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Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by Spirit of 69, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    Hi Morganswallow. Yes, that's an old trick. :)
     
  2. elwood

    elwood Senior member

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    Quote:I think this might be the look you're remembering, skinny legs

    [​IMG]

    He wore that on Roxy Music's tour, late '74.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2015
  3. skinny legs

    skinny legs Senior member

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  4. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    My gut reaction is that's actually early 70s - maybe even 71. Kid at the front in the Harrington - looks to me to have a Lancashire red rose on his left side: that was very popular accessory in my area in 71; don't think you'd see it late 70s. He's also wearing one of those cheap trilbies they sold at the seaside - the detective in me says the slogan on it is "I'm only here for the beer" (tho' he's clearly under age for drinking) and that was the tag line in a popular beer ad campaign in 71 (according to my Googling). Also there seem to be a couple of lads wearing the surfer/ monkey jackets discussed on here previously- and I reckon they had vanished by mid-70s. Throw in the look of the shades and the check shirts ... like I said my gut reaction. And I'd guess this could be school trip judging from some of the "non-Look" garb. Would be interesting to know what that programme is that someone's pointing to at the back.[/QUOTE]

    That's a good spot, elwood, and dates it very well. Also the kid standing on the front row appears to have an original Jaytex check shirt on that many of us wore at the time - not pure gingham, they were made up of 2 main colours which were edged in a third on a white background. (Mine was maroon and light blue edged with a very thin gold stripe)
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2015
  5. roytonboy

    roytonboy Senior member

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    These pictures put into context the number of skinheads that were around, even at football. In this photo there are 3 or 4 we would class as skinheads out of about 20 fans. The idea that football grounds were full of skinheads in 1969 and 1970 is a misconception. We were in a minority at football, we were in a minority even amongst working class kids of our own age. To stand with others on a football terrace and see other skinheads all around could give the impression that the place was full of skinheads - the reality was, even at the big city clubs, it was a few hundred skinheads amongst tens of thousands of others. THAT'S what made us feel different, that's why many of us still have fond memories of the time - it was because we weren't trying to be the same as everybody else.
     
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  6. skinny legs

    skinny legs Senior member

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    Strangely enough yesterday I bumped into a friend of mine Kim and her Mum. Kim is in her 50s and mixed race. Her father was a black US Serviceman from Norfolk Virginia who happened to be a Chef/ Involved in the Soul Scene- there's a Chi- Lites connection Im told. Anyway Kim and her Mum shall be posting soon Im promised
     
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  7. skinny legs

    skinny legs Senior member

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  8. Soul Vision

    Soul Vision Senior member

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    Looks like a good comp, some of these tracks I know but others never heard the tune or artists before. Any of the originals have any faves here?

    From Youtube:

    At The Club



    The swinging 60s usually conjures up images of fab white beat groups in paisley shirts and hipsters striking a suitably kookie pose down Carnaby Street for the tourists. Yet, thinking back to my younger discotheque days, 1966 onwards, I can't for the life of me remember hearing a Beatles, Stones, Kinks, Who or Small Faces record being played in any of the clubs I went to. I was far from being hip and I loved those pop records on Radio London, but the club sound was Motown/Stax/ Atlantic.

    Track Listings
    1. Help Me Get The Feeling Part 1 - Ray Sharpe
    2. It Ain't What You Got - Jimmy Hughes
    3. Some Other Guy - Richie Barrett
    4. Looking for a Fox - Clarence Carter
    5. Some Kind of Wonderful - Soul Brothers Six
    6. Something Good (Is Going To Happen To You) - Carla Thomas
    7. I'm Gonna Run Away from You - Tammi Lynn
    8. At the Club - The Drifters
    9. Que Sera, Sera (What Ever Will Be, Will Be) - The High Keys
    10. Poison Ivy - The Coasters
    11. Chain of Fools - The Goodtimers
    12. Able Mable - Mable John
    13. Holding On With Both Hands - Eddie Floyd
    14. Last Night - The Mar-Keys
    15. The Memphis Train - Rufus Thomas
    16. Three Time Loser - Wilson Pickett
    17. Keep Lookin' - Solomon Burke
    18. 40 Days - 40 Nights - Don Covay
    19. Green Onions - King Curtis
    20. Comin' Home Baby - Mel Torme
    21. He Don't Love You (And He'll Break Your Heart) - The Hawks
    22. Slim Jenkins Place - Booker T. and the M.G.'s
    23. Just One Look - Doris Troy
    24. Walking Up A One Way Street - Willie Tee
    25. Young Boy Blues - Ben E. King
     
