made me think it might be of interest. (All four were originally written 14 years ago for the 'Royton Rag' - a fanzine type publication which has since become defunct. Hence, the number of mention of Royton, Oldham and individual names and places in all four of the articles.





    When I was 17, it was a very good year…
    The first in a series of articles where we look at the days of our youth. If you are, like me, turning into a sad old wrinklie here’s a chance to look back on the ‘glory days’ of your teenage days, the clothes you wore and the things you did (well, some of them anyway!) It’s an excuse to dig out those old photos and shine up those reminiscenses
    (and even to take exception if you disagree with some of the details – if so, let us know!)Better still send in some of the pictures and let us all share those memories.

    The Rock ‘n’ Roll Era 1956- 1961


    The ‘Teds’ 1956 –1958


    These were the first teenage phenomanum – Britain’s very own ‘juvenile deliquents’. The look emerged in the mid fifties with long ‘Edwardian’ suit jackets and narrow ‘drainpipe’ trousers. To these were added velvet collars and thick soled suede shoes known as beetle crushers or brothel creepers. Most photographs of the time show the style to be not too exaggerated (unlike the ‘parody’ of the style as worn later by Showadywady) and elements were adopted by a large proportion of working class youths. Hair for the lads was the Rock’n’Roll staple of the Brylcreemed quiff, sometimes worn with sideburns with, for true Teds, the hair combed into a thick point at the a back, resembling a ‘duck arse’, hence the name ‘DA’.




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    Of course the ‘architypal’ Teds could be found!



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    The girls wore flared skirts for jiving, blouses or sweaters and ‘Stilletos’ (though how they jived in those shoes remains a mystery). In some cases the girls wore a female version of the Teddy Boys outfit. (as these Oldham girls in 1956)





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    The style was spread by the media as as Britain went Rock ‘n’ Roll crazy and it borrowed elements from the hit makers of the day – the Elvis quiff, the bootlace tie, but – as later youth cults would – dress and behaviour was learned from the newspapers. When Bill Hayley and the Comets played in Oldham (Top Rank?) during 1957 the crowd performed the obligatory ‘rampage’, the seats were dutifully slashed.
    An Edwardian suit could cost upto £20 at a time when the average wage was about £10, so it was an indication of the swing towards a more afluent youth, virtual full employment and the percieved need to enjoy life.

    Rock ‘n’ Roll music was seen by the establishment as ‘the Devil’s music’ and jiving, though tame by today’s standards,was considered reckless but, if you could do it, great for meeting members of the opposite sex. To be a good dancer – as with some of the later cults – was to win the approval of your peers. The more practised lads could jive with 2 girls at once. There were Dance Halls a plenty and, along with coffee bars (and milk bars!) these were where the action was, with dances taking place somewhere or other most nights of the week. Dave, my colleague who is now 61, a Shotton lad who has lived most of his life in industrial N.E. Wales, tells with glee of
    summer evenings in Rhyl dance halls, mixing with holiday making girls down from Lancashire. “Wasn’t it an Oldham girl who taught you to jive, Dave?” I asked whilst putting this piece together, “No, Bryan” he answered with a blush, “It wasn’t jiving I learned with her!” The sexual revolution had begun! The ‘infamous’ violence for which the Teddy boys were to become notorious occurred most frequently in the dance halls. These were usually territorial, with lads from a particular town or estate having loose affiliations and were often instigated simply because some bloke, usually an ‘outsider’ was dancing with the wrong girl.

    1958 –1961

    By 1958 the style was changing. Although Rock ‘n’ Roll was still the dominant form of music the Teddy Boy look was dying out and the shorter ‘box’ jacket, worn with a straight, narrow tie was in vogue. The motorbike was growing in popularity and the leather clad look of Gene Vincent emerging to go with it, the photograph of the Royton Lads in issue 8 captures the look to a tee! Dresses were a staple for the girls though pencil skirts had also become fashionable by this time.(Royton youth club probably looked a bit like the set of the film ‘Grease’ – but with real teenagers!)
    The first elements of the rocker image were starting to emerge with this look and the emergence of the ‘Ton Up Boys’ and their motorbiking clothes and lifestyle.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2016
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  19. The Saint

    The Saint Senior member

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    First heard the mistaking the girl for a boy comment back in the 6ts but I'm sure it was being made with regard to hippies , whereby the boys and girls wore the same flares, the same afghan coats and had more or less the exact same long hair. I would agree that I never had a problem identifying a girl from our own sub culture.
    It is easy to forget how good many of our women looked in those short dresses but again I would agree about the fishnets. Before the arrival of the punk girls in the mid-7ts the only ladies l can recall seeing wearing fishnets would have been working girls.

    Wrens? No , to me a wren was a girl that was in the Navy and can honestly say I have never heard the word used to describe any other type of woman. .
     
  20. The Saint

    The Saint Senior member

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    With regard to the first picture, I would just have identified them as " men from the 50's". In the same way that you might see well dressed men in the 6ts that were not Mod's. Obviously the Ted look was a bit more varied than I probably recall and obviously it did evolve but I think there is always the likelihood of ordinary people from an era being associated with the youth cult of that era and generally we only see photos of the stereotype, on the whole but there are pictures above that are presumed to be skinheads that could easily just be a bunch of youths from the period . .
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2016
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