Mens Wearhouse...an employee Q&A

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by menswear2613, Mar 14, 2016.

  1. menswear2613

    menswear2613 Member

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    Last edited: Mar 15, 2016


  2. johng70

    johng70 Senior member

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    First question: What type of "secret" information about the company is a part time fashion consultant privy to? I really am curious.
     


  3. menswear2613

    menswear2613 Member

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  4. johng70

    johng70 Senior member

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    There's nothing proprietary to MW about what you've described. You're basically describing how basic retail behavior works.

    I wish I had more time to craft this post in a more positive way, But, I don't have time. But, this forum is about helping one another out, so I'll post it anyway. Your "offer" comes across as incredibly pretentious. You're a college student with very minimal industry experience. You believe you have a great sense of fashion and believe your research into fashion and your very limited experience as a part time consultant makes you an "expert" on men's fashion. Your "company secret" knowledge amounts to basic retail sales behavior.

    I would suggest a better approach would have been to provide your insight on other peoples' posts when you felt you had a good opinion to provide instead of trying to instill yourself as a go-to fashion and MW expert and suggest people come to you for advice.

    I'm making the assumption (maybe incorrectly) that you're 22 or younger and the only fashion training you have is what MW provided and your own research. That's not that strong a resume, in my opinion, for a thread like this. I think building up credibility based upon advice you provide in other threads would have been a smarter choice. Just one person's opinion. Do with it what you will.
     


  5. IChen

    IChen Senior member

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    You just described a lot of retail. Sell what the customer wants to buy....

    No but really what cracked me up and I work in retail is that someone else rings? That's awful. What happened to the handshake at the end of the transaction? Giving the customer your card and name?

    Some guys like to associate price with the person. I bought a 3k suit from this guy and I'll go back to him again.
     


  6. IChen

    IChen Senior member

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    Well maybe that's a harsh way to put it but I sorta agree. I used to sell isaia brioni kiton and belvest at neimans when I was 22-23. And jeez do I still have a ton to learn. I can say to the customer a little but let's be honest, most customers don't even go into much detail about the suits like canvas or spalla camicia.

    Retail knowledge of like how to pair isn't much knowledge and easy to get a grasp of after a weeks worth of experiences with how customers want to look and wear.
     


  7. menswear2613

    menswear2613 Member

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    I want to reply to all the comments on my thread.


    First of all, I want to apologize and say that in no way did I want to come off as arrogant, cocky, or pretentious.

    Secondly, I freely admit that I am no expert or should be writing for a menswear blog or website. I simply know that many readers of this site have a problem with Mens Wearhouse due to the crappy quality, annoying salesmen, and for other reasons. I just figured that I could answer questions about the company if readers had any, and try to provide value in that way.



    As for sales tactics, many MW salesmen should be avoided. I think this goes without being said, but many are there simply for the sale, and not to help you "Like the way you look"


    For example, there is a fellow salesman at my particular store who will mismatch a suit jacket with the wrong pants from a suit separate simply because he is too lazy to order in the correct pants from a different store, or unwilling to look in the back of the store for extra product. This same salesman nearly harasses customers--even when they come in to pick up their alterations. One example which made me roll my eyes was when an older gentleman came in to pick up a tailored suit and the salesman hands him the suit and says, "would you like a nice scarf with that?"


    I hope to continue to receive questions about products and quality of items within the company. I hope to provide helpful information in that regard. By no means did I try to make it sound like an expert.
     


  8. menswear2613

    menswear2613 Member

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    I know. I have been chewed out by my boss for ringing my own sales.


    At my store in particular, I like to ring my own sales because I can ensure that the prices I have told the customers are correct. Many times the sales associate misses an alteration charge, or gives away an item for free which isn't----resulting in me being chewed out. I do not like it.
     


  9. IChen

    IChen Senior member

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    Wow sales associates will miss out on ringing something? Lol sounds awful

    Why don't like assistant managers ring? Sounds dumb to just hire someone to just ring. Boring job
     


  10. breakaway01

    breakaway01 Senior member

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    Okay so I'll bite. What is your take on the Abboud MTM suit program? How many measurements are taken? Can adjustments for low shoulder, forward shoulder, posture be made? Options for lapel width? How are sales associates trained to take measurements and assess fit? Construction quality? Thanks.
     