    1 person likes this.
  9. Clouseau

    Clouseau Senior member

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    Bad quality, but interesting pic nevertheless.
    [​IMG]

    This ad is not as good as the color ones, but must be quite old too.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  10. catchourbreath

    catchourbreath Well-Known Member

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    Was it common for the "originals" to taper or otherwise alter jeans/pants to fit skinnier ? I see so many pictures from the 2nd wave with people wearing skintight denim and have to assume it was a gradual thing picked up on from the beginnings, although could've just been a response to growing up with flares and slippers everywhere.
     
  11. Botolph

    Botolph Senior member

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    Maybe the second wave didn't get the memo about "shrink to fit" jeans and they just bought their actual size and voila! Ballhuggers!!!
     
  12. covskin

    covskin Senior member

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    Gradual evolution is a wrong assumption. Jeans were everywhere so the silhouette of the day was what was worn - going from straight leg to flares to tapered/stretch over that period (there was no real choice of alternative silhouette back then as I recall). As for alterations, I do know that early 70s bootboy types had broad triangles of material inserted into the seams of their jeans to create disgustingly wide flares.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  13. Natty Pinstripe

    Natty Pinstripe Senior member

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    I don't recall anyone having their Levis (jeans or Sta-Prest) taken in or "tapered", only taken up circa 69-70. When the skinhead revival heated up in the late '70's I think it was just that tighter jeans were available as were higher DM's. Remember the revival for most participants was a post punk-rock scene and so the influences would be wider - printed t-shirts for example.
     
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  14. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    A couple of forgotten tracks that used to get a lot of play time.
     
  15. Gsvs5

    Gsvs5 Senior member

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    My gut reaction is that's actually early 70s - maybe even 71. Kid at the front in the Harrington - looks to me to have a Lancashire red rose on his left side: that was very popular accessory in my area in 71; don't think you'd see it late 70s. He's also wearing one of those cheap trilbies they sold at the seaside - the detective in me says the slogan on it is "I'm only here for the beer" (tho' he's clearly under age for drinking) and that was the tag line in a popular beer ad campaign in 71 (according to my Googling). Also there seem to be a couple of lads wearing the surfer/ monkey jackets discussed on here previously- and I reckon they had vanished by mid-70s. Throw in the look of the shades and the check shirts ... like I said my gut reaction. And I'd guess this could be school trip judging from some of the "non-Look" garb. Would be interesting to know what that programme is that someone's pointing to at the back.[/quote] I would say 1970 was bang on target.The length of the hair.Equal numbers of Surfer/Harringtons.Surfers came first,but not everyone ditched them immediately.Reminds me of Roy's comments along the lines that you had to be fighting in the Pubs to be considered a skinhead back then.These kids were just following the fashion of the day.I am guessing they are about the same age as me at the time.- 13/14.
     
  16. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    That Ray Sharpe track echoes Aretha Franklin's 'Save Me', which is one of my all-time soul faves. I wonder which one came first, and which one of them Van Morrison was listening to?

    Lots of great tracks on there, but I think at the time Booker T's 'Slim Jenkins Place' was my favourite.

    Oh yeah, and 'Some Kind of Wonderful' by the Soul Brothers Six - a floor filler at Blackpool Mecca in my time.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  17. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    The Pop Records were played mainly in Clubs along the Kings Road or places like Members Clubs right in the heart of the West End - where you could not get in if you did not have an E-Type.I used to go(Lunchtimes) to the Bluesette Club,owned by John`s Children and they would play Pop.It was here that I heard "Good Vibrations" etc.

