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breakaway01

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Whew what happened!? Can we just put all of the crazy in one thread so I can find it more easily?
 

smittycl

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Picked up a pair on these in blue over the weekend. Very nice. Highly recommend them.

1634644814484.png


 

smittycl

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Whew what happened!? Can we just put all of the crazy in one thread so I can find it more easily?
Did you mean the freaky Oxford thread? It seems fairly normal here.
 

TexasToast

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Wow I can't believe that I have the same polo shirt as Charles Yang. He has so many different type of dress styles he's like a master of disguises.
 
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dieworkwear

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What a delightful video
I think this video touches on two things @Despos has explained in the past.

1. The video shows the shaping that goes into the collar. I believe Despos has said that a square neck hanger can distort or stretch out the shape of the collar. This makes more sense to me when I see the work that goes into shaping the collar.

2. Also this discussion about how and why certain lapels have a more expressive "roll."

familiar with the term bloom applied when prepping coffee for pour over brewing method and I've heard of blooming onions. I think you guys mean the fullness of the arc of the lapel as it rolls just above the button.
Lapel roll and "bloom" are first achieved by how the layers of canvass, sometimes silesia as a filler layer, and the cloth, body and lapel facing, are "rolled". Meaning one layer longer than the previous to create the roll. Pad stitching holds everything in place. Pad stitching alone will create an amount of roll but if the layering is done correctly before the pad stitching, well, I think this is the difference between poorly done and well done.
The layering of the cloth and canvass are primary because the pad stitching is reduced in this area. The stitches don't extend much past the roll because they would be seen where the lapel doesn't cover them. Because of this, the layering is the most important.
Don't know how many tailors pay attention to this. I learned a nice technique in my third apprenticeship and have continued to use it.
Thinking more about this. The tailor who showed me the layering technique is the only tailor I know that did this. There is a way to baste the facings in this area, that's a necessary part too.

I think the video also touches on something @jefferyd has written on his blog. He made this post about six years ago regarding machine- versus hand-padded lapels.



Included is this video showing how a machine operator can finish upwards of 900 coats in an 8-hour workday. Assuming I'm understanding these videos correctly, it's amazing to me to see how such a labor-intensive process (hand padding) can be automated





But I also get the impression that a machine can't achieve the best of hand-padding (or maybe I'm wrong). My Steed jackets just have an OK roll. Salvo at I Sarti also said that he can machine- and hand-pad at his workshop, and he doesn't feel there's a difference in effect until you get to very lightweight cloths (below 9oz). But my Solito jackets have the most expressive "roll" of all my jackets. Don't know how to explain it except to say that the curve is very springy and very obvious, whereas my Steeds and I Sarti jackets are less so. Perhaps that kind of stitching is hard to do by machine?
 

UrbanComposition

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I think this video touches on two things @Despos has explained in the past.

1. The video shows the shaping that goes into the collar. I believe Despos has said that a square neck hanger can distort or stretch out the shape of the collar. This makes more sense to me when I see the work that goes into shaping the collar.

2. Also this discussion about how and why certain lapels have a more expressive "roll."




I think the video also touches on something @jefferyd has written on his blog. He made this post about six years ago regarding machine- versus hand-padded lapels.



Included is this video showing how a machine operator can finish upwards of 900 coats in an 8-hour workday. Assuming I'm understanding these videos correctly, it's amazing to me to see how such a labor-intensive process (hand padding) can be automated





But I also get the impression that a machine can't achieve the best of hand-padding (or maybe I'm wrong). My Steed jackets just have an OK roll. Salvo at I Sarti also said that he can machine- and hand-pad at his workshop, and he doesn't feel there's a difference in effect until you get to very lightweight cloths (below 9oz). But my Solito jackets have the most expressive "roll" of all my jackets. Don't know how to explain it except to say that the curve is very springy and very obvious, whereas my Steeds and I Sarti jackets are less so. Perhaps that kind of stitching is hard to do by machine?
Hmmm this is interesting.

Out of the makers I've used (NSM - who AFAIK uses various tailors - Salvo, Palmisciano, and Arrigo) I'd say Palmisciano has the most "spring" in their roll, and NSM has the least (it usually just opens up completely). Not sure if that has to do with the way the lapel is padded, or the canvassing used. Maybe a bit of both?

Curious to hear @Despos and @jefferyd weigh in.
 

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