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McMansion or not?

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Kent Wang, Mar 12, 2006.

  1. Dakota rube

    Dakota rube Senior member

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    Growing up, I was told rich people didn't need to put plastic over their windows in the winter.

    Nor do they pile straw bales around the foundation.
     
  2. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Nor do they pile straw bales around the foundation.

    [​IMG] Yearly fall event at my place.

    I also heard the rich people have furnaces and not two space heaters.

    Holy fuck. Holler if you grew up with space heaters. Been years since I thought of them. They were great for putting your ski-doo boots and gloves in front of to dry out after playing the snow.
     
  3. CouttsClient

    CouttsClient Senior member

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    Did we share a mother?
    I am most certainly an only child [​IMG]
     
  4. ramuman

    ramuman Senior member

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    [​IMG] Yearly fall event at my place. I also heard the rich people have furnaces and not two space heaters. Holy fuck. Holler if you grew up with space heaters. Been years since I thought of them. They were great for putting your ski-doo boots and gloves in front of to dry out after playing the snow.
    My parents still use a space heater in their bedroom at night so that they can have the rest of the house at about 50F. It harkens back to perhaps 20-25 years or so ago when they had to squeeze every penny they could. They rode the dot com bubble up and thankfully not down, but the heater stayed. [​IMG]
     
  5. Dragon

    Dragon Senior member

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    I suppose the definition of what constitutes a "mansion" has changed over the years and from country to country, but I think that the following characteristics still hold true, in general:

    * Over 5,000-7,500 sf.
    * Special rooms designed expressly for entertaining and/or to accommodate various activities, such as large formal dining; conservatories/greenhouses/indoor pools; library/gallery/offices; luxe home theatres; etc.
    * More bedrooms than required by occupants (i.e. several guest rooms with ancillary baths).
    * Private domestics' quarters.
    * Extensive, designed grounds if in the country.
    * Various out-buildings (i.e. guest house/s; luxe garage/s; maintenance buildings; possibly domestics' quarters) if in the country.
    * These days, probably very high-tech security; a-v systems; and domotics.

    I have no idea if a strict definition exists.


    ^^ It would be nice if someone can share some examples of a modern mansion, as we now have many examples of McMansions.
     
  6. mm84321

    mm84321 Senior member

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    ^^ It would be nice if someone can share some examples of a modern mansion, as we now have many examples of McMansions.
    I'll try to take some pictures this weekend.
     
  7. zjpj83

    zjpj83 Senior member

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    ^^ It would be nice if someone can share some examples of a modern mansion, as we now have many examples of McMansions.

    Wafic Saïd's house (Tusmore House), which was featured in Country Life, is a modern palladian mansion.

    [​IMG]

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  8. ramuman

    ramuman Senior member

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    Is there a good book on architecture for a noob?
     
  9. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    Is there a good book on architecture for a noob?

    Read Witold Rybzinksi's stuff, he has a column on slate and wrote several books. I like Home: A brief history of an idea alot.

    My parents still use space heaters almost exclusively in the winter. My room had to have one as the previous owners (Architects no less) added on to the house and just put a duct in the heating/ac system to run air up to the new second floor. Which meant no air went to my room as it all got sucked away. More or less ok in the summer as it was protected by trees and much cooler than other rooms but awful in winter.
     
  10. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Is there a good book on architecture for a noob?

    Do you want to read about architecture or look at architecture? What are specifically interested in?
     
  11. ramuman

    ramuman Senior member

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    Do you want to read about architecture or look at architecture? What are specifically interested in?
    Read about. I'm primarily interested in the basics of design. I presume some of this dates back centuries or even further, but I want to know what factors (proportions etc.) come together to make a pleasing building and space. I'm a bit more interested about residential buildings over commercial buildings if that makes any difference. I know next to nothing about architecture.
     
  12. edinatlanta

    edinatlanta Senior member

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    Read about. I'm primarily interested in the basics of design. I presume some of this dates back centuries or even further, but I want to know what factors (proportions etc.) come together to make a pleasing building and space. I'm a bit more interested about residential buildings over commercial buildings if that makes any difference.

    I know next to nothing about architecture.


    Then I'm going to again suggest Witold. It is completely accessible to the layman.
     