    Two of my Faves - Clarence Carter - Looking For A Fox and The Mar keys - Last Night.Used to love walking into a Club,with them playing.:)
     
    1 person likes this.
  18. browniecj

    browniecj Senior member

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    :D
     
  19. Clouseau

    Clouseau Senior member

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    Quote:It makes sense.

    Quote:
    Maybe the second wave didn't get the memo about "shrink to fit" jeans and they just bought their actual size and voila! Ballhuggers!!!

    I think we better speak, like said Tom, of "overlapping waves". The very tight jeans were not that common in late 70s/early 80s, at least here. It's true there was a reaction against flares, but i think the bald skin with tight bleached jeans and 14 holes boots is more a mid 80s look, and very cliché BTW. Of course there was regional and countries (yes countries, when we speak of the revival it became global [​IMG]) differences.
    Of course, if you take This is England as a reference (Ahem) you'll notice most of the actors wear very tight jeans, but they are not supposed to be 1977-1980 lot, i think.

    I sported the look around 1980 to 1983. I wore 'normal' jeans -never too tight, always Levi's but not only 501s, blue, white, and black. Black Crombie style coat (French made). Green MA-1s (Alpha & Concord). Black & blue Harringtons. Black Braces or thick black belt. White BD shirts. FP without piping in a variety of colors, Lacoste sometimes. White Fruit of the loom plain T-shirt. Levi's jacket. White or light sky blue Levi's sta-prest. Pinstripe trousers. Wooly hat. 8-10 holes black DMs. Brown or oxblood DM shoes. Black Dexter longwings. Black Tassel Loafers... That's what i can remember, and i had the memo about STF jeans.[​IMG]

    <p
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  20. Man-of-Mystery

    Man-of-Mystery Senior member

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    I have at last got round to transcribing from my old dictaphone a snatch of my convo with John Cooper Clarke in which we rambled a bit about the Ben E King gig at the Twisted Wheel in 1968. It doesn't tell us much because I only got us sat down and my recorder switched on part way through the conversation, but I thought I would share anyway:

    MoM: I saw Ben E King [at the Twisted Wheel]

    JCC: I saw him there! I saw him there! I was there that night in Whitworth Street. He had a gold sharkskin suit on. There were kids there that had never been to the Twisted Wheel before, black kids. Y’know a few kids used to sell pills and sh*t, but there were kids there that were… like… fifteen or sixteen who’d never been to the Twisted Wheel before, y’know, and they didn’t do many live shows at the Twisted Wheel, if you remember. Basically it was a discotheque. That night when Ben E… there was only one night that Ben E King was on, and I was there!

    MoM: We were both at the same gig!

    JCC: Fantastic! Fantastic! A life-changing moment. It was like Elvis to them kids from Moss Side, y’know, they were touching the non-turnup hem of his trousers.

    MoM: There was one kid there and he had this scruffy corduroy zipper jacket, with zip pockets everywhere, and I thought “Why’s he wearing that awful jacket?” And I realised that he was the Quartermaster, he was the retail outlet for pharmaceuticals.

    JCC: Oh right – that’s why the pockets.

    MoM: That’s it. So if there was a raid all he had to do was junk this jacket.

    JCC: Yeah. Yeah. Right.

    MoM: Anyhow this isn’t getting the bairn a new bonnet…

    JCC: No, I’m interested – you’ve made a personal contact because I was there that night… I’ve talked about it on the radio… unbelievable night, unbelievable. I couldn’t believe that [Ben E King] could be so close, y’know, singing… so close… That’s those clubs though, isn’t it.

    MoM: They turfed us out onto a bomb site, and it was dawn by that time…

    JCC: Yeah that’s right. What a fabulous night. And he died recently.

    MoM: He did.

    JCC: Great singer, great song-writer… he co-wrote ‘Spanish Harlem’ with Leiber and Stoller*… What a song that is…




    *Actually, it's usually credited to Mike Leiber and Phil Spector.

    I can also remember from that gig that Ben E King performed with a white/British backing band, probably hired for the tour, because of Musician's Union rules (?).

    Incidentally, my review of the JCC gig is here. If you're interested.
     
    1 person likes this.

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