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Mercurio

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It takes a really special person (I'll spare you the bold) to call strangers really special persons only because they correctly stated that a company is not following the law, and then asking for photos/examples of a "defective but fully functional" product to make up his mind whether said product is worth buying discounted, in order to decide before ordering, so that one can honour the still-illegal condition imposed by the brand, even though he would be supported by the law if he chose not to.
I would like to read which is the law that support your affirmations, related specifically for “final sales” of factory seconds, so I’ll appreciate it if you can share a link to it.
 

semaphore

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Is anyone still waiting for shipping for the field boot MTO? I know theyre usually late, but were about to hit August now for a June expected MTO.
 

standaloneprotein

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That is essentially what I did and they don't fit. I have some Johnston and Murphy, Spier and Mackay, and Thursday boots all in 11. They fit. Meermin in 11 doesn't fit.
I am mainly posting this for those who have yet to make a purchase and are trying to find their size. I guess my point is that the few GYW shoes I have tried run bigger than the Meermin I have tried, and was wondering if this is the case for others.
Funny thing, every brand you mentioned actually runs large: Spier & Mackay runs large, Thursdays too, and Johnston & Murphy used almost sneakers size, not so sure now.
 

Mercurio

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I actually had to do a fair bit of googling to find ALL the exceptions (most just stated the norm), but here you go:
.
Notably, no mentions of seconds, final sales, or any such things as valid exceptions.
I would like to read what @Meermin has to say about being repeatedly accused of illegally selling their "factory seconds", that could be considered defamatory.

On the other hand, I do agree with what you posted is what the Italian government establish about buying new items (which I assume is similar to the Spanish, as EU members), but in this case it's certainly not clear as we are talking about "factory seconds", not new items, so defects are implied:

"Factory seconds, also known as factory rejects or simply seconds, are retail items that, through minor fault of manufacture, are sold to the public for a reduced rate, rather than being discarded. Such goods are often resold at this lower rate after failing the factory's quality inspection, being returned to the manufacturer's factory by the original retailer, or (less frequently) being returned to the retailer or wholesaler by the customer".

This is what I found:


U.S.
All Sales Final policies are not prohibited under federal or any state law. As long as the policy is clear and in writing, retailers do not have to issue a return or refund except when a product is defective. If a merchant has an "All Sales Final" policy, it must be in a clear and conspicuous place in a storefront or website.

U.K.
All Sales Final policies are allowed in U.K. stores because a return policy is not required. If this is the case with your storefront or website, you must communicate limits clearly to your customers through signage or a clear policy on your website.

Canada
Like the other jurisdictions, Canada does not require that merchants accept returns or issue refunds under all circumstances. If you have an "All Sales Final" policy, it must be posted, so customers see it before they buy.
 
Last edited:

stephenaf2003

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I would like to read what @Meermin has to say about being repeatedly accused of illegally selling their "factory seconds", that could be considered defamatory.

On the other hand, I do agree with what you posted is what the Italian government establish about buying new items (which I assume is similar to the Spanish, as EU members), but in this case it's certainly not clear as we are talking about "factory seconds", not new items, so defects are implied:

"Factory seconds, also known as factory rejects or simply seconds, are retail items that, through minor fault of manufacture, are sold to the public for a reduced rate, rather than being discarded. Such goods are often resold at this lower rate after failing the factory's quality inspection, being returned to the manufacturer's factory by the original retailer, or (less frequently) being returned to the retailer or wholesaler by the customer".

This is what I found:


U.S.
All Sales Final policies are not prohibited under federal or any state law. As long as the policy is clear and in writing, retailers do not have to issue a return or refund except when a product is defective. If a merchant has an "All Sales Final" policy, it must be in a clear and conspicuous place in a storefront or website.

U.K.
All Sales Final policies are allowed in U.K. stores because a return policy is not required. If this is the case with your storefront or website, you must communicate limits clearly to your customers through signage or a clear policy on your website.

Canada
Like the other jurisdictions, Canada does not require that merchants accept returns or issue refunds under all circumstances. If you have an "All Sales Final" policy, it must be posted, so customers see it before they buy.
Although I’m having fun at their expense, I believe they are correct if they are EU customers. The problem for them however, their recourse is to sue the company; but they have to take them to court in the country from which the product originated. The reality is, it’s just a very silly idea to purchase seconds, and insist on being able to return them. These people are the poster children for the customer no business wants.
 