  13. CouttsClient

    CouttsClient Senior member

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    ^^ It would be nice if someone can share some examples of a modern mansion, as we now have many examples of McMansions.
    I looked for something modern but came up with nothing worth posting.

    This is what I think of when I think of a mansion:



    Majestically sited on 242 fertile hectares, or nearly 600 acres, in County Kildare, Ireland, Lyons Demesne stands as a striking Âexample of classic Georgian Âarchitecture. The symmetry and proportions of the house are reflected in the composition of its formal Âgardens, establishing an Âambience of timeless harmony and elegance.

    Commissioned by Lord Cloncurry in 1785, the historic manor is in impeccable condition, having recently Âundergone a Âtotal refurbishment which was recognized as outstanding when it received the Europa Nostra and Institut International des Châteaux Historiques joint award for refurbishment. Contemporary conveniences are integrated into living areas of Âsophisticated design, allowing for a lifestyle of unique luxury.


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  14. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Read about. I'm primarily interested in the basics of design. I presume some of this dates back centuries or even further, but I want to know what factors (proportions etc.) come together to make a pleasing building and space. I'm a bit more interested about residential buildings over commercial buildings if that makes any difference. I know next to nothing about architecture.
    I recommend this book. It's very simple. They've basically documented how humans have built their environments throughout history and deduced from that some very simplified concepts of design. They cover every scale of architecture, from entire town planning concepts all the way down to how to lay out a kitchen (like how the faucet, work space, stove, and other components should relate to each other). The book was designed for the purpose of introducing laymen to spatial principles that they could use on their own to adapt their own surroundings. The book is organized with bolded passes and non-bolded descriptions, so it's very easy to browse through and pick out topics of architecture that are interesting to you. It has a cult-like following. It's one of those books that explains things you already perceive and makes you go "Of course! Why didn't I notice that?" [​IMG] A couple others: Steen Rasmussen's Experience Architecture, which explains how people relate to architecture in a more linear and narrative way. It introduces many multi-disciplinary topics that relate to architecture such as health, literature, art, sciences, sociology, etc. [​IMG] Francis Ching's Form Space Order, which introduces a broad range of architectural methods related to form, geometry and space in the form of an animated "visual dictionary" of architecture styles, from classical to modern. It talks about things like symmetry, proportion, circulation, orientation, modularity, anthropomorphism, etc. [​IMG] I've seen all of these books in Borders or Barnes & Nobles, so they are widely available.
     
  15. RSS

    RSS Senior member

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    I am most certainly an only child [​IMG]
    And I may well be older than your mother.
     
  16. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Stephen, is it possible to turn a small, cheap, and plasticized shithole of a house into a fine home by simply renovating the home with natural materials?
    Yes, it is. Anyone can do it. [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG][/IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  17. odoreater

    odoreater Senior member

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    I'm coming out of SF retirement to say this: I live in a house that was built in the 1920s and has all of the natural materials and all that good stuff, and it's nice and has it's charm and all that. But, there are many a morning when I wish I had a huge ass bathroom with double sinks and a gigantic ass jetted tub like all of the McMansions have. Sometimes I think I would enjoy those amenities more than I enjoy the charm of living in a well built house made of natural materials.
     
  18. crazyquik

    crazyquik Senior member

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    My parents still use a space heater in their bedroom at night so that they can have the rest of the house at about 50F. It harkens back to perhaps 20-25 years or so ago when they had to squeeze every penny they could. They rode the dot com bubble up and thankfully not down, but the heater stayed. [​IMG]

    Some space heaters have a nice low hum that blocks out background noise and helps you go to sleep as well. I had a roommate in college who always turned a fan on to sleep, because the noise acted like a sleep machine.
     
  19. RSS

    RSS Senior member

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    You don't need a McMansion to have that ... you need to renovate and/or add.

    I recently renovated one of the old Albert Farr mansions in Piedmont (in the Bay Area). Built in the early 1900s, it had ten bedrooms, no closets, and three tiny bathrooms. It now has five bedrooms each with a walk-in closet and its very on rather accommodating bath.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2011
  20. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    That's awesome. Do you have any photos of any of your work?
     

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