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Milk

Tck13

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I just bought milk that is not homoginized or pasturized the other day. I didn't know this existed, nor did I know anything about milk. This website came from the stand I bought the milk from. Interesting stuff... The stand has butter along the same lines as the milk and it really makes a difference in flavor when cooking.
 

Kent Wang

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I get it from the farmers market. It's technically illegal so they get around that by selling you a share in the cow and paying you dividends in milk. However the unpasteurized milk I've gotten lacks the rich, "milky" taste of the organic milk that I buy from the supermarket.
 

acidboy

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isn't unpasteurized milk kind of risky?

and if a cow laughs, does milk come out of its nose?
 

skalogre

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Originally Posted by acidicboy
isn't unpasteurized milk kind of risky?

and if a cow laughs, does milk come out of its nose?



This chuckling bovine may know


 

acidboy

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Originally Posted by Kent Wang
I get it from the farmers market. It's technically illegal so they get around that by selling you a share in the cow and paying you dividends in milk. However the unpasteurized milk I've gotten lacks the rich, "milky" taste of the organic milk that I buy from the supermarket.

thats butterfat or butterfat flavoring they add.
 

mdk

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Originally Posted by skalogre
This chuckling bovine may know




I never understood how a bull can produce milk to be made into cheese.
 

Tck13

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Originally Posted by acidicboy
isn't unpasteurized milk kind of risky?

and if a cow laughs, does milk come out of its nose?


That's what I used to think but apparently it's not true anymore. That's why I posted the website.

Pasteurization was instituted in the 1920s to combat TB, infant diarrhea, undulant fever and other diseases caused by poor animal nutrition and dirty production methods. But times have changed and modern stainless steel tanks, milking machines, refrigerated trucks and inspection methods make pasteurization absolutely unnecessary for public protection. And pasteurization does not always kill the bacteria for Johne's disease suspected of causing Crohn's disease in humans with which most confinement cows are infected.
 

Tck13

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Originally Posted by imageWIS
Yes, but if you use modern equipment AND pasteurization, isn't that better than just using modern equipment?

Jon.


Got this from the website posted earlier.


Pasteurization destroys enzymes, diminishes vitamin content, denatures fragile milk proteins, destroys vitamins C, B12 and B6, kills beneficial bacteria, promotes pathogens and is associated with allergies, increased tooth decay, colic in infants, growth problems in children, osteoporosis, arthritis, heart disease and cancer. Calves fed pasteurized milk do poorly and many die before maturity. Raw milk sours naturally but pasteurized milk turns putrid; processors must remove slime and pus from pasteurized milk by a process of centrifugal clarification. Inspection of dairy herds for disease is not required for pasteurized milk. Pasteurization was instituted in the 1920s to combat TB, infant diarrhea, undulant fever and other diseases caused by poor animal nutrition and dirty production methods. But times have changed and modern stainless steel tanks, milking machines, refrigerated trucks and inspection methods make pasteurization absolutely unnecessary for public protection. And pasteurization does not always kill the bacteria for Johne's disease suspected of causing Crohn's disease in humans with which most confinement cows are infected. Much commercial milk is now ultra-pasteurized to get rid of heat-resistant bacteria and give it a longer shelf life. Ultra-pasteurization is a violent process that takes milk from a chilled temperature to above the boiling point in less than two seconds. Clean raw milk from certified healthy cows is available commercially in several states and may be bought directly from the farm in many more. (Sources are listed on www.realmilk.com.)
 

Kent Wang

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Originally Posted by acidicboy
thats butterfat or butterfat flavoring they add.
Really? Do you have a reference?
 

Reggs

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Originally Posted by mdk
I never understood how a bull can produce milk to be made into cheese.

Cows have horns, they just remove them because sometimes they hurt other cows or their children with them.
 

acidboy

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Originally Posted by Kent Wang
Really? Do you have a reference?

not really. but i am involved in a little firm that produces soymilk. as i understand it, we can produce soymilk that tastes exactly like cow's milk, all we need are butterfat, some flavorings and a little corn oil.
 

acidboy

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Originally Posted by mdk
I never understood how a bull can produce milk to be made into cheese.

notice the extraordinarily wide smile from that satisfied bull.
 

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