Mercurio

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Although I’m having fun at their expense, I believe they are correct if they are EU customers. The problem for them however, their recourse is to sue the company; but they have to take them to court in the country from which the product originated. The reality is, it’s just a very silly idea to purchase seconds, and insist on being able to return them. These people are the poster children for the customer no business wants.
Agree with you, additionally Meermin clearly advert in their FAQ:

"Most of our items can be returned If they're unused & within the 15 day from reception window, with the exception of Made To Order products, Custom products & Sales products which cannot be returned".

I doubt that Meermin lawyers allowed to post such statement in their website if they knew they were going against the law.
 

iva80

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Meermin apologetics again. In EU you do not go to court. There is a dedicated Consumer Protection agency where you file complaints.
The problem is not thst they are selling factory seconds, which is great, problem is they cannot return them.
 

Mirage-

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I would like to read what @Meermin has to say about being repeatedly accused of illegally selling their "factory seconds", that could be considered defamatory.

On the other hand, I do agree with what you posted is what the Italian government establish about buying new items (which I assume is similar to the Spanish, as EU members), but in this case it's certainly not clear as we ar talking about "factory seconds", not new items, so defects are implied:

"Factory seconds, also known as factory rejects or simply seconds, are retail items that, through minor fault of manufacture, are sold to the public for a reduced rate, rather than being discarded. Such goods are often resold at this lower rate after failing the factory's quality inspection, being returned to the manufacturer's factory by the original retailer, or (less frequently) being returned to the retailer or wholesaler by the customer".

This is what I found:


U.S.
All Sales Final policies are not prohibited under federal or any state law. As long as the policy is clear and in writing, retailers do not have to issue a return or refund except when a product is defective. If a merchant has an "All Sales Final" policy, it must be in a clear and conspicuous place in a storefront or website.

U.K.
All Sales Final policies are allowed in U.K. stores because a return policy is not required. If this is the case with your storefront or website, you must communicate limits clearly to your customers through signage or a clear policy on your website.

Canada
Like the other jurisdictions, Canada does not require that merchants accept returns or issue refunds under all circumstances. If you have an "All Sales Final" policy, it must be posted, so customers see it before they buy.
Well, if even after reading it verbatim you make up exceptions that are not there, I can't help you . And getting tired of the apologists here, now even accusing me of defamation.
What's absurd is selling defective goods without describing or depicting what is the exact defect, and then even pretending to override the law. And you people even defend that, wow.
So I guess I'll go somewhere else. Thanks for not being helpful (most of you).
 

Mercurio

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Meermin apologetics again. In EU you do not go to court. There is a dedicated Consumer Protection agency where you file complaints.
The problem is not thst they are selling factory seconds, which is great, problem is they cannot return them.
I can't be apologetic for a brand that I don't use, as I mentioned before. My point is that some comments are misleading based on supposedly legal facts that haven't being proved. Additionally, on assumptions that simply are illogical such as pretending to return an item that was bought knowing it was faulty. As I don't live in the EU, your comment is unsubstantial to me.
 

Mercurio

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Well, if even after reading it verbatim you make up exceptions that are not there, I can't help you. And getting tired of the apologists here, now even accusing me of defamation.
What's absurd is selling defective goods without describing or depicting what is the exact defect, and then even pretending to override the law. And you people even defend that, wow.
So I guess I'll go somewhere else. Thanks for not being helpful (most of you).
I didn't ask for your help, I asked for a clarification on your affirmations that you were unable to provide. It isn't hard to understand that the factory sale was related to hundreds of products with different issues, impossible to detail one by one. If you decided to buy, it was on your risk knowing their conditions.

Of course, you are free to go somewhere else as you wish.
 

stephenaf2003

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Meermin apologetics again. In EU you do not go to court. There is a dedicated Consumer Protection agency where you file complaints.
The problem is not thst they are selling factory seconds, which is great, problem is they cannot return them.
:crackup:

…apologetics? it’s a seconds sale.
843F1364-74FA-497F-9177-543B10E20D4B.gif
 

standaloneprotein

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Buying seconds is essentially gambling. Another aspect to consider is that you are probably buying a model you don't really like, or a shoe would not buy at full price.

I would like to add: there are things more important to worry about it, or to look forward to, just like the next round of Made to Order shoes.

EDIT: I just checked, nothing out of the ordinary.
 

iva80

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It doesn't matter if it is seconds as long as you sell online, that is the point. They could organize a garage sale in Madrid and "no returns" rule would be valid.
 

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