  11. menswear2613

    menswear2613 Member

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    I wonder the same thing. The sales associates are hired to ring, rent tuxes, and set up shirt and tie combos. It is the entry level job. I worked it and hated it. Couldn't want to be promoted to sales. And yes sometimes they won't pay attention and miss the entire alteration sheet!!! A guy who dropped 800 on suits will walk out with 100 dollars of free alterations and I get chewed out by the tailor!
     


  12. IChen

    IChen Senior member

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    Wait what they set up shirt and tie combos? Shouldn't that be something you're doing while you're showing customer a jacket or suit? o_O
     


  13. menswear2613

    menswear2613 Member

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    The Joseph Abboud MTM program is honestly one of the best values that MW offers. I have fitted a dozen or so clients for MTM garments, and all have come out looking awesome. Let me walk you through the process, and then I'll actually show you my flannel cashmere suit I made for myself.

    1. Salesman takes the basic measurement, (over-arm, chest, waist, hips, ect) He will then try on a Joseph Abboud suit jacket on you (either modern or slim fit) and try to achieve the best fit in the shoulders. He will then measure any adjustments in the chest. Giving you more or less room. Salesman tend to give you more room then the best slim taper, but all alterations are FREE to a JA MTM, so when you get it, you can have the tailor do anything you like. No charge.

    The salesmen then has you try on JA pants, and notes the size. Again, any adjustments (tapering) ect, are free when it comes in.

    You choose your fabric, jacket and sleeve lining, and the style of coat and pants. No unfortunately you cannot choose the width of the lapels. I even called the shop to ask if they could make an employee exception, and they can't. You can also add extra details such as a ticket pocket and functioning buttonholes, which are 50 bucks extra. (I think it's nuts to do that to a customer but hey...I only work for them).

    Adjustments can be made for a hunched/arched back, shoulders, large biceps, large thighs, ect.

    Salespeople are truthfully trained in the basics. They can put a coat on you, do chest and sleeve adjustments, and pant adjustments, but very few know all the complicated adjustments. I spent a day in another state going to a regional training session, so I learned everything.

    Construction quality is solid. All the suits are hand-made in the USA in MA, by American factory workers. The fabrics are super 120's-140s, with some luxury fabrics thrown in. All fabrics are from Europe, mostly from Italy, with a few from Spanish mills. The suit is amazingly comfortable. I am a hard body type to fit, and I created a grey and light blue windowpane flannel suit to serve as a fall/winter suit. I will attach a photo. The flannel is think and warm, and very durable. No cheap flannel that wrinkles.


    Final: The value: All JA MTM suits, sportcoats and pants are always buy one, get one half. A suit starts at 795 for a range 1, super 120suit. So 2 suits for 1200. You pay 50% up front, 50 when you pick it up. All alterations are free for the life of the suit. Overall, to me, 600 for a MTM suit with 200+ Italian fabrics is a good value for someone getting their first MTM. Sport coats start at 495, so 2 for 750 or so. And pants start at 245, so 2 for 370 or so. I have done custom pants, and created a grey flannel pair, and a pretty cool brown and navy windowpane pair, which is nice to wear with a suitsupply navy sport coat in the fall.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2016


  14. menswear2613

    menswear2613 Member

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    You would think so....

    Here is how the process runs if you were to come shop with me.

    1. I greet you at the door, and you say you need a suit. I figure out your needs (interview, work ect) and I take measurements
    2. I pass your neck/sleeve measurement to a sales associate, as well as your need for the garment, who then goes and puts together the looks.
    3. You and I try on suits and we get the tailor to make the markings for the adjustments.
    4. When your changing back to your normal street clothes I double check the stack if I have time----at this time I normally either like the stack, or re-do a lot of it
    5. You and I go through shirts and ties that would work with your suit.
    6. An associate (normally the one who put together the stack) rings you out. I put your suit on the Alteration rack.


    The problem is when a sales associate is either new, doesn't care, or has a strange sense of "style" that I can't understand. 7/10 times, I go and re-do most of the stack myself because when I look at some of the combos....I scratch my head.
     


  15. Viral

    Viral Senior member

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    LOL..........the responses would be completely different if you said you worked part-time at RL.

    OP - nothing wrong with being confident in yourself and don't feel you need to bow to some internet strangers who are most judging you because of the brand you represent. Most people on this forum don't have much formal training or knowledge about clothes - we are all fans and hobbyists of this subject matter alike.

    Like I said, if you substitute MW with any of the "SF approved" ones you would have been welcomed with open arms!

    Good luck at MW!
     


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